Archive | March, 2016

Historical Perspective: Textbooks can instill hatred of history

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

By Jerry Kasten

It seems that whenever I have a conversation with someone for the first time and mention that I’m a retired high school teacher of American history, the other party often responds with, “Oh, I just love reading history, but I hated it as a child.”
If you too feel the same, I think I have a plausible explanation. It was those state-adopted textbooks we had to teach and learn from. They almost always were written by high school and college teachers (not historians), who were hand-picked by publishers, providing them with guidelines, suggestions, and previously state-adopted textbooks, so as not to contradict the usual conservative viewpoints of the state textbook adoption committee.
The primary aim of the publishers was, after all, to win the highly lucrative Texas state adoption contract worth millions, and not to provide a true historical narrative. Instilling patriotism and “feel-good” narratives takes precedence over sometimes controversial events, which are often omitted.
The result of this system is a boring, “learn these facts” approach to learning, making it easy for lazy or overworked teachers to follow the script and politically dangerous for those creative teachers who creatively went beyond the textbook with assigned readings, thought-provoking activities and films, guest speakers, debates, “extra credit” assignments, simulations, and committee work, all designed to make learning more interesting, meaningful, and closer to the truth.
Hopefully, you had a creative teacher who went beyond that state-adopted textbook.
In Texas, the selection of textbooks, especially in the area of history and economics, is based on the political priorities of the party in power. Since conservatives rule the roost, those individuals selected for the advisory adoption committees are usually considered “safe” because of their record of likewise conservative views.
Generally speaking, history aside, this committee is politically motivated to ensure what is presented are the conservative beliefs of events, not what actually may have occurred.
If you wish to read in more detail this troublesome aspect of textbook selection in the state of Texas and elsewhere, I highly recommend Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. Loewen.

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Start small; work toward big goals

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

Dear Families,
This morning I was looking for a particular book — yes, I do that often and it always surprises me that my books are not better organized.
However, that does lead to finding something you haven’t looked at in a while. I highly suggest going through your bookshelf (or someone else’s — which I admit to doing when I visit) and reading something that beckons to you.
I came across God’s To-Do List: 103 Ways to Be an Angel and Do God’s Work on Earth by Dr. Ron Wolfson. There are 10 chapters and rather than share just one, here are ideas from each of them — try them and make your own list:
Create: Use your God-given gift of creativity — paint, draw, sculpt, photograph, compose, dance, write, cook, bake.
Bless: Bless your home. Make it a sanctuary, a safe place, a retreat.
Rest: Take a nap in the middle of the day on your day of rest.
Call: Practice hearing. Listen to a loved one or a colleague speak, and don’t interrupt.
Comfort: Put a “Welcome” sign at the entrance to your home.
Care: Perform a random act of kindness — on purpose.
Repair: Be a giraffe — stick your neck out. Be a hero — find a new way to serve others in need.
Wrestle: Practice the art of compromise.
Give: What is your passion? What are you good at? Use your talents to serve others.
Forgive: Forgive your politicians for their mistakes.
These are just 10 of Wolfson’s suggestions. (I couldn’t resist the one from the “forgive chapter.”) Make your own list as you think of the categories. We are partners with God and must do our part in making the world a better place. Small ways and big ways — all count. Start now!
Shalom…from the Shabbat Lady.
Laura Seymour is director of Camping Services at the Aaron Family Jewish Community Center.

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Pesach cleaning does indeed have purpose

