Archive | March, 2017

Quick study in Jewish mother-daughter dynamic

Posted on 23 March 2017 by admin

I don’t think I’m a typical Jewish mother.
I don’t cook very much — actually, next to nothing. As I’ve been aging, I’ve been doing so in the same home where I’ve lived for the past 33 years. I’ve made no attempt to move closer to either of my two children. I’ve always been independent. But I didn’t realize until very recently how important independence is.
My daughter was just here for a long weekend. We’ve made short visits to each other over decades; when I go to her, I feel like I’m walking on eggshells. And this time, as always when we’re on each other’s turf, we fight.
So why does this happen? Is it a normal part of the Jewish mother/daughter relationship? Maybe because she hasn’t been a typical Jewish mother, either. She has two sons, but became a widowed single parent before the older of them had even graduated from high school.
I know she has recurring thoughts that she didn’t do everything she should have for those children, because I have the same guilt about what I did, and didn’t do, for her and her older brother. Maybe Jewish mothering is always fraught with regrets. Maybe her eggshells feel to her here as fragile as mine do there. …
So we had a three-day visit during our beautiful early spring. I planned many things for us to do together: Walking the downtown arts district to see the varied architecture. Having lunches of our choice from the food trucks at Klyde Warren Park. Shopping at Central Market (a special treat for someone who lives in central Illinois, the home of Aldi’s!), and exploring NorthPark Mall (a special treat for someone to whom Kohl’s is big-time!). The Chili Cook-off. Tea at the Arboretum, with plenty of time to enjoy the beauty of Dallas Blooms. And even though I’ve never been a cook, and she’s used to that, I managed to turn out one passable supper, featuring delicious hamantaschen (baked by my Sisterhood sisters, not me!), for a post-Purim dessert treat.
I used to bake hamantaschen, package them up and send them to my children. But I hated every minute of the process; baking has never appealed to me any more than cooking.
I was only nine when I made my first pie “from scratch”; after I saw it disappear 10 minutes into dessert, I knew it was also my last — I wanted to put my energy into things that would live longer than that. I have the kind of visual memory that lets me put myself back into key situations of my past and see them again exactly as they were, so I can recall watching my mother take a pan of cookies out of the oven and saying to myself, “When I grow up, I don’t want to stay home and bake cookies. I want to go out and do things!”
And I can recall, just as clearly, that my daughter was about that same age when she said to me — as I rushed to leave home after a thrown-together supper so that I could cover a story — “When I grow up, I don’t want to go out to meetings. I want to stay home and bake cookies!”
Maybe that’s why we fight — because being such opposites actually makes us very much alike. Even as a working mother, she has always found time to bake those cookies. And even when I was a stay-at-home mom, I found opportunities to go after outside stories. Maybe those inside-outs keep us from understanding each other when they should really make it easier to do so.
I guess a Jewish mother never stops being a Jewish daughter, and a Jewish daughter grows into being a Jewish mother, and both fight for their elusive freedom from each other when it’s not what either really wants. I’ll try to keep all that in mind for our next get-together.

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Read it and eat: Gefilte Manifesto

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

We all know some books of the “read it and weep” variety. But here’s one that challenges you to “read it and eat.”
The catch is, you’ll have to cook what you’ll eat yourself — unless you’re lucky enough to be somewhere in New York within easy getting distance of The Gefilteria.
If you’re of Ashkenazi descent but have given up on your bubbe’s cuisine, The Gefilte Manifesto is the cookbook for you. For authors Jeffrey Yoskowitz and Liz Alpern, it’s an outgrowth of their joint venture into venerable Jewish culinary adventures at their business, The Gefilteria. Located in Brooklyn, this is where they plan, prep and sell the results of New Recipes for Old World Jewish Foods, which is the subtitle of their tome. They worked in this kitchen together for five years before committing their “secrets” to print.
A chance meeting led to these two dedicated cooks, both from traditionally Ashkenazi homes, discovering how much they shared a liking for all those good old foods of their childhoods. But in this world of today, Jewish Millennials would like those foods only if they were ramped up to their healthier expectations. So Yoskowitz and Alpern set about making the changes demanded by potential customers — and by themselves. The result? Eastern European “cuisine” morphed into a new specialty that started with gefilte fish.
Their Gefilteria website explains: “We took the classic dish and re-imagined it, making it colorful, gluten-free and responsibly sourced, with non-GMO olive oil and the highest quality fish. And we also made sure it tasted really great!” Young Jews tried it, and liked it. Dinners hosted by members of this adventurous generation started to pop up. Seeing a good thing, the Gefilteria principals expanded their offerings; the book includes recipes for soups, breads, main dishes and side dishes, and even suggests creative ways to use up your leftovers.
And pickles are almost as important as the gefilte fish! Yoskowitz apprenticed in pickle-making on an Urban Adamah, one of a fellowship of Jewish farms that “cultivate the soil and the soul to produce food.” There he learned the kind of fermentation that pickles and preserves without vinegar — the authentic way of his forefathers.
“Not only does that pickle have a lot of flavor,” he says, “but it’s good for your digestion. It’s probiotic. Eating a pastrami sandwich with a full sour pickle next to it — it’s the best way of helping digest that fatty pastrami!” Yoskowitz likens the good effects his pickles have on the stomach to those provided by yogurt!
The most expert Jewish cooks and food authors are kvelling about The Gefilte Manifesto. Leading the pack is Mollie Katzen, who helped usher in the age of vegetarianism with her famed Moosewood Cookbook. She gives lavish praise, saying it “…beautifully manages to frame traditional Ashkenazi cuisine with perfect twists and newness. It’s no small feat to retain the character of an old, emotionally held culinary culture while imparting fresh life to the standards. Jeffrey and Liz nailed it, not only with outstanding recipes, but also with history and stories and context, impeccably written.”
And Leah Koenig, author of Modern Jewish Cooking, says that this even more modern book “…digs deep into our Ashkenazi ancestors’ recipe boxes, pulls out time-tested favorites and lost gems, and finds ways to make them taste at once fresh and innovative, and utterly authentic.”
To learn more about The Gefilte Manifesto, just type those words into your browser. You can definitely find the book itself on Amazon — or maybe even at Target!

