Archive | November, 2016

With ballots cast, remember Truth connects us with God

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

Dear Rabbi Fried,
I know you don’t use your column to discuss politics, and I’m not trying to pull you into what is still a very emotional situation throughout the country; but I am wondering if there are any Jewish lessons we can learn from this past very heated and sometimes not so nice election period?
— Cindy K.
Dear Cindy,
Unfortunately, there were a number of things which transpired, some which continue to emerge, which we have Jewish lessons to learn from. To be more precise, there are Jewish lessons to be learned of how not to be from many of the things that were said and done.
I think we can focus on one central idea which was glaring during this period and spreads to many other areas in world politics — in ways we haven’t seen the likes of before.
That is the importance of Truth.
So much of the candidates’ debate time and air time in general was spent, not in the discussion of real issues, but in bashing one another and trying to show how what was said about each other was a lie.
This was not at all isolated to the candidates themselves. A. O. Salzberger Jr., the publisher of The New York Times, penned a letter to readers Friday promising that the paper would “reflect” on its coverage of this year’s election, after the paper was taken to task for demonizing Trump and his camp from the very outset, making Clinton look functional and organized and the Trump campaign discombobulated. (See at length “New York Times publisher vows to ‘rededicate’ paper to reporting honestly,” foxnews.com). My intent is not to defend one candidate or another, only that we need to recognize that a significant amount of information the electorate was fed was not necessarily the truth.
This, on the backdrop of a world body as significant as UNESCO voting, twice, that Jerusalem does not historically belong to the Jews, rather to the Muslim world, a world that came about thousands of years after Abraham, Isaac and Jacob were there and well over a thousand years after King Solomon built the Temple there. We are living in a world in which Truth is a rare commodity.
This is not a totally new problem. The Medrash relates that when God posed the question to the angelic court whether or not to create Man, the Angel of Truth voted he should not be created because he will be full of lies. We see that the potential to lie is greater than to tell the truth.
The Talmud explains this to be implicit in the very fiber of creation. The building blocks by which the world was created are the letters of the Hebrew alphabet. When one peers into the aleph-beis, the Hebrew alphabet, we unlock many secrets of creation. The word for “lie,” “sheker,” is spelled “shin kuf reish”; those three letters appear together in the Hebrew alphabet. Since they are close together, we learn that sheker, a lie, is very “close,” or easy to tell. Truth, however, which is “emet” is Hebrew, is spelled “aleph mem tav”; the first letter, the last letter and the middle letter. Those letters are as far apart as can be in the Hebrew alphabet. This is to teach us that truth is distant; one needs to work hard to stick to the truth and live by it, unlike a lie which is prevalent and very easy to live by!
That is why the Angel of Truth voted not to create a being who would be so liable to fall into a life of lies. (There’s an old Yiddish saying that, “if you tell the truth you don’t need to remember what you said!”)
If God chose to create us despite the vote of the Angel of Truth, knowing full well that He is creating a world where it’s easier to live by a lie than by truth, than God was creating Man with exactly this test in mind, the test of living by truth. God is referred to as “Elokim Emes,” the God of Truth, and one connects to God through Truth.
May we learn this important lesson from that which we saw, heard and loathed, during the election period and in the world around us, and strive to be the children of Jacob who manifested and was the pillar of Truth in the world; “titein emes l’Yaakov,” the Jewish people live by Truth.

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Rabbis reach out to congregations after election

Rabbis reach out to congregations after election

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

Photo: Flickr/Gage Skidmore Jewish Texans voted in myriad ways during the 2016 election. Some are fearful of his policies, while others are exuberant, and many more in the middle. Area rabbis reached out to their congregations to reassure them after the results.

Photo: Flickr/Gage Skidmore
Jewish Texans voted in myriad ways during the 2016 election. Some are fearful of his policies, while others are exuberant, and many more in the middle. Area rabbis reached out to their congregations to reassure them after the results.

Staff report

With the election of Donald J. Trump as the 45th president of the United States, opinions have been strong and divided throughout the Metroplex Jewish community.
Numerous rabbis immediately reached out to their congregants and the community at large to offer words of hope and reconciliation.
Here are some excerpts:

Rabbi David Stern, Temple Emanu-El, Dallas

“From Abraham’s argument for justice to Jeremiah’s call for peace in the cities in which we dwell, we have turned to the wellsprings of our faith not only to sustain ourselves in desert times, but to water the fields of promise for every human being.

Stern

Stern

“That historic commitment is no less true in the days after an election than in the days before it. It remains just as true whether the winner is Republican or Democrat. Our commitment persists because as a community of faith, we vest some of our hard-earned hope in this promise we call America. We manifest it in deeds that serve a stable and enduring democracy. We demonstrate our faith by urging the members of both parties to work with President-elect Trump to create real change for the Americans who so desperately need it, and to act and speak in such a way that reminds us all that we belong to something much greater than ourselves.”

Rabbi Andrew Bloom, Congregation Ahavath Sholom, Fort Worth:

Each and every one of us have a moral core that is based upon the goodness within ourselves and those around us. For those of faith, this moral code comes from the Bible, and more specifically from the Book of Leviticus. In Leviticus 9:18 we are taught that “you shall love your neighbor as yourself: I am the LORD,” or in other words we shall treat our neighbors like we would want to be treated ourselves and all this within the shadow of God’s light.

Bloom

Bloom

In order for our society to flourish we need to remember another biblical teaching from the Book of Leviticus. In this teaching we are told that” You are to be holy to me because I, the LORD, am holy.” (Leviticus 20:26) In other words our society needs to be based upon the belief that we must try and live up to the moral code that we received from God, and in order to do that we must not only remember the teachings from Leviticus but we must also live them.
It is my hope and prayer that at this divisive time, all of us irrespective of our race, religion, gender, political beliefs etc can come together so that the words of the Psalmist will ring true, thus allowing us to “live by the words of God and not die by them.” (Loose translation of Psalm 188:17).

Rabbi Andrew Paley, Temple Shalom, Dallas:

Regardless of whichever candidate received our vote, while some may grieve and some may dance, may we all commit ourselves to bringing more love, more kindness, more compassion, more justice, more thoughtfulness, more care, and more peace to each other every day. Our very country depends on that and depends on us being active and involved citizens. We can and should do no less.

Paley

Paley

Hiniei Mah Tov Umanayim, shevet achim gam yachad — How beautiful it can and will be when our brothers and sisters will one day dwell together in unity. May this be God’s will.