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

Dear Rabbi Fried,
I’m cleaning my house for Pesach as I have done every year since becoming more observant. I’m changing over the dishes to the Pesach ones, covering my counters and more. Although I know I need to do this, I’m having trouble getting anything spiritual out of all this cleaning and working. Could you give me anything to focus on which might help?
Sonya L.
Dear Sonya,
To tell the truth, I think what’s bothering you bothers most women, and their male helpers as well, when going through the drudgery of Pesach cleaning. The traditional blessings around this time of year are to have a Purim sameach (a joyous Purim last month) and a Pesach kasher (a kosher Pesach). One Chassidic rebbe used to wish people a kosher Purim (it’s easy for Purim to be joyous, harder to make it proper and kosher) and a Pesach sameach (it’s often tough to bring Pesach in with joy with all its hard work getting there).
If we take a new look at the preparation for Pesach in the context of understanding what a Jewish holiday is all about, we will be able to take a fresh new and redeeming look at Pesach cleaning.
The concept of a Yom Tov, or holiday in Judaism, is very different from that of the outside world. In the world at large, time is a continuum, which moves in a straight line. We mark off times to represent days and dates, but those dates have no relation to the same date a year ago or many years ago.
When one celebrates the Fourth of July, it is an important remembrance for events that took place over 200 years ago, but those events happened then only, and now we just celebrate them on the anniversary of when those events transpired.
In Judaism, however, as explained by the Talmud and the Kabbalists, time is not a continuum; rather it is a cycle. Every date takes us back to the source of that date. If at any given time of the year God chose that date to reveal the Divine Presence and shone the great light of the Shechina onto the world, when we return to that date of the year-cycle that light is still shining just as brightly as the day He performed the miracles of revelation. There are some who clearly see and experience that light, those who have elevated themselves to higher spiritual levels. But for all of us, that light is shining upon us in a hidden way; that hidden illumination is the source of the holiness of the holiday.
This leads us to a very different outlook upon our holidays. A Jewish holiday is not something you do; rather it’s something that you enter. For example, to relive the feelings of love and Heavenly protection in the desert, we need to actually leave our homes and enter a different physical and mind-space, and live in a Sukkah for seven days. We don’t just observe Sukkot, we enter the world of Sukkot.
On Shavuos night, which comes seven weeks after Pesach, there is a custom observed worldwide for Jews to stay up all night studying Torah. Through this total immersion in Torah we leave our worlds and enter the space of Sinai.
With Pesach as well, we are not enjoined only to observe Pesach, but to transcend our world and enter into the world of Pesach. This is implicit in the statement of the Haggadah that every year every Jew should see themselves as if they themselves are leaving Egypt. That’s only possible if you leave your familiar surroundings and enter a new world, the world of Pesach.
This is the reason we need to clean our homes of the familiar foods, even sell them to a non-Jew through the rabbi, and put out special tablecloths and dishes. We are no longer in our familiar homes, but have left those homes behind for our new homes — our Pesach homes. In the new home we are empowered to enter a new mind space, the world of Pesach. With every cabinet you clean and every shmatte you use up, you’re one step closer to entering the world of redemption!
Wishing a wonderful, joyous and kosher Pesach to you and all the readers!

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Purim, Passover pageantry has certainly changed

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

As you read this, I’m sure your mind is on Pesach coming. We all heard the Megillah being read aloud, and the name of Haman resoundingly drowned out; the graggers and flags have been packed away for next year, our treats distributed to friends and family, some money given to help those in lesser circumstances. On Purim, we’re commanded to listen and learn — eat and drink and be merry — give away some goodies — and open our wallets as well as those boxes and baskets of shalach manot goodies that we receive from others.
I love Passover, but of all our celebrations, Purim takes my memory back the farthest because it’s the most childlike. When else are little ones actually encouraged to make big noises in shul? I think it’s very special because it’s amazingly different from all the many other special times on our Jewish calendar.
When I was a child, things were different at Purim from what they are today. Not quieter or noisier, just different. Of course we dressed up, but we were always dressed as characters in the holiday story: girls would be Esther or Vashti; boys would be Mordecai or King Ahasuerus, or even the evil Haman. But somehow, Purim has morphed into the second coming of Halloween.
Two costumes, not from my childhood, but not so recent, either, will always remain in my mind. First, Rabbi Sheldon Zimmerman, appearing for his initial Purim at Temple Emanu-El in Dallas dressed in black from head to toe as Zorro — quite logical, of course, with that huge “Z” emblazoned across his chest. The second, a memory that still disturbs me: I was teaching at a classic Reform congregation when I spotted, among many costumes of many kinds, a young boy wearing a taliit and a kippah, with a black strap wound around his arm. “And who are you?” I asked him, expecting to hear the answer “Mordecai? But instead: “A Jew,” he said. “And what’s that?” I asked, lightly touching his leather binding. “A tourniquet,” he said.
So much for our educational success in passing on the essence of the holiday, let alone of Judaism…
The synagogue where I grew up was small, the sanctuary long and narrow, crowded with seats on both sides and the middle, allowing two slim aisles for our annual Purim parade.
Our flags weren’t paper with pictures as they are now; they were printed cloth, securely fastened to rounds of wood much more substantial than today’s Tinker Toy-type supports, and topped with pointed finials.
On these were placed cored apples, and into each went a good-sized candle – Shabbat candles, I would guess. And they were lit!
Then, lights out as we walked round and round, up one aisle and down the other, again and again. Oh, it was a glorious sight, and how our parents and grandparents beamed with pride! Of course, if any parents or grandparents aided and abetted children with such a fiery display today, they would be subject to charges of child endangerment. But that was a different time, in so many different ways…
And there was always a Purim shpiel, a silly little playlet very loosely based on the holiday story. Our parents and grandparents wrote and performed it. Looking back, I’m sure — from the adult laughter I still remember — that there was a lot of risqué material in those amateur productions that went right over our childish heads. When I saw a Christmas “pantomime” in London so many years later, I very quickly recognized what was going on, and I felt right at home.
Well, Z—, so much for nostalgia. Today’s children will have their own happy Purim memories. Someday they will recall hamantaschen filled with chocolate chips, while I remember poppy seeds. But that noisy blotting-out of Haman’s name: Ah, let’s give thanks that some things never change…
And now: back to getting ready for a Passover as memorable as Purim!

