Archive | July, 2017

All Jewish kids deserve camp experience

Posted on 20 July 2017 by admin

Bradley Laye, the Dallas Federation’s CEO, recently wrote to our community praising the beneficial effects of Jewish summer camp on children’s future lives. I’m seconding his motion, because my love for Judaism, and all my involvements in it, are rooted in that experience.
My camp began at the turn of the 20th century as a needed getaway for overworked immigrant women and their small children living in a teeming, smoke-filled city. A wealthy family first endowed a settlement house to help with Americanization, naming it after a daughter, Irene Kaufmann. The camp came next, named for Emma. Because the site was a quiet place in the farming area 30 miles outside Pittsburgh, Emma Kaufmann Camp quickly became known as Emmafarm!
My childhood home was Jewish in name only. Mother, a social type, served as president of her Sisterhood but attended synagogue only on the High Holidays. Father didn’t even do that; remembering his unhappy childhood in cheder (and when I read Philip Roth’s amazing story, The Conversion of the Jews, I know what he went through), he would never again walk into a institution headed by a rabbi! But as a doctor who was a declared, although never devout, Jew, he volunteered annually to do all required pre-camp physicals for kids going to Emmafarm at no charge.
The summer I would turn 9, he asked if I’d like to go to camp, too. I said yes. And the time I spent there 74 years ago shaped my Jewish future!
It wasn’t the physical place that did it; Emmafarm was practical and undistinguished. Far away from any lake front, it had only a pool. The flat main campus, like a rectangular college quad, had four large buildings running down each of its two longer sides — on one, the boys’ units; opposite on the other, the girls’. All were named for birds: Girls began as wrens and eventually grew up into woodpeckers; boys progressed as they aged from robins to eagles.
But at the head of the quad was the dining hall, and that’s where Jewish magic took place every Friday evening. We would file quietly into that huge, echoing room, which was full of chaos three times a day every other day as kids reached and grabbed across tables for whatever bowls and platters they wanted, hardly deterred by their exhausted counselors. Yet with Shabbat approaching, without anyone having to say a word, the mood shifted into something totally different. Something quietly wonderful…
First of all, the tables were clothed in white. And so were we. Everyone, all white, from head to toe. And as we entered, we sang that old, old hymn: “Come, O Sabbath day and bring … Peace and healing on thy wing … Thou shalt rest. Thou shalt rest …”
I recently read a piece, written by a minister, suggesting that Christians should look again into their hymnals and bring back the singing of some very old songs. I think we Jews should do the same. I don’t know how many of my fellow campers (and many of us, including me, continued on as Emmafarm counselors) still remember that song. But I sing it to myself, in my head, every Friday evening as I walk into synagogue. That one hymn alone was enough to make me Jewish for a lifetime!
I don’t know, either, how many others those Shabbat evenings similarly affected, but I do know that Emmafarm “graduated” an astounding number of adult Jewish professionals — teachers, social workers, camp directors and — yes — rabbis! Among them: the distinguished Earl Grollman, who served a Massachusetts congregation for 36 years while establishing an international reputation for his counseling and writings on bereavement. (And, btw: He met his wife at Emmafarm!)
So: Thank you, Bradley, for reminding our entire community that every Jewish child deserves a Jewish summer camp experience. Truly, its positive effects will last forever!

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Maccabiah Games results

Posted on 20 July 2017 by admin

Staff report

The 2017 Maccabiah Games ran July 4-16. Here is a list of results and updates since last week’s issue:

Open (College-young adult)

  • Chayse Bauer (soccer), of Frisco, and the women’s team fell to Israel, 2-1, in the final, but won every other game.
  • Hayley Isenberg (basketball), of Dallas, scored 2 points in a 72-36 win over Australia, 2 points in a 77-63 semifinal win over Russia and helped defeat Israel, 71-61, to win gold.
  • Samuel Rabb (rugby), of Dallas, is a member of the rugby delegation. The Sevens squad claimed fifth place with a 35-0 win over France, while the Fifteens team won gold with wins over Australia, Israel, Argentina and South Africa, with the latter coming in the finals.
  • Sarah Weisberg (gymnastics), of Plano, is the daughter of Jonathan and Grace Weisberg. The gymnasts  competed in beam, floor, uneven bars, vaults and all-around events.