Rabbi Adam Roffman, Congregation Shearith Israel, Dallas

We are mindful also of the sense of fragility that pervades our nation in the wake of this week’s events. Though there are many among us that celebrate the results of this week’s election, there are also many who are disappointed and hurt by the results.
But there is also reason to hope. We have been reminded, these past days, of the power that shared values and common concern have to unite and heal us. We have heard encouraging words and seen encouraging pictures from leaders of both the outgoing and incoming administrations. We join together with all of our nation’s leaders to pray that President-elect Trump’s leadership will lead to success and prosperity for every American.

Rabbi Stefan Weinberg, Congregation Anshai Torah, Plano

Many of us are in mourning right now. Hopes and dreams have been dashed. The passion that has led many to dedicate themselves to addressing today’s issues from the Democratic Party’s platform is simply laudable. Yet, it is in defeat right now. We have to give each other time and space to accept the loss, to accept defeat and to acknowledge there will be new roles to play in the political arena.

Weinberg

Weinberg

At the same time many of us are reveling in the stunning victory of a man who is the epitome of an outsider — having never been elected to a political office or served in our military — unprecedented. The country has spoken once again and the message is unequivocal — the quagmire that defines Washington, D.C. is unacceptable. Change is demanded and with that change is a mandate for a different way of doing business.
This is not the time for ridiculing each other, for gloating over one another, or the time for violent protests. We need healing. We need a different way of speaking about one another.
We need a new universe of discourse that jettisons bigotry, prejudice, hatred and fear of the other from our world.
Hillary Clinton’s conciliatory speech on Wednesday morning was a lesson in humility.  Donald Trump extended an olive branch in his acceptance speech the night before. We are in this together. We have a long history of being divided over key issues, ranging from slavery and women’s suffrage to isolationism, the Vietnam War and abortion, we are a two-party country that continues to vacillate between two distinct poles. Yet, the strength of this great country has always been its capacity to find consensus, to compromise with one another, to listen to the pleas of each other. It is a very Jewish practice found on every page of Talmud. … We can do it again.

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Middle East’s responses to Trump victory varied

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

HAIFA, Israel — Initial reactions in the Middle East to Donald Trump’s election have ranged from positive and cautiously optimistic (Israel, Egypt, Jordan, parts of the Saudi family, the United Arab Emirates, etc.), to outright disbelief and borderline panic (Iran, Qatar, parts of the Saudi family, the Palestinians, Morocco, the Muslim Brotherhood, etc.).
Most analysts attribute the reactions to two main factors:
1. Statements made by candidate Trump during the campaign about support for Israel, on the one hand, and possible U.S. isolationism, on the other.
2. A widespread belief throughout the Muslim world that a president Clinton would be “very sympathetic” to their interests, causes and business affairs thanks to exceptionally large donations to the Clinton Family Foundation, and the fact that Huma Abedin, who grew up in Saudi Arabia and has close ties family to the Muslim Brotherhood, would have had unfettered access and influence in the Oval Office.
As Trump’s inner circle begins to take shape the Israelis are happy with his assumed choice for Ambassador to Israel — his senior advisor David Friedman, who said in an interview this week that: “Trump believes that everyone in Israel — from people on the right to people on the left — want peace. No one wants their children to continue to be killed in wars,” adding that in any negotiations, with the Palestinians: “Trump will let Israel lead … he won’t force Israel.”
And while there is initial concern with the choice of Stephen Bannon as chief strategist because of alleged past anti-Semitic comments, commentators here observe that though he is a strong supporter of Israel, he will be involved mainly in domestic policy (“draining the swamp”). Trump said that Bannon and Reince Priebus (incoming chief of staff) would work “as equal partners to transform the federal government.”
Trump’s possible foreign policy doctrine, especially regarding the Middle East, is a mixed bag. I tend to agree with senior analyst Ron Ben Yishai, who wrote this week in Ynet that “Trump and the Russians will agree to fight the Islamic State together, but Trump will let the Russians help Bashar Assad win.
This means that the radical Shiite axis led by Iran, with Russian aid and defense, will tighten its grip and its strategic abilities in the Middle East in general, and particularly in the ‘Shiite spectrum.’ This is very bad for the State of Israel and it is also bad for the Arab Gulf states (which supported Clinton).”
Regarding Iran, Trump will probably not cancel the nuclear agreement. However over here they feel strongly that it’s possible that he will accept Israel’s requests to tighten the intelligence supervision on Iran and to respond to any violation on its part with serious sanctions and/or military action.
According to Ben Yishai, the Trump administration and Congress will “also generously accept Israel’s arming requests so that the IDF would be able to respond with all its might in case Iran makes a breakthrough toward a nuclear bomb.”
As for the “peace talks,” analysts here agree that, the two-state-for-two-people formula will likely enter a deep freeze for a long time, at least until there is a leadership change with the Palestinians. As I mentioned above, Trump will probably not try to impose any solution or even peace negotiations, certainly not based on Israeli concessions only.
As of this writing, we’re still waiting to find out who the Secretary of State will be, and if that person will have the skills to re-establish respect for, and confidence in the United States as a world leader to be trusted and respected in a very volatile Middle East…
I hope so.
Agree or disagree, that’s my opinion.
Lt. Col. (IDF res) Gil Elan is president and CEO of the Southwest Jewish Congress, and a Middle East analyst. Email: gil@swjc.org
Upcoming briefings and SWJC events are listed at: www.swjc.org.
DISCLAIMER: Opinions are the writer’s, and do not represent SWJC directors, officers or members.

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Around The Town: Blessing of the pets

Around The Town: Blessing of the pets

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

img_2882 img_2878web img_2880web

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Blessing of the pets

On Oct. 31, members of the Fort Worth and Tarrant County Jewish Community gathered on the back field of Congregation Ahavath Sholom to bless their pets and animals.
The congregation was of several North Texas synagogues that honored furry, feathery and scaly friends in honor of Parshat Noach. Rabbi Andrew Bloom and Cantor Shoshana Abrams led the blessing.
Pet food donations and monetary contributions were collected for Fort Worth’s Don’t Forget to Feed Me organization.