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Donated artwork auction to benefit gap-year students

Donated artwork auction to benefit gap-year students

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

Joram and Carole Wolanow plan to donate several pieces of art to the Yavneh Academy art auction, which will provide funds for students on a gap year. Photo: Ben Tinsley

By Ben Tinsley
bent@tjpnews.com

DALLAS — The art of Joram Wolanow, Carole Wolanow and Helen Fogel soon will end up funding “gap year” studies for graduating Yavneh Academy of Dallas high school students who might not otherwise have had the opportunity.
The Sunday, April 10 auction takes place at Yavneh Academy’s Schultz Rosenberg Campus, 12324 Merit Drive.
Dr. David Portnoy, Yavneh head of school, said whatever amount of money the auction generates will be split among the students according to the specific amounts each needs to be able to afford to participate in a gap year. A group of administrators will evaluate each participating student to make that determination.
Dr. Portnoy said the Wolanows appreciate all that Rabbi Yaakov Tannenbaum has done for his students over the years and came up with the idea for the gap scholarship as a way of honoring him.
“So we’re having the art event silent auction we are calling ‘High Tea Honoring Rabbi T,’ ” he said.
Over 70 pieces of unique artwork will be included in this afternoon’s silent auction.
“Rabbi (Yaakov) Tannenbaum saw all our art evolving and he asked us if we would like to donate our artwork for the auction,” Joram Wolanow said during a recent interview. “It was a very interesting idea.”
One hundred percent of the evening’s proceeds will go to support the Gap Year Scholarship Fund, which benefits the year of study in Israel for Yavneh students.
Carole Wolanow said she first became an artist after she retired about two years ago. She started creating mosaics and from there pursued the creation of a variety of different art.
Joram Wolanow said about six to eight months ago he decided he also wanted to walk that artistic path — at least for a while.
“I said, ‘I have an idea, I want to do something,’” he explained.
Using their home to double as an art studio, he combined a fine powder with flow tiles left over from Laundromat projects and discovered he had created something wonderful. So he kept going.
“Things kind of evolved,” Joram Wolanow said. “I made more and more of these tiles.”
Rabbi Yaakov Tannenbaum has been teaching a tehillim study group at the Wolanow home every Friday for the last six to seven years. He watched the art trove grow in both quality and volume.
“Rabbi got his idea watching all this art evolve,” Joram Wolanow said.
And the idea for the art benefit was born.
Rabbi Tannenbaum also solicited the artwork of Helen Fogel, an Auschwitz survivor who was liberated from the camps when she was 15.
Fogel said Tuesday she finds great comfort in painting and creating art.
“I highly recommend this,” Fogel said. “It is a relaxing, wonderful way to spend your time.  … I consider myself a happy artist, but still, I couldn’t believe it when they asked me to be part of this exhibit.”
Fogel, who turns 87 on April 1, said she took up art as a hobby about 20 years ago.
“I started with charcoal, and tried water colors, but lately I’ve been doing acrylics,” she said.
Fogel said she’s donating about 10 pieces of art to the auction. They will include a variety of different styles, including some still life.
“She has been working for many, many years in acrylics,” Carole Wolanow said.
Joram Wolanow expects this to be his last show. He said he is wearing of his hobby and wants to channel his energy into life areas other than art.
Carole Wolanow, on the other hand, said she is just getting started.
She said she wholeheartedly embraces her role as an artist and belongs to numerous arts organizations.
“I have committed to being an artist,” Carole Wolanow said. “I am doing a lot of work in acrylic.”
Those who wish to RSVP or inquire about the auction can call 214-295-3500 or INFO@YavnehDallas.org.