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SWJC talks F-35s, BDS at annual meeting

SWJC talks F-35s, BDS at annual meeting

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

Pulman speaks about perils of BDS with jet presentation in tow

By Aaron

Submitted photo Charles Pulman discusses the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement at the recent Southwest Jewish Congress annual meeting.

Submitted photo
Charles Pulman discusses the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement at the recent Southwest Jewish Congress annual meeting.

Greenberg
Special to the TJP

ADDISON — Charles Pulman took the role of bearer of bad news in stride at the Southwest Jewish Congress’ 2017 Annual Meeting on March 6 at Venue Forty50.
That’s because Pulman and his audience were already excited for the uplifting presentation to follow, by Lockheed Martin’s Eric V. Fox regarding the F-35 fighter plane.
But Pulman’s message — about Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions — was an essential half of the duo’s picture of what he called “the threat to and strength of Israel.”
“(BDS) seeks the destruction of Israel as the nation-state of the Jewish people,” the attorney and activist told attendees.
Pulman recently took four legislators from Texas and one from South Carolina to Israel to educate them on the reality of the situation and the potential impact of BDS. Israelis don’t see it as a major immediate threat, but rather as a huge long-term danger, Pulman said.
“They are worried about the effect of BDS on Millennials, when they are leaders of corporations and state government; that’s what Israel is concerned about,” Pulman said.
Pulman is one of many pro-Israel advocates actively pushing for anti-BDS legislation, such as the pending Texas House Bill 89 and Senate Bill 29.
While the BDS movement claims it is trying to right a wrong through economic pressure, Pulman warned that it does not seek peace and does not aim to help Palestinians. Instead, he said, it is bent on delegitimizing Israel through demonization. This can be seen in U.N. resolutions, such as those targeting Israeli businesses. There’s no corresponding action being taken against nations with worse human rights records.
He showed a video by influential British Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks. Sacks pointed out that there have been successive efforts to destroy Israel militarily, then economically, then politically, then psychologically. The latest version is the BDS movement, attacking it under a moral guise.
In singling out Israel and ignoring actions by other nations or the Palestinians, Sacks says, BDS is undermining its own moral argument.
“The BDS campaign will delay, defer, and endanger the Palestinian state,” Sacks said. “Rights are universal or they are nothing.”
Pulman took the legislators on a visit to a candy factory in the West Bank where 500 Palestinians worry they could lose their jobs if BDS is effective.
“They don’t want their company to turn into another SodaStream,” he said, citing a company that moved a factory from the West Bank to the Beersheba area after being targeted.
“Who got hurt? SodaStream?” he asked. “No. The Palestinians.”
Pulman stressed that while the anti-BDS legislation won’t end the problem, it is of vital importance because it will shine a light on the true aims of the BDS movement to destroy the Jewish state.
“Because the BDS campaign is a discriminatory campaign targeting Israel,” he told the TJP, “it is an anathema to the morals of the state of Texas. The state has no obligation to spend taxpayer dollars to support discrimination.”
To date, 16 states have passed anti-BDS legislation, and New York’s governor used an executive order.