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Meet the Jews in Donald Trump’s inner circle

Meet the Jews in Donald Trump’s inner circle

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

Ivanka Trump (top left), Jason Greenblatt (top right), Steven Mnuchin (bottom left) and Boris Epshteyn (bottom right)

Ivanka Trump (top left), Jason Greenblatt (top right), Steven Mnuchin (bottom left) and Boris Epshteyn (bottom right)

By Josefin Dolsten
JTA

President-elect Donald Trump has a complicated history with Jews. On the one hand, his daughter Ivanka converted to Orthodox Judaism before marrying Jared Kushner, and he’s spoken fondly about having Jewish grandchildren.
On the other, some of Trump’s supporters identify with anti-Semitic elements of the alt-right movement, and he’s a favorite of prominent white supremacist David Duke. On Sunday, Trump appointed Stephen Bannon — the former chairman of Breitbart News, a site with ties to the alt-right — as his chief strategist in a move that sparked swift criticism from the Anti-Defamation League.
Still, Trump’s cadre of advisers is not short on Jews. While the real estate magnate and former reality TV star may not officially appoint family members to his Cabinet because of federal anti-nepotism regulations, here’s a look at his Jewish advisers, their views and possible roles in his administration.

Jason Greenblatt

Greenblatt has worked as a real-estate lawyer for Trump for 19 years, and he is one of two Jewish lawyers whom Trump has said he would appoint as his Israel advisers. An Orthodox Jew and Yeshiva University graduate, Greenblatt studied at a West Bank yeshiva in the mid-1980s and even did armed guard duty there.
The father of six from Teaneck, New Jersey, does not have any political experience. Greenblatt has said he speaks with people involved in the Israeli government but has not spoken to any Palestinians since his yeshiva studies. He has cited the American Israel Public Affairs Committee as one of his main sources for staying informed about the Jewish state, and helped draft Trump’s speech at the lobbying group’s annual conference in March.
Greenblatt, who has said he supports the two-state solution, has implied that Trump will take a more laissez-faire approach to peace building.
“He is not going to impose any solution on Israel,” Greenblatt told Israel’s Army Radio last week. He also said that Trump “does not view Jewish settlements as an obstacle to peace.”

David Friedman

Alongside Greenblatt, Trump named Friedman, 57, as an Israel adviser. Friedman, a bankruptcy expert and partner at the Kasowitz law firm in New York, is the president-elect’s longtime attorney. The son of a Conservative rabbi with a family history of ties to Republican presidential candidates — his family hosted Ronald Reagan for a Shabbat lunch in 1984, the year he won re-election — Friedman lives in Woodmere, New York, and owns a house in Jerusalem’s Talbiyeh neighborhood, according to Haaretz.

David Friedman

David Friedman

Friedman has expressed doubt about the future of the two-state solution, traditionally a pillar of bipartisan U.S. policy in the region. Prior to the Republican Party passing a platform that omitted references to the two-state solution, he said it might be time for the party to reject the concept.
“The two-state solution might be one answer, but I don’t think it’s the only answer anymore,” he said in July.
Friedman has also said that annexing the West Bank would not damage Israel’s status as a Jewish state.

Jared Kushner

Kushner — the 35-year-old scion of one of New York’s most prominent real estate families and, since 2009, the husband of Trump’s daughter Ivanka — played a crucial role in the president-elect’s campaign, especially with regards to Israel. He worked on Trump’s speech to the AIPAC annual policy conference that earned Trump a standing ovation, and helped plan a trip to Israel for his father-in-law last year. (Trump canceled the trip after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu slammed his call to ban Muslim immigration to the United States.)

Jared Kishner

Jared Kushner

Trump appears to be smitten with Kushner, often referring to his “fantastic” son-in-law when boasting of his pro-Israel credentials. Kushner, an Orthodox Jew who lives with his wife and their three children on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, may have become a household name during the campaign, but he’s no stranger to the limelight. In 2006, at 25, he bought the Observer newspaper. Two years later he became CEO of his father’s company, Kushner Properties, four years after his father was sent to jail for tax evasion, illegal campaign donations and witness tampering. In 2015, Fortune named Kushner to its 40 Under 40 list, its “annual ranking of the most influential young people in business.”

Ivanka Trump

Trump’s daughter Ivanka, 35, who converted to Orthodox Judaism, has served as the polished, softer face of her father’s campaign. A successful businesswoman whose brand is centered around empowering working women, she stood by him when recordings were released that caught the president-elect bragging about sexually assaulting women.
Ivanka has reportedly tried — not always successfully — to have her father tone down or walk back some of his most inflammatory remarks, including having called Mexican immigrants rapists, according to New York magazine.
She is the founder of the Ivanka Trump Collection, a fashion and lifestyle brand, and serves as executive vice president of development and acquisitions for the Trump Organization, her father’s company. Ivanka, who gave birth to her third child in March, belongs to the Upper East Side Orthodox synagogue Kehilath Jeshurun with Kushner and has described her family as “pretty observant.” She made Fortune’s 40 Under 40 list in 2014, a year before her husband did.

Boris Epshteyn

Epshteyn, 34, is a Republican political strategist and staunch defender of Trump who has appeared as the president-elect’s surrogate on major TV networks over 100 times, The New York Times reported.
A New York-based investment banker and finance attorney, Epshteyn worked as a communications aide for Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaign in 2008, focusing his efforts on the Arizona senator’s running mate, then-Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, whom Trump is reportedly considering for interior secretary, according to Politico.
Epshteyn, a Moscow native, moved to the United States in 1993. A fluent Russian speaker who has moderated a panel encouraging investment in Moscow, he may serve as an asset for Trump in navigating relations with Russia — Trump has expressed his desire to improve ties with President Vladimir Putin.
Then again, Epshteyn’s temper may make him less of an asset to Trump. TV hosts described him as “very combative” and “abrasive,” and in 2014, Epshteyn was charged with misdemeanor assault after he was involved in a bar tussle. The charge was dropped after Epshteyn agreed to undergo anger management training and perform community service.

Stephen Miller

Miller, 30, has played a crucial role in Trump’s campaign, helping to warm up crowds at rallies and drafting speeches, including the president-elect’s acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention.

Stephen Miller

Stephen Miller

Miller, who has described himself as “a practicing Jew,” joined the Trump campaign in January, quickly rising through the ranks to become “one of the most important people in the campaign,” as Trump’s campaign manager told The Wall Street Journal. Previously he worked for seven years as an aide to Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., helping the lawmaker draft materials to kill a bipartisan Senate immigration reform bill. Some of Sessions’ arguments contain similarities to Trump’s harsh and often controversial statements on the issue, such as calling for building a wall on the Mexican border and banning Muslim immigration to the country.
Though Miller grew up in a liberal Jewish home in Southern California, he was drawn to conservative causes early. As a high school student he wrote a letter to the editor of a local paper in which he slammed his school for providing free condoms to students and for making announcements both in English and Spanish, among other things.