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JTS chancellor decries decline of Judaism in US

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

By Ben Tinsley
bent@tjpnews.com


DALLAS — Dr. Arnold M. Eisen — largely considered one of the world’s foremost authorities on American Judaism — will explain why he thinks the forecasts of Jewish decline are very much wrong during an April 5 speech on the campus of Southern Methodist University.
Dr. Eisen is the seventh chancellor of The Jewish Theological Seminary. His April 5 presentation — from SMU’s Department of Religious Studies — is part of the 20th Nate and Ann Levine Endowed Lecture in Jewish Studies. It is titled, “Imagining A Vibrant Future For American Judaism.”
During a brief Tuesday email interview with the Texas Jewish Post, Dr. Eisen explained the significance of his forthcoming comments.
“I am going to explain why as a scholar of Judaism in the modern period, and particularly as an expert in American Judaism, I see a bright future for the American Jewish community,” he said. “Drawing on my experience as chancellor of JTS I will suggest ways we can maximize the opportunities at hand.”
Since he took office in 2007, Dr. Eisen has transformed the education of religious, pedagogical, professional, and lay leaders for Conservative Judaism and the vital religious center of North American Jewry — enhancing JTS’s reputation and global reach, according to online literature exploring his career.
Additionally, Dr. Eisen has expanded the digitization and online accessibility of historic and contemporary JTS and JTS Library resources, and launched learn.jtsa.edu and many additional JTS websites.
He has also established popular JTS social media sites as a means of extending the conversation that is Judaism among the generations, and discusses Jewish education, philosophy, and values on his blog, On My Mind, Arnie Eisen, available at http://bit.ly/1qfhj1B.
His April 5 speech will specifically be delivered in response to widespread forecasts of gloom and doom in the future, according to poster information.
Dr. Eisen will explain his opinion that the forecasts of Jewish decline are wrong, and how religious institutions of all sorts can thrive in coming decades.
Dr. Serge Frolov, professor of Religious Studies and the Nate and Ann Levine Endowed Chair in Jewish Studies at SMU, said Dr. Eisen will be speaking on a topic of great national and international interest.
As many as 200 people might possibly attend, he said.
“He (Dr. Eisen) is a big name in the study halls of modern America,” he said. “He has name recognition. … So I think we will have a good turnout here.”
The presentation begins at 7:30 p.m. April 5 at McCord Auditorium, 3225 University Blvd.
This is located on the third floor of Dallas Hall, the domed building at the north end of the SMU campus.
Surface parking will be free after 7 p.m.
Anyone requiring information about the presentation is asked to call 214-768-4478.

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Around The Town: Clean up Trinity Park, Words to Action, Havdallah and JWI

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Tarrant County Programs

This Sunday, April 3, will be a busy day in the Tarrant County Jewish community with a number of programs on tap.
First is Super Sunday. Volunteers will be calling past and potential donors to the Federation from two locations, Congregation Ahavath Sholom in Fort Worth and Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville. The Federation is vital to the longevity of our local Jewish community as well to Jews abroad.
Answer the call on Sunday. Volunteer opportunities are also available with shifts from 10:30 a.m. to noon, noon to 1:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 3 p.m.
For more information, call Bob Goldberg, 817-569-0892.

Clean up Trinity Park with Mayor Betsy Price

The PJ Library invites the community to join Mayor Betsy Price in cleaning up Trinity Park from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Sunday, April 3. Meet at Trinity Park Pavilion 3.