One of two F-35 fighter jets in Israeli service Submitted photo

One of two F-35 fighter jets in Israeli service
Submitted photo

“When all the states pass this legislation, it’ll be a resounding message,” Pulman said. “BDS is not seeking peace. If individuals are seeking peace, what I pray for, and 95 percent of Israelis hope for, there are other ways to make your voices heard.”
The F-35 Lightning II has been in the news quite a bit recently over the cost of the program and estimates for the latest round of orders. But Fox’ lively presentation about what the fighter plane can do for the U.S. and allies like Israel won over the room.
First off, Fox noted that the costs continue to come down due to economy of scale, so that shouldn’t be a surprise. Secondly, many countries — particularly Great Britain — have paid substantial amounts into the development of the fifth-generation jets. The U.S. sells planes like the F-35 to close allies, including Israel.
The British contribution is $2 billion, part of $5 billion from American allies “that you, the American taxpayer, don’t have to pay,” Fox said.
But what really left an impression was his discussion of the plane’s capabilities. Fox compared it to the upgrade from a rotary phone to a smartphone. The stealth planes can detect enemy aircraft far quicker than they themselves can be detected, and include cutting-edge helmets designed by Israel’s Elbit Systems.
“The F-35 is a leap in technology — not just a generational leap, but a monumental leap forward in capability,” Fox told the TJP.
The wider role for the fighter planes also brings down the cost by requiring fewer other planes and allowing that manpower to be used in other ways.
Israel has 33 planes currently contracted, and a few have arrived already. It’s been named Adir — “Mighty One.” With more than 100 F-16s that will eventually need to be replaced, Fox sees the likelihood of more orders. He and Pulman saw the first planes arrive in Israel, and both talked about how impressive it was, and Israelis’ gratitude.
The night also marked a transition with Susie Salfield Avnery taking the role of president and Jonathan Spigel stepping down as chair after serving since 2009. The other officers are Harry Ploss, founding chair; Nelda Golden, vice president programming; Cindy Ray and Keo Strull, vice presidents fundraising; Rose Stromberg, vice president community relations; Marla Greenberg Janco, secretary; and Alan Tolmas, treasurer.
Dr. Catalina Garcia, Brenda Jackson, and Michelle Shriro joined the board of directors, with Bruce Bernstien and Mel Meyers as outgoing officers, and Lauren Cohen and Jenny Walters as outgoing board members.
“As the president of SWJC, I want to see the organization continue to build bridges in the community by providing quality educational programming,” Avnery said. “I appreciate that we are an organization of varied voices, liberals and conservatives, Jews and non-Jews.”
Spigel helped guide SWJC to self-sufficiency during his tenure, overseeing its development of educational programming and legislative efforts, including a successful bill signed by Gov. Rick Perry to create American Indian Heritage Day.
Pulman and Fox will give their presentations again March 23 at Congregation Ahavath Sholom in Fort Worth. SWJC has a number of other upcoming programs, including Israel and the Middle East Briefings with Gil Elan via Skype at the Aaron Family JCC in Dallas April 5 and May 3 and Ahavath Sholom April 6 and May 11, all from 7 to 8:30 p.m. The Latin American Jewish Experience will be offered April 9 at UTD’s Davidson Auditorium at 2 p.m., featuring Eli Davidsohn and Debra Polsky.

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Renewed need for community safety

Renewed need for community safety

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

Submitted photo Dallas organizational leaders attend a briefing on the new community-wide security initiative.

Submitted photo
Dallas organizational leaders attend a briefing on the new community-wide security initiative.

Federation looks ahead to protect Dallas Jewish organizations

By Sean Shapiro
Special to the TJP

The Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas rolled out a new community-wide security initiative last week, with the goal of helping protect and better secure all of the Jewish organizations in the area.
“This is something that we wanted to undertake, and it’s something that we felt we could help do for everyone else,” Bradley Laye, CEO and president of the organization, said. “This is something we felt could be put in place to help keep our entire community safer.”
The announcement comes at a time when security has become more paramount for Jewish organizations. Across the country there have been more than 150 bomb threats against Jewish institutions and communities in the past eight weeks, while other acts of vandalism and anti-Semitic incidents have been on the rise.
“Unfortunately it hasn’t been the easiest time to be a Jew in the United States,” Laye said. “Through this (initiative) we want to help combat that and protect our community.”
While it may look reactionary because of the timing, the Federation has been working on this for more than a year.
“It’s unfortunate that the latest events nationally have been thrust on the forefront of our news, and have been what people outside of our community been reading most about our community,” JFGD Board Chair Dan Prescott said.
“However I will say that what I can say personally, is the that entire the Dallas Jewish Community led by the Federation will continue to be strong and will be safe and will continue to be successful.”
In February 2016 the Federation requested a $30,000 grant to research and create the community infrastructure required for a more secure Jewish community. They homed in on three main goals including:

  1. Develop a community-wide communication strategy.
  2. Develop continuous community-wide training.
  3. Perform physical site assessments to harden one’s physical infrastructure.