Steven Mnuchin

Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs executive, worked as Trump’s national finance chairman during the campaign with the aim of raising more than $1 billion for the candidate.
Trump and Mnuchin have been friends for 15 years, and prior to being in charge of Trump’s campaign finances, Mnuchin served as an adviser. Part of what The New York Times describes as one of Manhattan’s elite “most influential families,” Mnuchin and his father both got rich working at Goldman Sachs. The younger Mnuchin also co-founded the entertainment company RatPac-Dune Entertainment, which has worked on such Hollywood hits as “Avatar” and “Black Swan.”
Some saw Trump teaming up with Mnuchin as unusual, considering that the real-estate mogul had consistently bashed Goldman Sachs. But it didn’t seem to get in the way of a good working relationship — Trump is now reportedly considering Mnuchin for the position of Treasury secretary, according to Politico.

Lewis Eisenberg

Eisenberg, the private equity chief for Granite Capital International Group, serves as finance chairman for the Republican National Committee. He was one of a small group of Republican Jewish Coalition board members who did not flee from Trump’s candidacy, and was a major contributor to groups backing Trump’s election — only nine of 55 RJC board members gave to Trump. Alongside Mnuchin, he worked to raise funds for the candidate.

Lewis Eisenberg

Lewis Eisenberg

Eisenberg grew up in New Jersey, the Forward reported, and he has been floated as a possible pick for commerce secretary in the Trump administration. He was the chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey at the time of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center.
Eisenberg told JTA that he was “extremely enthusiastic” about a Trump presidency, calling him “a strong advocate for Israel, a strong advocate for justice and order.”

Michael Glassner

Glassner was not new to Republican presidential campaigns when Trump appointed him last year to serve as his national political director. He worked as director of vice presidential operations for McCain’s 2008 campaign and ran Geogre W. Bush’s campaign in Iowa in 2000. He has also worked with Palin and Sen. Bob Dole, a former presidential candidate.

Michael Glassner

Michael Glassner

Like many of Trump’s Jewish advisers, Glassner is outspoken in his support of Israel. Prior to joining the Trump campaign, he worked as the political director for AIPAC’s Southwest Regional. Glassner has praised the anti-establishment movement,  and he told Jewish Insider that his experience with Palin and the fact that he lives in New Jersey, not Washington, D.C., made him a good fit for Trump’s political outsider message. He also served as a senior adviser to Eisenberg when he was the Port Authority chairman.

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Several charities rise to top of ‘begging drawer’

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

I have a system for monitoring solicitations. All year long, I put every request I receive into what I call my “begging drawer.” Then, whenever I feel moved to do so, I go through it and toss out duplicates (there are always many).
After Halloween, I make final determinations on who stays and who goes — not always easy — and in November, I start writing checks. By the end of December, I’ve emptied the drawer (and sometimes the checking account!) and I’m ready for the New Year and the income tax deadline.
Every year, one charity rises to the top of my pile. It’s one of the only ones that may eventually go out of business because its primary work will be done. This is the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, a main source of support for those now-aged Gentiles overseas who put their own lives at risk to save Jews during the Holocaust. When they’re gone, there will be no further need for this kind of support.
But today, there is still much to be done. Currently, JFR sends funds every month to about 425 old and needy rescuers in 20 different countries. The money helps them pay for food, medicine and housing costs. It has distributed more than $37 million since being founded in 1986 by the late Rabbi Harold Schulweis.
I save the JFR’s Rosh Hashanah “begging letter” every year because it always highlights someone who gets the organization’s support. This year, the spotlight was on an entire family — the Voronieckys. Their home is now in Lithuania, but their town was part of Poland in September 1941. The Germans had entered that part of the world three months earlier and ordered all Jews to forced labor. Then, on the eve of Rosh Hashanah, they began liquidation. Saul Leyman and his friends, three Schneider brothers, ran for help to Maria Voroniecky, who had worked for the Schneiders before the war. She, her husband Josef and their four teenage children took the men in, and dug a hiding place in the floor of their barn. Not many days later, the men learned of the mass liquidation that had taken all of their relatives.
Talk about heroism! One night a Nazi came to the farm, accused the family of hiding Jews, and severely beat Viktor, one of the Voroniecky sons. But he refused to betray those four men, who stayed with them for three whole years until Soviet liberation in 1944. In 2000, Yad Vashem recognized all the Voronieckys as Righteous Among the Gentiles. The rest of that family is long gone, but two of Viktor’s sisters are still alive and receiving JFR support today.
There are, of course, organizations that similarly support Jewish survivors themselves. Now seeking recognition is The Survivor Mitzvah Project, which has the support of many famed names in the entertainment world, including Mayim Bialik, Ed Asner, Lainie Kazan and Elliott Gould. For those who want something more than a good feeling for their contributions, SMP is fundraising with a glitzy initiative: in cooperation with jewelry designer Dominique Cohen of Beverly Hills, it’s now offering a diamond-accented unisex bracelet, engraved with the name of one survivor; a contribution of $1,800 “buys” a bracelet and will support that survivor for an entire year. The organization’s founder, Zane Buzby, has virtually the same message about the recipients of its charity that JFR delivers with requests to fund those it helps: “These men and women, now in their 80s and 90s, are ill, isolated, and lacking the means to buy food, medicine, heat and shelter. They are in urgent need.”
However you decide on who will receive your 2016 charitable contributions, I hope you’ll remember the Holocaust and assist both Jewish survivors and Righteous Gentiles with some end-of-the-year giving.  Both the organizations I’ve mentioned here are certified non-profit public charities. For further information, go to www.jfr.org and www.survivormitzvah.org. You will thank yourself.

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Weinberg’s community reach ‘evident, endless’

Weinberg’s community reach ‘evident, endless’

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

The Weinberg family has always stood behind each other, and when it comes to their wife and mother Wende – they couldn’t glow more. (left to right) Adina, Gilad and Danielle Zubery, Rabbi Stefan, Jordana and (seated) Wende Weinberg.

The Weinberg family has always stood behind each other, and when it comes to their wife and mother Wende – they couldn’t glow more. (left to right) Adina, Gilad and Danielle Zubery, Rabbi Stefan, Jordana and (seated) Wende Weinberg.

Life is about the moments and if you look, you will find in each child when they ‘get it,’” said Wende Weinberg, Director of Jewish Studies and Programs at Levine Academy, a pillar at the school for more than 30 years. Shown, of her legions of Levine students, also here with Rabbi Michael Katzman, (from left to right) Abigail Khalameizer, Ella Frydman, Lauren Hazan, Avery Wren, Shayna Rubinstein, Jonathan Pershes, Joshua Saland and Aiden Mintskovsky.