ADL Words to Action Training

The ADL has developed an interactive education program for pre-college students designed to empower and equip 11th- and 12th-graders with constructive and effective responses to combat anti-Semitism and anti-Israel bias on campus.
These include anti-Israel incidents, prejudiced comments, hate speech/free speech, bias in the classroom, anti-Semitic vandalism and Holocaust denial. The training is limited to 40 students and will held at Beth-El Congregation from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday, April 3. Interested students should contact Ilana Knust at ilanaknust@bethelfw.org to get the form, which will need to be filled out and returned as soon as possible.

Havdallah at Beth Israel

Congregation Beth Israel will host a family Havdallah and dinner, Saturday, April 2. Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the evening will conclude by 8:30 p.m. with a Havdallah service. The program will include making a Havdallah candle and spice pouch as well as designing a Kiddush cup. Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker will teach everyone how to do a Havdallah service. The program is free and open to the community and made possible from a grant from the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County.

JWI to Hold Musical Program

Marian and Julian Haber are looking forward to the open public musical program hosted by Jewish Women International at 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 6, at Congregation Beth-El, Fort Worth.
Three talented musicians from San Antonio will entertain with songs of Shabbat and Broadway musical selections. The soprano is the Habers’ daughter, Dr. Susan Wynne, a child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrist who served as a cantorial soloist for two reform synagogues.
Greg Gonzalez, the tenor, is an accountant working in the business world. They will be accompanied on the piano by Dr. Mike Stern, a retired physician. He chairs the Israel Task Force of the Jewish Federation of San Antonio.
The Habers’ granddaughters (and Susan’s two daughters): Sarah Ghotbi is a senior in applied geoscience at Texas Christian University and plays the clarinet in the TCU marching band. Hannah Ghotbi is a sophomore at UT Dallas in geophysics, where she is president of Hillel.
Greg serves on the board of Golden Manor Jewish Senior Services in San Antonio. Mike is a member of the board of directors of Temple Chai, San Antonio. Susan, Mike and Greg perform throughout Texas.

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Dallas Doings: NCJW, Award, Holocaust survivor speech canceled

Dallas Doings: NCJW, Award, Holocaust survivor speech canceled

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

Submitted photo Anna Kehde (left) leads the Texas chapter of Moms Demand Action. She will speak at the NCJW meeting.

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

NCJW Meeting

The National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Dallas Section, will feature a program on “Bringing Gun Sense to Texas” at its Annual Spring Meeting at 10 a.m. Thursday, April 7 at Bent Tree Country Club.
Anna Kehde, leader of the Texas chapter of Moms Demand Action, will be the featured speaker.
As an organization that cares deeply about the safety of its children and grandchildren, NCJW is committed to bringing information to members, supporters and the broader community to help protect our families and friends.
At an upcoming meeting, NCJW Dallas President Caren Edelstein, and Rhona Streit, nominating committee chair, will present the 2016-2017 proposed slate of officers, directors for approval by the membership. The proposed 2016-2017 slate of officers is: president, Joyce Rosenfield; vice president administration, Renee Karp; vice president community service, Nonie Schwartz and Susie Wolbe; vice president financial development, Stacy Barnett; vice president membership, Amy Schachter; vice president public affairs, Elaine Bernstein and Jayme Cohen; vice president communications, Marlene Gorin; recording secretary, Jackie Fleschman; associate secretary, Jo Reingold; treasurer, Ellen Lasser; and associate treasurer, Teresa Rosenfield.
Directors to be approved include: Carol Alkek, Andrea Wolf Bleicher, Liz Cooper, Laura Diamond, Kristen Fagelman, Marilyn Fiedelman, Debra Levy-Fritts, Risa Gross, Jane Lachman, Barbara Rose, Randi Smerud, Debby Stein, Carol Tobias, Melissa Tone, Carol Weinstein, and Debby Weinstein. Proposed Nominating Committee members to be elected are: Robin Zweig, chair; Carole Cohen, Frieda Hudspeth, Peggy Millheiser and Rosie Stromberg, members.
“I encourage everyone to come hear what we can each do to ensure the safety of our children, friends, and families in the community,” said Edelstein. “Please join us for this important meeting.”
Cost is $18 per person. The meeting will be held at the home of a NCJW member. For more information and to make your reservation, visit ncjwdallas.org or call Nicole Gray 214-368-4405 ext. 102.
— Submitted by Suzi Greenman