Representatives from local law enforcement, the FBI, and the Secure Community Network (SCN) consulted on this project and on Feb. 7, officially launched a Community Security Initiative that will be led by a director of community security.
The director of community security will be hired with a law enforcement and security background, and the hire is expected to be made within three weeks, Laye said.
That person will guide an initiative that will assess security needs; implement Mir3, a mass communication service; develop training programs; act as a liaison to local law enforcement; and work to create a commissary of security needs to increase quality and potentially reduce cost.
There is no cost to community organizations to be involved and more than 50 local Jewish organizations attended the rollout meeting last Thursday.
Laye said the meeting has had great results. Most of the questions came about specific concerns for specific organizations or institutions, which showed the community is already thinking big-picture with the application.
“It shows that this really was needed and people realize it can help them,” Laye said. “We’re happy to have something in place like this and hopefully we can help everyone feel a little bit safer.”

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Crowning Kosher Chili Cook-off champ

Crowning Kosher Chili Cook-off champ

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

44 teams vying to become 24th winner during March 19 event

By Sean Shapiro
Special to the TJP

The world’s best kosher chili is going to be crowned this Sunday, March 19 on the campus of Congregation Tiferet Israel.
It’s a bold claim, but now in its 24th year, the Dallas Kosher Chili Cook-off has developed a history and consistently delivers the tastiest and best kosher chili to more than 4,000 in attendance.
The cook-off started in 1994 with 10 teams and has grown into a must-attend event for the local Jewish community. There are now more than 30 sponsors for the event, including the title sponsors for this year, Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC (locally known as Prescott Pailet Benefits) and Key-Whitman Eye Center.
Dan Prescott, along with Mark Kleinman and Jack Baum, established the Kosher Chili Cook-Off in 1994.

More than 4,000 people are expected to attend this year’s Kosher Chili Cook-off, which was founded in 1994.

More than 4,000 people are expected to attend this year’s Kosher Chili Cook-off, which was founded in 1994.

Last year’s first-place winners

Last year’s first-place winners

“We were looking for a simple family event that would bring the entire Jewish community together. It is amazing how it has grown into an event that has become recognized on a national and international level,” Prescott said. “And now, along with my partners — my brother, Stuart Prescott and Kevin Pailet, and longtime friend Dr. Jeff Whitman — we are proud to serve as the title sponsors at this 24th anniversary of the cook-off.”
Forty-four teams have entered the competition this year, and more than 4,000 people are expected to attend the event Sunday. Gates will open at 10:30 a.m. and winners will be announced around 3 p.m. with prizes for the top-three beef entries and top-two veggie entries handed out by a panel of seven judges.
“It really is a difficult competition to judge,” Ed Jerome said. “Between all the teams and all the chili, it’s hard to pick out a winner. But the winner really is the best kosher chili in the world.”
There is also a people’s choice award, which is voted upon the attendants who will have a chance to taste all the different recipes.
Tickets are $12 for adults, while tickets are $6 for children aged 4 through 10. Parking and shuttles will be set up at the Dallas Jewish Community Center to help ease the traffic flow.
The sponsors help cover the majority of the costs, which helps organizers raise money for local nonprofit charities. This year the cook-off proceeds will be shared with the Assist the Officer Foundation and Jewish Community Center Camp Scholarships fund.
Assist the Officer provides financial assistance for police officers who have lost work or are out of work due to serious injury or another catastrophic event. JCC Camp Scholarships help children who otherwise wouldn’t be able to attend camp take part in the summer camps.
“Regardless of how hot anyone’s chili recipe may be, it warms my heart even more to see our community coming together in unity and friendship sharing a common goal like the Kosher Chili Cook-off and helping local charities,” Rabbi Shawn Zell of Tiferet Israel said in a press release.
Royal Lane Baptist Church will also be on-site working with Tiferet Israel on a food drive for the North Texas Food Bank at Jewish Family Services.
While the chili and charity is the main attraction, each year organizers add new elements to the event.
On Sunday, Dallas Fire and Rescue will be on-site with their Fire Safety House, a mobile house that teaches and promotes fire safety for kids. The Home Depot is setting up a station for children to work on supervised wood craft projects.
Representatives from Be The Match will be on-site. Be The Match is an organization that works to cure blood-related cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, and operates the largest bone marrow transplant registry in the world.
The Mazik Brothers band, which volunteers for the event, plays and covers hits from the 1960s through the 1980s, and singing along is always encouraged.

 

*****

 