Life is about the moments and if you look, you will find in each child when they ‘get it,’” said Wende Weinberg, Director of Jewish Studies and Programs at Levine Academy, a pillar at the school for more than 30 years. Shown, of her legions of Levine students, also here with Rabbi Michael Katzman, (from left to right) Abigail Khalameizer, Ella Frydman, Lauren Hazan, Avery Wren, Shayna Rubinstein, Jonathan Pershes, Joshua Saland and Aiden Mintskovsky.

Dec. 15 ceremony will honor educator for countless hours spent helping youth turn into confident, ethical adults

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

A woman of valor — a true aishet chayil — Wende Weinberg, who has taught Dallas-area children from the aleph-bet to the tying of the knots on a tallis, will be paid tribute at 6 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 15, at the Renaissance Dallas Richardson Hotel.

 From her first visit to Israel in 1973, when she was just a bit older than her Levine charges, to the hundreds she has toured through the country on their own first trips, it’s the experiences and the children, who make visiting her homeland away from home, always a “first.”

From her first visit to Israel in 1973, when she was just a bit older than her Levine charges, to the hundreds she has toured through the country on their own first trips, it’s the experiences and the children, who make visiting her homeland away from home, always a “first.”

“Wende has touched so many and it’s our truest honor to pay tribute to our rock and our leader who is such a light — always warm and welcoming,” said Staci Rubin, who with her husband Paul and Kim and Dan Gold are co-chairing the event. “Her essence has woven a solid foundation into our lives and her love of Jewish everything — is evident and endless.”
A Philadelphia, Pennsylvania native who moved to Los Angeles as a toddler, Wende is the daughter of Kay and Marty Waterman, both of blessed memory, and the sister of Debbe and Bruce. A product of Los Angeles’ public school system, a graduate of Hamilton High School, she attended religious school at Temple Beth Am, her family’s congregation until she was 13. At a time when many children cease their formal Jewish instruction, she made the choice to continue her studies then at Sinai Temple and the LA Hebrew High School.
With degrees from California State Northridge, in Early Childhood Education and Jewish Studies, Wende earned masters degrees from the University of Judaism in Day School Education and in school administration. There she met her b’shert, the future Rabbi Stefan Weinberg, when the two shared a halacha (Jewish laws) course.
The couple married in 1982 and, while Rabbi Weinberg finished his degree at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York, Wende taught kindergarten at the Solomon Schechter School of Westchester and religious school at Beth El New Rochelle. From 1984 to 1988 the couple first made Dallas their home, he an assistant rabbi at Congregation Shearith Israel and later as CSI’s Associate Rabbi from 1990 until 1998; she at Solomon Schechter Academy (now Levine Academy). During the interim (1998-1990), he served Temple Beth Zion in Royal Palm Beach, Florida, and Wende was that congregation’s religious school principal. In 1998, the couple became the founding rabbi and rebbetzin of Congregation Anshai Torah, growing the congregation from 125 member families, to its current 540. Partners always, they’re a team of strength personified.

Wende Weinberg’s impact in the community comes from her roles at Levine Academy, Anshai Torah and touching students – one to one — here in 2010, helping Jonah Silverthorn learn to tie the knots — in fact, tying him forever to Jewish tradition — as together they created his own tallit.

Wende Weinberg’s impact in the community comes from her roles at Levine Academy, Anshai Torah and touching students – one to one — here in 2010, helping Jonah Silverthorn learn to tie the knots — in fact, tying him forever to Jewish tradition — as together they created his own tallit.

Finding spark in each child’s life

“Wende is the most incredible partner I could imagine; a wonderful wife, a dedicated mother and rebbetzin who is the epitome of a role model,” said Rabbi Weinberg. “She opens our home to everyone — her students and the members of our congregation and community. She supports our daily minyan and has 35 people for a yontif meal — always comfortable in her role, always right by my side. We’re blessed to have found each other.”
Rabbi Weinberg says the way she engages and is patient is the same as when the couple began.
“I’ve always been intrigued by her ability to find that spark in each child that translates into the child’s sense of being,” he said. “Her determination, her stubbornness, her magnificent smile and her passion for everything Jewish have coalesced into the person that I love and that I have been privileged to share my life and create our wonderful family with. She from the big city and I from a small town, have woven together a life that has brought us so much joy.”
In 1984 Wende was hired by Rabbi Ed Feinstein, an assistant rabbi at CSI and Solomon Shechter Academy’s founding director, to teach first and third grades, and shortly thereafter to lead the Judaic Studies department. She has, but for the two years the Weinbergs were in Florida, given Dallas her all.
“The idea of a non-Orthodox day school was new and we made it up as we went along but Wende definitely had an idea of what day school looked like. Wende has always talked to and listened to the needs of her students, her teachers, everyone she comes in contact with, making sure she knows the need. She has made sure that everyone knows they are a part of a People, responsible for their community. That is strength,” said Rabbi Feinstein who left Dallas in 1990 to direct Camp Ramah in California and, since 1993, has served at Valley Beth Shalom in Encino, California. He has remained close to the Weinbergs and many in Dallas’ Jewish community. “When you teach, you put yourself and your soul into the world. To gather together to express the value and how she has shaped our lives is marvelous.”

Taking youth to Israel

Among the imprints Wende has made are the hundreds of eighth-grade students she has taken to Israel since 2004, always reflecting on her own first visit, in 1973 through the Los Angeles Bureau of Jewish Education’s Summer Ulpan program — then, nearly the same age as her own charges. “Every year it’s a different ‘first’ because it’s the kids who make the trip. One child said ‘I’m in Jerusalem and I don’t know if I gave enough to my davening,’ or the time a windstorm stopped the cable cars on Masada and we couldn’t get right down and we huddled together in a cave. It’s when a young lady who was so emotional, again at Masada, and there happened to be a sofer (scribe) there who wrote her a bracha on a piece of parchment, he gave one to her and one to me – mine still a treasure. Israel is a fantastic place, but it’s not always the moments, but the moments within,” reminisces Wende.
Wende smiles at the memory of her first Schechter trip to Israel when one student, born in South Africa, and she were delayed on the way home because his paperwork – which got him into the country, wasn’t deemed acceptable for his return. “I sent the group home and, because it was just before Shabbat we stayed the weekend while his parents couriered to Israel the necessary papers. For him, it was an adventure. Extra time at the beach and museums — it was for me too — one of the best moments. Life is about the moments and how you manage them,” she said.
Despite battling cancer since June 2015, Wende — never one to miss teachable moments, or a trip to Israel, led last year’s eighth-grade trip.