Juniors (Youth)

  • Omer Dannenberg-Lerner (gymnastics), of Plano, won gold in beam with 12.100 score  — .400 above silver. She tied for bronze in floor exercise with Lihi Raz of Israel at 11.650. She and Haymann (see below) earned silver in the team competition.
  • Kaya Haymann (gymnastics), of Dallas, also competed in the beam, floor, vaults and uneven bars. She and Dannenberg-Lerner (see above) earned silver in the team competition.
  • Ashley Isenberg (basketball), of Dallas, scored 2 points in 63-31 pool-play win over Canada, list to Israel, 97-41. The team defeated Australia, 66-49, but came up short against Israel in the final, 83-43.
  • Griffin Levine (basketball), of Dallas, scored 8 points in pool-play, 94-55 win over Canada and added another 15 in 121-26 win over Mexico. He also scored four points in a 118-35 win over Australia. Levine scored 12 points and the team defeated Israel, 92-80, to win gold.
  • Hannah Mandel (soccer), of Frisco, helped defeat Australia, 11-0, in pool play. The team defeated Canada, 4-0, in the semifinal and beat Israel, 2-0, to win gold.

Masters (Adults)

  • Linda Leftin (tennis), of Dallas, began competition after deadline July 12, but no individual results have been posted.
  • Michael Rubenstein (basketball), of Houston, is the son-in-law of Janine and Charles Pulman of Dallas. He scored 2 points in 73-57 win over Australia and 7 points in 68-67 loss to Russia. He reached double digits with 11 points in a 98-56 win over Chile. He scored 3 points in a 94-81 loss to Israel, but scored 8 points to claim bronze with a 79-68 win over Argentina.

    In addition, Brianne Lawton, of Denton, is an athletic trainer for Team USA.

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Ditzenberger excited to play for Kansas baseball team

Ditzenberger excited to play for Kansas baseball team

Posted on 20 July 2017 by admin

Staff report

Every year, thousands of high school seniors visit college campuses in hopes of finding the perfect fit.
Dylan Ditzenberger found his with his glove, arm and swing.
The Allen third baseman committed to play baseball for the Kansas Jayhawks last fall, and as the school year approaches, he is becoming more and more excited.
“I’m looking forward to living on my own,” Ditzenberger said.IMG_2010WEB
Ditzenberger played his high school ball at Allen, where he maintained a .436 batting average and a .500 on-base percentage. Although he will play infield in college, he really shone as a pitcher in his senior year. He kept a minuscule 0.247 earned-run average, which included a no-hitter in his final district start to clinch the district championship. The District 6-6A MVP helped the Eagles make the playoffs for the first time since Ditzenberger had played for the team.
“We made it all the way to the third round,” he said. “That was great.”
Because of his success, Ditzenberger was selected to play in the Metroplex and Texas High School Baseball Coaches Association all-star games.
Paul Coe, Allen’s baseball coach, told the Dallas Morning News how important Ditzenberger was to his club.
“He’s such a great third baseman it’s hard for us to pull him off there and let him start. He’s a competitor.”
Ditzenberger picked Kansas for its academics, competition in the Big 12 and its legendary basketball program. The infielder played varsity basketball at Allen and competed in the 2015 JCC Maccabi Games in Dallas, and said it had “a really awesome impact” on his recruiting. He chose Kansas over New Mexico, Arkansas, up-and-coming baseball program Dallas Baptist and Texas-Rio Grande Valley in Brownsville.
Before Ditzenberger heads to the Sunflower State, he’ll play in the American Amateur Baseball Congress (AABC) Connie Mack World Series July 28-Aug. 6. His summer team qualified for the tournament by winning a tournament earlier this summer.
Ditzenberger understands that playing time is limited, but expects to compete for an infield position next spring.

“Talking to the coaches, I have just as much chance as anyone else,” he said.

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Around the Town: WWI exhibit

Around the Town: WWI exhibit

Posted on 20 July 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Have a Fort Worth story tip? The Texas Jewish Post is always looking for good leads on stories.
Email sharon@tjpnews.com.

Fort Worth Central Library hosts WWI centennial exhibit

Susie Hyman, Kim Factor, and Hollace Weiner were part of the North Texas WWI Centennial Commemoration Committee, which on July 9 kicked off an exhibit at the Fort Worth Central Library.
Susie, wearing a cloche hat from the period, is program director of Imagination Fort Worth, which will be bringing student groups to the library exhibit, which runs through Oct. 19.
Imagination Fort Worth has created a curriculum to go with the exhibit, which is titled “From Cowboy to Doughboy: North Texas in WWI.”