Judges

Chef Stephen Erwin is culinary service director for the Reserve North Dallas (previously, Town Village North) and has extensive experience as chef in many Dallas area restaurants and clubs.
David Feder has been a chef in Dallas and Austin, a food writer, and teacher of Food Science and Nutrition at UT Austin. He is currently a full-time journalist, author of The Skinny Carbs Diet Book and executive editor–technical for Prepared Foods/NutraSolutions magazine.
Dotty Griffith, known as “the culinary ambassador of Texas” and an authority on Texas cuisine, is an award-winning journalist, best-selling cookbook author, television-radio personality, and adjunct professor of culinary journalism at The University of North Texas. The former Dallas Morning News critic is the face and voice of True Texas Cuisine (www.truetexascuisine.com).
Chef Danny Hall is executive chef at John Q. Hammons Hotels & Resorts and has extensive experience as chef in many Dallas area restaurants and clubs.
Chef Michael Mrugala runs the entire kitchen operation for the Olive Garden on Northwest Highway and has extensive experience as chef in many Dallas area restaurants and clubs.
Chef Pete Nolasco is the owner, chef and sculptor of Chef Pete Catering, and was awarded “best caterer in Addison” in 2013. Pete has worked for many years in the Dallas area’s best restaurants and hotels.
Michael Scott is the executive chef and sales manager at Rosewood Texas Wagu Beef in Dallas and, previously, was the executive chef at Northwood Club in Dallas. He has extensive experience as chef in many Dallas area restaurants and clubs and is currently vice president of the World Master Chefs Society.

Competing teams

Adat Chaverim Brotherhood, Akiba Academy, Anti-Defamation League, Bnai Zion, Camp Sabra, Chabad of Plano/Collin County, CHAI/Yachad, Congregation Anshai Torah, Congregation Beth Torah, Congregation Ohev Shalom, Congregation Ohr HaTorah, Congregation Shaare Tefilla, Crystal Creek at Preston Hollow, Dallas Chevra Kadisha, Dallas Holocaust Museum, Dallas Jewish Conservatives, Dallas Jewish Historical Society, Dallas Kosher/Vaad Hakashrus, DATA, Far North Dallas/Richardson Democrats, Hadassah, Hebrew Order of David International, Henry Litoff, Jewish Community Center, Jewish Family Service, Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, Kehillat Chaverim, Legacy Senior Communities – Willow Bend, Loncar & Associates, Moishe House, Sephardic Torah Center of Dallas, Shearith Israel Brotherhood, Sparkman Hillcrest, Tamarack Camps, Temple Emanu-El, Temple Shalom, Texans for Education Opportunity, Tiferet Israel, Tom Thumb, Torah Day School, Whole Foods Market, and Yavneh Academy.

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Dallas Doings: Shrek, breakfast lecture and JWV lecture

Dallas Doings: Shrek, breakfast lecture and JWV lecture

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Shrek the Musical Jr. will run at the J from March 23 to April 2

Photo: Ashley Bundis Shrek The Musical Jr. will be performed at the Dallas Jewish Community Center March 23 through April 2.

Photo: Ashley Bundis
Shrek The Musical Jr. will be performed at the Dallas Jewish Community Center March 23 through April 2.

The fairy tale misfit adventure, Shrek The Musical Jr., comes to life on the Dallas stage with The J’s Performing Arts Space (JPAS) productions of the of the adaptation of the Oscar-winning DreamWorks Animation film.
Shrek The Musical Jr. is comprised of two casts with actors ages 6-18. The Green Cast performs at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 23; and 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday, March 26. The Blue Cast performs at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 30; 8 p.m. Saturday, April 1; and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 2. All performances will take place in The J’s Zale Auditorium at 7900 Northaven Road in Dallas. Attendees are encouraged to get involved in the show by dressing as their favorite fairytale character and purchasing a prop bag for audience interaction. Tickets are $18 for adults and $12 for children and seniors in advance. Tickets can be purchased online at http://bit.ly/2nk8y8U.
“Shrek The Musical Jr. is a fantastic show because it gives all the actors a chance to let their imaginations run wild about some of their favorite storybook characters,” said Alise Robinson, manager of JPAS. “We wanted to create a fun show that engages the audience and the actors while creating something that adults and children can enjoy together.”
JPAS is unique in that it focuses on education, performing and learning 21st-century life skills. It’s not just about the performance. The actors don’t just run through lines, learn their marks and follow the director’s lead. JPAS actors learn about intentions, how to be part of an ensemble, collaboration, movement techniques and coordination, listening and social skills, and the power of their voices. Additionally, JPAS hires the best directors, musical directors and choreographers in North Texas who have a background in making young actors more well-rounded and confident in themselves, and who will increase their talents to new heights. When JPAS actors finish the production, the goal is for them to have a new-found set of skills that they can use not only on the stage but in life.
Additionally, as part of its mission to expose children to more live theater, The J has donated 100 tickets (50 per cast) to North Texas nonprofit organizations to distribute to families they serve.
Blue Cast: The senior cast is comprised of 36 actors including: Claire Allen, Claire Blacker, Sophie Brock, Brody Bundis, Sopia Chavez, Haley Coleman, Ella DeWitt, Ella Edmundson, Lindsey Fetter, Aubrey Fomin, Nadia Fox, John Foster Glover, Izzie Haymann, Maggie Hurley, Marlee Ingram, Carli Jones, Bradley Jones, Jacob Kaplan, Megan Lederman, Adam Leybovich-Glikin, Michelle Leybovich-Glikin, Lyla Lively, Sadie Manaster, Amelia McAnear, Elliot McEachern, Sarah McIntosh, Sarah Moskowitz, Avery Murphy, Alexandra Rosenblatt, Max Rudelman, Mara Sandberg, Sarah Schussler, Sailor Schwaber, Montana Wulff, Dakota Wulff and Rachel Yahalom.
Green Cast: The Green Cast is comprised of 35 actors including: Parker Adams, Jada Anderson, Ryland Bundis, Mercer Bundis, Nola Carroll, Kevin Carter, Thandi Chisango, Jordan Clark, Kenzie Clark, Natalie Connelly, Ivy Daniel, Alyssa Dolman, Erin Edwards, Noah Fledman, Cooper Frank, Piper Glowacki, Paige Glowacki, Olivia Goin, Tatiana Gonzalez, Macy Gutow, Lainey Gutow, Maddie Isaac, Audrey Lewis, Sara Lipszyc, Gigi Melucci, Alexis Muturi, Amanda Park, Charlotte Rosuck, Sam Rubin, Jacob Sanders, Audrey Schedler, Jordan Velevis, Sydney Walters, Hayden Watros and Juliet Zucker.
— Submitted by Jef Tingley