Results not always immediately evident

“When I think back on my teachers’ wisdom, I hope — but am not sure — I took full advantage of the learning but something in me then knew this would be my life,” said Wende, who recalls her Hebrew High teachers, Rabbi Elliot Dorff and Rabbi Joel Rembaum and others now well-renowned, then beginning their careers. “If you look, you will find in each child when they ‘get it.’ ”
“Getting it,” for Wende comes in many forms. It’s in the student who years later became a rabbi, another whose child’s brit milah she attended. It’s in the phone calls “just because” a memory came to the forefront, and from the email by a student, now at college, who wrote after the high holidays that, in Wende’s merit, she’d attended services for the first time in years. “She realized how much her education had given her Jewishly and of how Judaism is the same, wherever you are in the world,” said the glowing influencer. “You don’t often see the impact until years later but we see Jewish leadership, community leadership; in AIPAC, in BBYO, in USY. Whether it’s religious or cultural — the connection remains.”
That connection is fueled by her passion — a word used to describe Wende by everyone interviewed for this story — a word that hasn’t wavered for one moment.
“Wende has and always will impart on the students, faculty and parents of Levine — and reaching far into Dallas’ Jewish community, a dedication of menschlichkeit that is framed in her joyful, Jewish spirit and soul. She is indefatigable, impressively committed to every aspect of our school, as tireless and dedicated as anyone, and she’s made the educational experience for so many one for the rest of their lives,” said Levine Academy Head of School Tom Elieff. “To begin a sustainable endowment that will ensure the fullness and comprehensiveness of everything Wende is about, is an exquisite reflection of who she is to us all.”
The Wende Weinberg Endowment Fund for Jewish Education will serve as an ongoing tribute to her extraordinary dedication, ensuring that children experience the richness of Levine Academy’s Day School Education.
“Wende is our lev and neshama — our heart and soul,” said Randy Fleisher, the father of two graduates and a Levine Academy past-president who co-chairs the Endowment Fund with Sandy Haymann Marks. “There aren’t enough ‘thank yous’ to be said to Wende but the commitment of this endowment, of all those she has touched, will allow us to deliver in continuing all she brings.”
From Israel study and holiday celebrations to ensuring that children are taught by the most highly skilled and qualified educators, every donation to the fund will continue Wende’s commitment to children for generations to come. Donations made before Dec. 5 will be recognized in the tribute evening’s program.

Passing on her values to next generation

“We have increased the quality of teaching and our program through the years, elevating our Judaic program so that it’s not an add-on, but that in teaching our tradition, we give the very greatest level of excellence,” said Wende. “We have grown in the last 30 years but, no matter the changes, at our core, we’re a family, maintaining the value of how we come together as a family.”
Among the greatest of honors is the respect children have for their parents. It is mirrored and apparent in her own three daughters, Danielle, Jordana and Adina.
All three young women are graduates of Levine Academy and Jewish high schools. Danielle, a high-tech sector account manager, who made aliyah four years ago and her husband Gilad Zubery are expecting their first child next spring. “I feel incredibly privileged to look up to my mom who has provided me with a strong Jewish identity, a set of values that continue to guide me and a sense of passion that touches every aspect of my life,” said Danielle. “Having watched her help build our amazing Jewish community, I’m proud of everything that she’s accomplished and to be the daughter that looks up to her.”
Jordana, following in Wende’s footsteps but forging her own path, is a physical education teacher at the Denver Jewish day school. “It is easy to see where my passion for education comes from. I’m extremely fortunate to have such an intelligent, creative and strong role model. She’s ‘wonder woman’ and her ability to get things done, after a long day, still making sure to get dinner on the table, and remembering to call to say ‘hi,’ are all incredible,” said Jordana. “They said the apple didn’t fall very far from the tree when I began teaching at a Jewish day school over five years ago and I’ve never thought twice about any other forum. The solid foundation my mom has instilled and laid out for me over the course of my life is so strong. I’m so fortunate to have her as a role model and influence and I continue to be amazed by her every day.”
Adina who graduated with a degree in Jewish Studies and Communications, from Wende’s alma mater, now the American Jewish University, has returned to Dallas. “To talk about mom is to talk about a true commitment to Judaism and it’s continuation through the generations. She has spent most of her life dedicated to teaching the values and beauty of Judaism to each generation of young Jewish adults in Dallas. I’ve spent most of my life, an eager recipient of these lessons and I’ve watched and learned from her how to create a beautiful Jewish home and community and how to incorporate these values into my everyday life and identity to make the most of my life,” she said. “Among so many other incredible qualities, she is a vision of humility, strength, kindness and generosity.”
The event committee is producing a tribute book, co-chaired by Stacy Barnett and Lauren Busch and the community-at-large is asked to share memories, sentiments of love and gratitude – in the form of prose, letters, photos or artwork, all of which will be reproduced in a hard-bound book with copies given just to Wende and her family. There is no charge to submit messages, which should be emailed in JPG, word.doc, or in the base of an email message to tributestowende@gmail.com no later than Monday, Nov. 21.
“Wende has helped sew the fabric of our children’s Jewish lives and this evening of tribute and the everlasting endowment fund created in Wende’s honor allows us all the opportunity to share her very essence,” said Sandy Haymann Marks. “She has sewn that fabric and believe me, she is an incredible seamstress.”
Dinner reservations are $180/ticket with $54/tickets available to Solomon Schechter Academy/Levine Academy alumni under the age of 30 and current students. To RSVP, to donate to the Wende Weinberg Endowment Fund, or for more information visit http://bit.ly/2fRzQ2Y or email mgendason@levineacademy.org.

 

 

*****

 

Weinberg’s blog
Wende has blogged extensively about her journey on CaringBridge.org. Her blog is available after signing up for the site at www.caringbridge.org/visit/wendeweinberg.

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Texas legislators file bills against BDS

Texas legislators file bills against BDS

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

Photo: JCRC State Representative Phil King (R-Weatherford) met with Zev Shuklin (right) and Charles Pulman (not pictured) at a meeting in Austin on Nov. 3 about the anti-BDS bill that he filed in the Texas House on Monday. Other Jewish organizations also attended. Senator Brandon Creighton filed a similar bill in the Texas Senate.

Photo: JCRC
State Representative Phil King (R-Weatherford) met with Zev Shuklin (right) and Charles Pulman (not pictured) at a meeting in Austin on Nov. 3 about the anti-BDS bill that he filed in the Texas House on Monday. Other Jewish organizations also attended. Senator Brandon Creighton filed a similar bill in the Texas Senate.