Paul Kinberg, DPM, Accepts Award of Excellence

Mazal tov to Paul Kinberg, DPM, who was honored with the Award of Excellence on Sunday, March 20 by the American Podiatric Medical Association. Dr. Kinberg was nominated by Leslie Campbell, DPM, then president of the Texas Podiatric Medical Association. The award is presented to members in good standing in recognition of outstanding national accomplishments in scientific, professional, or civic endeavors. Nominees must have demonstrated outstanding service to APMA.
Dr. Kinberg graduated in 1974 from the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine (now Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine). He completed a preceptorship with Bernard J. Hersh, DPM, in Dallas in 1978. Among his awards are the Texas Podiatric Medical Association (TPMA) Distinguished Service Award in 2004, and a spot on Podiatry Management magazine’s 175 Most Influential Podiatrists list in 2006.
He has published countless papers and given lectures to contribute to and influence the profession.
A few words from those who nominated Dr. Kinberg:

  • Dr. Kinberg’s work on the ICD-10 conversion has (helped) many APMA members make sense of the change in how we bill our services. He has shown his leadership abilities as he has taken the reins on this project for APMA.
    — Joseph Caporusso, DPM, APMA past president
  • Dr. Kinberg spearheaded APMA’s plan for podiatric physicians in preparation for the ICD-10 initiative. This required an enormous effort with countless hours of dedication.
    — Kenneth F. Malkin, DPM
    There’s no one I can think of in this profession (who) has earned APMA’s Award of Excellence more fully than Dr. Kinberg.
    — Don Canada, TPMA executive director

Dr. Kinberg thanked his family and colleagues and those who recommended him for their encouragement. He thanked Don Canada for more than 25 years of work for the profession and for being a friend and mentor. He also thanked APMA Health Policy and Practice Director Scott Haag, JD, MSPH, for his unwavering leadership and skill and lauded the work of APMA Consultant Harry Goldsmith, DPM, and his dedicated service to podiatric medicine.

Holocaust Survivor speech canceled

“Holocaust Survivor and Hidden Child Simon Gronowski,” which was planned for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 7 at Booker T. Washington, has been canceled.

 

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Legacy to sell Preston Hollow property

Legacy to sell Preston Hollow property

Posted on 31 March 2016 by admin

File photo Cornerstone Healthcare Group Holding, Inc., will take ownership of The Legacy Preston Hollow on April 1.

By Ben Tinsley
bent@tjpnews.com

On April 1, ownership of The Legacy Preston Hollow senior living residence will officially transfer from The Legacy Senior Communities of Plano to Cornerstone Healthcare Group Holding, Inc. of Dallas.
The proceeds from this particular sale will help The Legacy Senior Communities pay for the construction of The Legacy Midtown Park in Dallas — a planned state-of-the-art Jewish-sponsored and continuing care rental retirement community.
Steve and Carol Aaron loaned The Legacy Senior Communities the additional $7.2 million they needed to acquire the 10-acre parcel of land necessary to create The Legacy Midtown Park — which is expected to open in 2019.
Jerry Rasansky, chair of the board of directors of The Legacy Preston Hollow, said in an issued statement that Cornerstone understands the value of Jewish customs.
“The decision to sell was based on expert advice that a sale will allow the company to maximize the value of The Legacy Preston Hollow,” he added.
“It was critical to find a buyer who understands the value of our Jewish customs and who would allow us to continue providing those traditions to the residents,” Rasansky said.
Subsequently, Cornerstone is willing to work with The Legacy Senior Communities so residents can receive the same Jewish programming and services at The Legacy Senior Communities’ expense — and with the continued financial support of The Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, Rasansky added.
Cornerstone has signed a letter of understanding that stipulates Jewish programming will continue to be offered at The Legacy Preston Hollow, officials said.
Other Jewish amenities — such as Shabbat and High Holiday services, rabbi visits, Jewish programming and charitable services to Jewish residents — will also still be available at the facility after the sale.
The offer from Cornerstone to buy The Legacy Preston Hollow was thoroughly reviewed before it was unanimously accepted, explained Michael Ellentuck, president and CEO of The Legacy Senior Communities.
That decision came only after extensive evaluation and research. Several other offers also were considered, Ellentuck said.
“Cornerstone Healthcare Group has a strong reputation and is an experienced provider of quality services in the healthcare industry,” Ellentuck said. “The company will bring additional specialized nursing and medical services to the residents.”
Marc R. Stanley, chair of the board of trustees of The Legacy Senior Communities, said Cornerstone Healthcare Group has shared with them their plans to use The Legacy Preston Hollow as its model facility — mirroring their focus on quality care.
“We recognize our responsibility to the residents and families we serve at The Legacy Preston Hollow, as well as to our employees,” Stanley said. “We are committed to making the transition as seamless as possible.” The decision to sell the property was made after it was determined the Preston Hollow campus lacks the capacity for expansion to add rental independent living units and memory care, officials said.
The Legacy Senior Communities is a nonprofit charitable organization created to serve the Jewish elderly in 1953. It is the parent company of The Legacy Willow Bend and The Legacy at Home.