Brian Cuban to speak at Beth Torah Men’s Club Breakfast

Brian Cuban, lawyer, TV host and author of Shattered Image: My Triumph Over Body Dysmorphic Disorder, will be the guest speaker at Congregation Beth Torah Men’s Club lox-and-bagel breakfast on Sunday, March 19.

Brian Cuban

Brian Cuban

Cuban, whose brother is Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, will speak about his recovery from depression, addiction and a distorted sense of self-image. The public is invited.
Breakfast begins at 9:30 a.m. at Congregation Beth To

rah, 720 W. Lookout Drive in Richardson. The cost is $10, $5 for students. For more information, call the synagogue at 972-234-1542.

Noted expert on far-right extremism to address JWV

Dr. John Macready, noted scholar and expert on radical right-wing extremism, will discuss anti-Semitism, hate crimes and racism at the JWV Harvey Bloom Post 256 monthly lox-and-bagel breakfast. The meeting is at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, March 26 at the Aaron Family JCC, 7900 Northaven Road in Dallas, and is open to all interested parties. A nominal $5 per person charge covers the cost of bagels, lox and fixings.

Macready

Macready

“The recent spate of bomb threats against Jewish community centers, schools and organizations around the country, as well as in our own back yard, is a matter of great concern,” stated Andrew Lavigne. “It is vitally important that we understand what motivates these acts of terrorism and how best to deal with them.”
Dr. John Douglas Macready is an adjunct assistant professor of Philosophy at the University of Dallas and El Centro College. His work focuses on critical issues in social and political philosophy with specific attention paid to human dignity as it relates to larger human rights issues such as statelessness, racism, genocide, and mass incarceration.
He is currently involved in an interdisciplinary study of the process of deradicalization in former far-right extremists as it pertains to anti-Semitism and other antisocial beliefs and behaviors. Dr. Macready’s work has appeared in the Journal of Social Philosophy and he is the author of a forthcoming book titled Hannah Arendt and the Fragility of Human Dignity (Lexington Books, 2017).
— Submitted by Andrew Lavigne

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‘Hidden’ Jewish hero of American history

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

In my opinion, one of the great weaknesses of American history textbooks, at least the ones traditionally issued in Texas public schools, has been the omission of those “common” people who took an unpopular position to do the “right” thing.
One such person was Dr. Herman Bendell of Albany, New York, who served as a field surgeon on various battlefields throughout the Civil War, and was even present at Lee’s surrender to General Grant at Appomattox.
After providing four years of outstanding combat medical services as a field surgeon, Dr. Bedell, at the war’s end, left active duty with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.
Five years later, Dr. Bendell was called back into government service by his old commander, Ulysses S. Grant, who was now the president of the United States.
Bendell became the only Jew ever appointed into what had been an all-Christian Bureau of Indian Commissioners. His job was to manage supplies for the native population in Arizona Territory, as well as to establish and maintain positive relations with the tribal leaders.
After almost two years of his conscientious effort, helping to establish a good working relationship with the tribes, his fellow commissioners recognized and praised his accomplishments.
They felt he was deficient in one category: religion. They felt that Indians becoming Christian was an important step in their “civilizing process.”
They petitioned the president: “Dr. Herman Bendell, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Arizona, is a most excellent official, a man of splendid judgment, strict integrity, who has managed the affairs of the office to entire satisfaction, but unfortunately he is not a Christian.”
Bendell was asked to step down, but in consolation for his efforts, President Grant appointed him for a short-term as consul to Denmark.
Following his stint in Denmark, Bendell returned to the States.
And so, “The Jewish Chief of the Indians of Arizona, 1871-1873” married, had four children, and finally settled down to a normal life as a physician in Albany, New York, one of the unsung (Jewish) heroes in American history.