BDS-sympathizing companies won’t receive any public funds if passed

By Sean Shapiro
Special to the TJP

Companion bills were filed in the Texas Senate and House on Monday that would prohibit the use of state public funds for companies that are involved with the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement.

Brandon Creighton

Brandon Creighton

BDS is a global campaign attempting to increase political and economic pressure on Israel through boycotts, divestment of investments and international sanctions. While it isn’t officially stated by BDS, it’s believed that one of the target goals is delegitimizing the State of Israel.
State Representative Phil King (R-Weatherford), will sponsor House Bill 89, while State Senator Brandon Creighton (R-Conroe) will sponsor Senate Bill 134.
“This is going to be a very bipartisan bill,” King said. “We’re going to get a lot of Democrat support as well as Republicans. This sends a strong statement that Texas stands with its friends in Israel, and (BDS) directly contradicts state public policy.”
King said there were four reasons he co-wrote the bill with Creighton and he laid those out for the TJP on Monday.

  • 1. “As a Christian my religious heritage is linked to the nation of Israel and the Jewish people.”
  • 2. “As an American, our national security is dependent on our relationship with Israel, who, most of the time, is our only true friend in that part of the world.”
  • 3. “As a Texas legislator, Texas has a significant economic relationship with Israel. We do a lot of business with them. And also, we have a significant Jewish population and this issue is very important to them.”
  • 4. “Bottom line, it’s just the right thing to do.”

The Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC) of the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas and AJC are collaborating closely with King and Creighton to provide assistance and support of this upcoming legislation. The JCRC will hold a meeting Thursday, Nov. 17, with local Jewish organizations and involved individuals to craft communal strategy for outreach to legislators to support the anti-BDS legislation.
“Israel is an oasis of freedom in the Middle East and our nation’s most valuable ally in the region,” Creighton said. “Israel’s economic strength is reflective of essential values they share with Texas, so people of good conscience should be encouraging them, not stifling their success. It’s time for Texas to send a strong message of unity with Israel.”
King said other states have passed a similar bill and he’s confident it will get done. However, he does recognize the challenges that come with it.
“It is not an easy piece of legislation to pass, because pension matters and others don’t like being directed how to or not invest funds,” King said. “And then government entities don’t like being told who they and cannot contract with. But this is good policy for the state of Texas, and so I know Senator Creighton and I, and others that will be co-sponsors will all be working very hard to get this finished up in the law during the next session.”
Monday was the first day to file legislation and the House will convene Jan. 10. King expects hearings to occur in late February and hopes to get the bill onto the floor within a month and have it passed before the end of session in May.
“I have a high level of confidence we are going to get this passed for Texas,” King said.
The anti-BDS legislation, among other issues, will be highlighted at the Jewish Communities’ Advocacy Day at the State: Legislative Mission to Austin organized by the Dallas JCRC on Feb. 22, 2017. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss the bill with influential legislators at the daylong event. Among invited attendees are Governor Greg Abbott, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick, and House Speaker Joe Straus.

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Dallas Doings: SNP Honors, Anshai donation, volunteer of year

Dallas Doings: SNP Honors, Anshai donation, volunteer of year

Posted on 17 November 2016 by admin

Submitted photo Dallas Fire-Rescue’s Brad London (left) accepts a donation from Congregation Anshai Torah Rabbi Stefan Weinberg on behalf of the fallen officers from this summer’s shooting of police officers.

Submitted photo
Dallas Fire-Rescue’s Brad London (left) accepts a donation from Congregation Anshai Torah Rabbi Stefan Weinberg on behalf of the fallen officers from this summer’s shooting of police officers.

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Spring debut of ‘SNP Honors ‘Celebration

seymour-laura-bw

Seymour

Reappointed Chairman of the Special Needs Partnership (SNP) at Jewish Family Service, Louis Zweig, announced the upcoming, spring debut of the “SNP Honors” Celebration. This exciting event will take place at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 2, 2017 in the Beck Sanctuary at Shearith Israel.
The inaugural program will pay tribute to two outstanding role models and contributors who have advanced the special needs movement throughout the Dallas Jewish community.
To be honored are Laura Seymour, longtime Director of Camp and Youth Services at the Aaron Family JCC, and Eileen Kreisler, creator of the Lomdim program at Temple Emanu-El and driver of numerous special needs programs in area preschools, day schools and religious schools. “Both are highly deserving of our gratitude for making Dallas a more inclusive city and for all of their efforts that have positively impacted so many deserving individuals and families,” emphasized Zweig.

Eileen Kreisler

Eileen Kreisler

Helping to launch this highly anticipated special needs fundraiser, featuring luscious desserts, flavorful noshes, Israeli wine and tasty whiskey, are Co-Chairs Barbi Cohen and Amy Harberg. Serving as honorary co-chairs are Susan and Martin Golman and Barbara and Stan Levenson.
In addition to the sale of admission tickets, valued sponsorships and generous contributions to the SNP, the Zweig Family and the Gladys Golman/Faye Dallen Special Needs Fund are combining interests to advance the first $10,000 toward an achievable goal of raising $150,000. Their gift follows nearly a decade of annual contributions, most recently generated from the Fund’s annual bowling tournament that concluded earlier this year.
Among the various programs and services benefiting from the “SNP Honors” celebration, the following are to be funded:

A full-time JFS Community Organizer

 

Special needs resources to work in day schools, preschools and religious schools in collaboration with JFS
Monthly Inclusion Experiences and PERK programs designed to educate students, teachers, parents and community leaders.
Louis underscored that “the support and participation of our entire community will be highly valued and genuinely appreciated.”
For more information about SNP Honors, please visit www.JFSSNPHonors.org.
— Submitted by Leah Guskin