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Exhibit looks beyond Anne Frank’s diary

Exhibit looks beyond Anne Frank’s diary

Posted on 24 March 2016 by admin

Submitted photo The Dallas Holocaust Museum will hold the “Anne Frank — A History for Today” exhibit through May 31.

Dallas Holocaust Museum’s event open through May 31

By Ben Tinsley
bent@tjpnews.com


DALLAS — Anne Frank spent nearly two years hiding from the Nazis in a secret annex in Amsterdam. All the while, she wrote in a special diary about her experiences, her dreams, and her fears.
The “Anne Frank — A History for Today” exhibit running through May 31 at the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education & Tolerance examines the world events that shaped the life of this young girl, who is one of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust.
“People became so captivated with Anne Frank as a symbol for children and not a lot of people look beyond her diary,” explained Dr. Charlotte Decoster, the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance’s assistant director of education. “ … Many don’t know she died during the Holocaust, that she was sent to Auschwitz.”
Anne Frank’s memoir, The Diary of a Young Girl, documents her life in hiding for 25 months during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.
After the Bible, the Anne Frank memoir is one of the planet’s most widely known books. It is the basis for several plays and films and has been translated into 67 languages — with more than 30 million copies sold.

‘Walking encyclopedia’

The exhibit at the Holocaust Museum, 211 North Record St., is presented in collaboration with the Anne Frank Center USA.
Dr. Decoster, a native of Belgium, is a Holocaust scholar often referred to by colleagues as a “walking encyclopedia on all things Anne Frank and child rescue.”
Her insight stems largely from the fact her grandfather worked as a doctor helping victims in the concentration camp where Anne Frank and her sister, Margot, are believed to have died of typhus.
Anne Frank and her family moved from Germany to Amsterdam in the early 1930s when the Nazis gained control over Germany. But the German occupation of the Netherlands trapped them in Amsterdam by May 1940.
When the persecutions of the Jewish population started to increase in July 1942, the Franks went into hiding in concealed rooms behind a bookcase in the building where Anne’s father worked.
They were betrayed and transported to concentration camps in August 1944.
Anne Frank and her sister, Margot, were eventually transferred to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where they died in February or March 1945 — just weeks before the camp was liberated in April.
“People don’t realize how close she (Anne Frank) came to being liberated,” Dr. Decoster said. “If she had survived we could have learned from her in person but that is the ‘What if’ question.”

Replica bookcase

One of the interesting aspects of the exhibit for those who attend is the museum’s reconstruction of the movable bookcase that concealed the door to the secret annex where Anne Frank and her family hid alongside the van Pels family and Fritz Pfeffer.
“They can walk into our annex and learn about the annex in Amsterdam where the family hid,” Dr. Decoster said.
Anne Frank’s father, Otto, gave her the diary for which she would become so well-known.
But he did so in large part as a way to help her find a way to stay quiet while in hiding, Dr. Decoster said.
“She had a very bubbly personality and he would have to keep her quiet for months and years,” she said. “He had a find a way to help her express herself while in hiding.”
After his daughter’s death, Otto Frank prepared the first version of her diary for publication. Certain passages were removed — particularly those in which Anne Frank is critical of her parents as well as areas that discussed her growing sexuality. Also, pseudonyms were added to protect the identities of those in the attic with Anne Frank.
The exhibit — in Spanish and English — is sponsored by Clampitt Paper, Dallas Tourism Public Improvement District, Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, and The Catholic Foundation.

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