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Around The Town: Emergency preparedness, Sweet Beginnings, Rockin’ Ruach

Around The Town: Emergency preparedness, Sweet Beginnings, Rockin’ Ruach

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Firsthand accounts of emergency preparedness and caring for war casualties

Two physicians who have served on the front lines of war caring for northern border Israeli civilians and war casualties from neighboring countries — most recently Syrian refugees — will speak at UNT Health Science Center on Monday, April 3.

Dr. Tal Marshak

Dr. Tal Marshak

Dr. Yoav Hoffman

Dr. Yoav Hoffman

Dr. Yoav Hoffman and Dr. Tal Marshak of Galilee Medical Center will discuss their work and share personal experiences with emergency preparedness during times of war, co-hosted by the UNTHSC School of Public Health and TCOM.
This visit is part of Partnership2Gether, a joint program of the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County and the Jewish Agency, to promote mutually beneficial endeavors and connections between the local community and the Western Galilee region.
Dr. Hoffman is assistant director of the hospital’s Pediatric Intensive Care Department (PICU). Since 2013, the PICU has taken care of pediatric casualties from Syria as well as serving the local population.
With responsibility for mass casualty events preparedness, Dr. Hoffman leads the hospital during emergency situations such as war, fires and chemical disasters.
Dr. Marshak is senior surgeon and head of the Rhinology and Skull Base Surgery Unit.
Since 1956, Galilee Medical Center has served as the largest government hospital in its region and currently treats a local population of 600,000.
After the medical center was bombed during the 2006 Lebanon War, an entire underground hospital was created, to provide uninterrupted service during times of crisis.
The April 3 conversation with these physicians is open to UNTHSC students, faculty, staff and the community and is the kickoff event for Public Health Week 2017. The event will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. in MET 125. Advance registration is not required.
Hoffman and Marshak will be Shabbat service guest speakers at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 31, at Beth-El Congregation and will also conduct a lecture from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 2, at Beth-El Congregation in the chapel. They will present on their work at the Galilee Medical Center, and share their personal experiences with emergency preparedness in times of war and treating Syrian refugees.
For more information, contact Dr. Marcy L. Paul, UNTHSC School of Public Health, at marcy.paul@unthsc.edu or 817-735-0537 or Bob Goldberg, 817-569-0892.
— Submitted by UNT Health Science Center and Bob Goldberg

Beth-El Congregation hosts Sweet Beginnings interactive dessert event

Have a sweet tooth? Even if you don’t you’re likely to develop one at “Sweet Beginnings” — Beth-El Congregation’s unique interactive dessert experience that will feature sweet tastings and chef demonstrations, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 25.
In celebrating Beth-El’s new “sweet beginnings” with Rabbi Brian and Mimi Zimmerman, honorary chairs of the fundraiser, Event Co-chairs Stacie Goldman, Neta Mandel and Alice Pritchard have created what is to be an exceptional evening where participants will get to decorate, sample, explore, taste, and devour a myriad of desserts in three specialty shops: The Ice Cream Parlor, The Bakery and The Chocolate Shop.
With over 40 community partners donating their time, talent and everything else from DQ Blizzards to bakery favorites, there will be something for everyone from sugar-free to gluten-free — a sure recipe for a fun celebration.
Chef demonstrations will feature best-selling cookbook author Holly Clegg, Culinary School of Fort Worth Founder Judie Byrd, chef extraordinaire Louise Lamensdorf and Central Market’s Master Pastry Chef Sarah Hooton.
Other “feastivities” will include the blending of sweet “spirits” with mixologists from Pacific Table, a unique whiskey tasting experience, live entertainment and raffle items.
And, a Beth-El Sweet Beginnings cookbook with recipes collected from congregants, family and friends will be available.
Different giving levels can be found on Beth-El’s website, www.bethelfw.org; individual tickets are $36.
For additional information and/or questions, please contact Neta Mandel at netacm@yahoo.com or 817-917-3320.
— Submitted by Jane Cohen

Rockin’ Ruach Shabbat

Cantor Shoshana Abrams Kaikov and her all-star musicians will fill Shabbat with Big Band sounds at Rockin’ Ruach Shabbat at 6 p.m. Friday, March 24, at Congregation Ahavath Sholom. An “All-American” Oneg will follow.
Hadassah takes turn in Austin
Join Hadassah for 2017 Date with the State. From April 2 to 3, Hadassah members will visit representatives and senators at the Capitol in Austin for an exhilarating and educational advocacy experience.
Beginning at 5 p.m. Sunday, April 2, through Monday afternoon, the program will provide an opportunity for you — as Jews, as women, as Zionists — to advocate on issues important to American Jewish women, including anti-BDS legislation, U.S.-Israel relations, preventative health care, stem cell research and treatment, and more.
The fee to attend is $36 per person. A limited amount of hotel rooms are available.
For more information or to receive a registration form, please contact Debby Rice at rice.debby@gmail.com or call the Greater Southwest Region office at 713-661-1022.