Anshai presents donation to families of lost officers

Dallas’ Fire-Rescue Department Station 27’s Brad London, a driver/engineer and paramedic, represented the men and women in blue in symbolically receiving a donation from Congregation Anshai Torah’s Rabbi Stefan Weinberg just before Kabbalat Shabbat services Oct. 27. A fundraising appeal was made  to the congregation before Kol Nidre, to support the families of Dallas’ five slain officers: Lorne Ahrens, Michael Krol, Michael Smith, Brent Thompson, and Patrick Zamarripa. The mitzvah is an extension of Anshai Torah’s participation in the Conservative movement’s support of Project Isaiah through which donations are made to a local food bank — a reminder of the obligation to care for those who need our help throughout the community.
“The gravity of Yom Kippur reminds us that while our attention is focused on our own personal transgressions we are inextricably bound to the welfare of our greater community.  The pain experienced by the families of the five slain officers will remain in our thoughts and prayers,” said Rabbi Weinberg.
“This past Kol Nidre we encouraged everyone to actively support the grieving families as they struggle to find a way to move forward.  A few piggy banks were emptied and the breadth of support demonstrated by the congregation reminded everyone of our civic responsibilities and the tremendous gratitude we owe our policemen and firefighters who protect us on a daily basis.”
London, the son of Cheryl, of blessed memory and Murray London, the husband of Audra, father of Vivian and Zachary, and brother of Marc, became a bar mitzvah under Rabbi Weinberg’s charge a few years ago.
The reunion sweet as a number of family members belong to Congregation Anshai Torah, the congregants in attendance proud of their hometown hero.
“This is a career that each of us as firefighters, paramedics and police officers, and others we work with have chosen to serve our community that we love. I was taught at a very young age by some of the great rabbis in our community about living a life of giving tzedakah, of giving back, whether it be through monetary donations or through service,” said London, a member of the Dallas Fire Department for close to 16 years, nodding in Rabbi Weinberg’s direction.
“I chose service and I get to do that every day and I get to see a lot of great things and a lot of things no one should see on a daily basis.  This contribution will go a long way to support the families of the police officers who risked their lives.  That’s what we do — it’s what we do every day.”
— Submitted by Deb Silverthorn

Rubenstein Named 2016 Volunteers in Plano Supervisor of the Year

Becky Rubenstein has been named the 2016 Volunteers In Plano Supervisor of the Year. For more than 12 years, it has been all teens all the time for Teen Court Supervisor Becky Rubenstein. As juvenile court manager, she has worked with hundreds of teen volunteers — coordinating, training, and mentoring them as jurors and attorneys in the Municipal Court’s Teen Court program. The program allows juvenile Class C misdemeanor offenders to pay for their citation by completing community service hours. Defendants’ cases are presented to a jury of their peers and volunteer teen attorneys represent defendants and teen jurors assign community service hours.

Submitted photo Becky Rubenstein has worked for more than 12 years as teen court supervisor. Chief Administrative Judge Don Stevenson attributed much of the growth of that program to Rubenstein.

Submitted photo
Becky Rubenstein has worked for more than 12 years as teen court supervisor. Chief Administrative Judge Don Stevenson attributed much of the growth of that program to Rubenstein.

Rubenstein, a Fort Worth native, is married to Jason and is the mother of Brayden. She is the daughter of Barbara and Jeffrey Gilbert and a graduate of Southwest High School and Southwest Texas State University (now just Texas State). She grew up at Congregation Ahavath Sholom, a member of BBYO’s Alton Silver and Beth El Congregation Fort Worth’s TOFTY chapters, at Greene Family Camp, and as a participant on URJ Garin Greene in Israel ’94. A former volunteer herself in the Fort Worth Teen Court, she previously served as Teen Court Coordinator for the City of Arlington.
Chief Administrative Judge Don Stevenson attributes the growth of the teen court program to her continuous efforts.
“Through the dozen years that I have worked with Becky, I have seen her demonstrate an amazing rapport with teenagers of all backgrounds,” he said. “She communicates with each young man or woman as an individual and senses whether cajoling, additional instruction, praise, or critique will motivate them to do their best in the courtroom.”
Through Rubenstein’s leadership, the Plano Teen Court has assembled moot court teams and participated in North Texas Regional Moot Court competitions sponsored by the Texas A&M School of Law in Fort Worth. With her encouragement and support, the Plano team consistently progressed and won the overall competition two years ago.
“My favorite experience is to see the students who volunteer develop and grow. Over the years I have seen some young students who come to teen court afraid to speak up, barely giving any eye contact, and trying to sink into their chairs and appear invisible. With some training, constructive criticism, and someone to believe in them, I have watched them grow and transform into amazing critical thinkers, debaters and court advocates,” said Rubenstein.  “It is then when they discover their voice and confidence that they grow into true leaders in the courtroom, and that is when I am most proud to have helped them on the journey.”
— Submitted by Deb Silverthorn

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JCC annual Senior Expo returns Nov. 15

Posted on 11 November 2016 by admin

Free Event, Presented by Golden Outlook, Offers Resources for Seniors
and Those With Older Family Members Plus Health & Wellness Demo Classes

WHAT:
The J’s annual Senior Expo, presented by Golden Outlook, is a free resource fair for seniors and those with senior family members. Attendees can explore a wide range of local services available to older individuals or stop by a “Hospitality Suite” including the Hot Chocolate Lounge hosted by Total Hearing, the Popcorn & Snacks Suite hosted by The Legacy or the Green Screen Photo Booth hosted by The Overture Plano. Free bag lunch will be provided to the first 100 attendees courtesy of Dallas Jewish Funerals. Entertainment will be provided by Marty Ruiz. Senior Expo attendees will also be treated to nutrition education, health screenings, flu and pneumonia vaccines, brain exercises to boost memory, giveaways and more. New this year, guests can try FREE fitness classes including Chair Yoga, Chair Pilates, Silver Sneakers BOOM or Broadway-Style Line Dancing (see schedule below). This is the perfect opportunity to see firsthand all the services available in North Texas for active seniors.

WHEN:
Tuesday, November 15
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Demo Class Schedule
9:30 to 10:00 a.m. –  Chair Pilates
10:15 to 10:45 a.m. – Chair Yoga Chi
11 to 11:45 a.m. – Line Dancing
1 to 1:30 p.m. – Silver Sneakers BOOM

WHERE:
Aaron Family Jewish Community Center
7900 Northaven Rd.
Dallas, TX 75230

COST:
This event is free and open to the public.

CONTACT:
For more information, the public can call (214) 739-7115 or e-mail Katharine at kteicher@jccdallas.org.

PHOTO OP:
– Seniors learning about the wide range of services available to older adults
– Individuals of all ages protecting their health with flu and pneumonia shots
– Fitness class demonstrations including Chair Yoga and Broadway-Style Line Dancing

ABOUT THE J
The Aaron Family Jewish Community Center of Dallas (The J) is part of an extended family, a home away from home providing programs and services for all ages and stages of life. Within its walls or around the world, The J’s members gather together to meet, play, learn, celebrate, and be part of the community. Everyone, regardless of age, race, religious affiliation, or any other protected status, is welcome. The Aaron Family Jewish Community Center is located at 7900 Northaven Road in Dallas. For more information, please visit www.jccdallas.org or call (214) 739-2737.

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