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No doubt that Dallas Jews support Israel

No doubt that Dallas Jews support Israel

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

GM030517-0109

AIPAC Dallas Annual Event Co-chairs Eric and Melanie Pinker, AIPAC Dallas Executive Council Chair Kenny Goldberg, Keynote Speaker Professor Alan Dershowitz and Co-chairs Susie and Joel Carp

AIPAC Dallas Annual Event Co-chairs Eric and Melanie Pinker, AIPAC Dallas Executive Council Chair Kenny Goldberg, Keynote Speaker Professor Alan Dershowitz and Co-chairs Susie and Joel Carp

AIPAC National President Lillian Pinkus moderates. (From left) Rep. Pete Sessions, Rep. Louie Gomer, Rep. Bill Flores, Rep. Marc Veasey and Rep. John Ratcliffe

AIPAC National President Lillian Pinkus moderates. (From left) Rep. Pete Sessions, Rep. Louie Gomer, Rep. Bill Flores, Rep. Marc Veasey and Rep. John Ratcliffe

Susie Carp interviews Alan Dershowitz.

Susie Carp interviews Alan Dershowitz.

More than 1,500 attend AIPAC Dallas event

Staff report

More than 1,500 ardent supporters of Israel gathered at the Omni Hotel on March 5 for AIPAC’s Dallas Annual Event (DAE). AIPAC Dallas Executive Council Chair Kenny Goldberg kicked off the evening, followed by welcoming remarks from Eric Pinker, event co-chair.
AIPAC National President Lillian Pinkus moderated the bipartisan congressional round table featuring Rep. Pete Sessions (R), U.S. Representative Louie Gomer (R), U.S. Rep. Bill Flores (R), U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey (D) and Rep. John Ratcliffe (R). Temple Emanu-El Rabbi David Stern followed, discussing his participation in an American Israel Education Foundation (AIEF) rabbinical mission.
One of the most memorable parts of the evening was a talk by TCU student activist Yannick Tona, a survivor of the genocide in Rwanda. He made poignant remarks about how members of his nuclear family had perished and his escape. He shared that his story is Israel’s story, making him a passionate advocate for the Jewish state.
Following that, Elias Saratovsky, AIPAC Southwest regional director, shared AIPAC’s mission through personal vignettes. The denouement of the evening was DAE Co-chair Susie Carp’s discussion with Harvard Professor Alan Dershowitz. A passionate Israel advocate, Dershowitz explained in depth the case for Israel from all political vantage points and the insidiousness of BDS.
In addition to Eric Pinker and Susie Carp, co-chairs for the well-received evening were their spouses Melanie Pinker and Joel Carp.

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Many options for Haggadot

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

Dear Families,
It is time to plan for Passover (yes, I know Purim is barely over)!
The rush to the stores for favorite items will begin — we start gathering Diet Coke (a real essential in my family) the minute it hits the stores. The cleaning probably won’t start for a while although so much is last-minute.
What about planning the Seder? Are you going to just bring out the same Haggadah as last year — have you been looking for the Maxwell House Haggadah at the store — or are you going to try something new?
There are so many options for Haggadot that it is a challenge to find the best one for your family. One year for our second Seder, I brought out a rather offbeat Haggadah thinking my teenagers would love it. After about 10 minutes, they insisted I put it away (or throw it away) and go back to a more traditional choice.
This Haggadah is great for young families! For those of you willing to try my family method, here is the idea: We have a simple (and inexpensive) Haggadah that everyone has. Then everyone has another Haggadah (or two) and we offer different texts and commentary throughout the Seder. And we also have a few Chumashim for us to look at the story of the Exodus.
It is a little complicated and sometimes gets lengthy but we have great discussions, lots of questions raised and lots of thinking and experiencing.
Try it!
Now this doesn’t work as well when you have lots of young children unless, of course, you plan lots of games and activities for them. Also important is to involve them in the questions and answers. The Four Questions are not the only ones for children to ask. Encourage them to come up with good ones.
Preparing for your Seder with young children requires lots of planning, but don’t forget to plan for the adults — you want it to be meaningful for the children but also for the adults. Plague bags with toys for each of the plagues are fun — but how do we teach our children that the plagues were bad? And then we must balance that with not scaring children — it is a challenge.
Begin now to plan your Seder so that the learning experience and meaningful memories happen for all ages. Then don’t forget that Passover is not over with the Seder.
Keeping Passover in the traditional way is not something every family has done but it is a wonderful learning experience for young children (even when challenging for parents). Start small — just eliminate bread and eat matzo! But even if you have always kept Passover traditionally, take the time for the discussion — now that you can have almost everything (from rolls to cereal to tacos), the question becomes “Can you keep the law but lose the spirit of the law?”
Shalom…from the Shabbat Lady.
Laura Seymour is director of Camping Services at the Aaron Family Jewish Community Center of Dallas.

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