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray sharon@tjpnews.com Have a Fort Worth story tip? The Texas Jewish Post is always looking for good leads on stories.  Email sharon@tjpnews.com. Fort Worth Central Library hosts WWI centennial exhibit Susie Hyman, Kim Factor, and Hollace Weiner were part of the North Texas WWI Centennial Commemoration Committee, which on July 9 kicked off an exhibit at the Fort Worth Central Library.  Susie, wearing a cloche hat from the period, is program director of Imagination Fort Worth, which will be bringing student groups to the library exhibit, which runs through Oct. 19. Imagination Fort Worth has created a curriculum to go with the exhibit, which is titled “From Cowboy to Doughboy: North Texas in WWI.”  At the opening reception, Kim sounded the bugle with a call to the colors.  She wore a World War I campaign hat and her father’s World War II uniform. Kim, an attorney, is the official bugler for Jewish War Veterans Martin Hochster Post 755.   Hollace, who directs the Fort Worth Jewish Archives, created four colorful panels about local Jewish participation in the Great War. She also filled an exhibit case with artifacts that include a soldier’s World War I siddur, a tallit, and a photo of a 1919 Passover seder for American soldiers in Luxembourg. The World War I exhibit includes a film and lecture series. Hollace will speak at 1 p.m. Sept. 17 about “Monuments & Memory.”  — Submitted by  Hollace Weiner

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com
Have a Fort Worth story tip? The Texas Jewish Post is always looking for good leads on stories.
Email sharon@tjpnews.com.
Fort Worth Central Library hosts WWI centennial exhibit
Susie Hyman, Kim Factor, and Hollace Weiner were part of the North Texas WWI Centennial Commemoration Committee, which on July 9 kicked off an exhibit at the Fort Worth Central Library.
Susie, wearing a cloche hat from the period, is program director of Imagination Fort Worth, which will be bringing student groups to the library exhibit, which runs through Oct. 19.
Imagination Fort Worth has created a curriculum to go with the exhibit, which is titled “From Cowboy to Doughboy: North Texas in WWI.”
At the opening reception, Kim sounded the bugle with a call to the colors.
She wore a World War I campaign hat and her father’s World War II uniform. Kim, an attorney, is the official bugler for Jewish War Veterans Martin Hochster Post 755.
Hollace, who directs the Fort Worth Jewish Archives, created four colorful panels about local Jewish participation in the Great War. She also filled an exhibit case with artifacts that include a soldier’s World War I siddur, a tallit, and a photo of a 1919 Passover seder for American soldiers in Luxembourg. The World War I exhibit includes a film and lecture series.
Hollace will speak at 1 p.m. Sept. 17 about “Monuments & Memory.”
— Submitted by
Hollace Weiner

At the opening reception, Kim sounded the bugle with a call to the colors.
She wore a World War I campaign hat and her father’s World War II uniform. Kim, an attorney, is the official bugler for Jewish War Veterans Martin Hochster Post 755.
Hollace, who directs the Fort Worth Jewish Archives, created four colorful panels about local Jewish participation in the Great War. She also filled an exhibit case with artifacts that include a soldier’s World War I siddur, a tallit, and a photo of a 1919 Passover seder for American soldiers in Luxembourg. The World War I exhibit includes a film and lecture series.
Hollace will speak at 1 p.m. Sept. 17 about “Monuments & Memory.”
— Submitted by Hollace Weiner

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Do your part to improve world

Posted on 20 July 2017 by admin

Dear Families,
All of us who work with families hope that children will realize that each of us has the power to make the world a better place. Tikkun olam is one area of action where you don’t have to be perfect.
Sometimes just doing anything is a step in the right direction. The responsible actions to take are those that will help others when they are in need. When we don’t act when others need help, we close our eyes to the world. We must not say that someone else will do what is needed — we must do our part to make the world a better place.
Text of the Week: Hillel was accustomed to say: If I am not for myself, who will be for me? And if I am for myself alone, what am I? And if not now, when? — Pirke Avot 1:14

  • Why does Hillel focus first on taking care of yourself? Why is that the responsible thing to do? What happens if you do not take care of yourself?
  • Hillel goes to the next step and wonders what kind of a person we are if we only care about ourselves. What kind of person cares only for themselves?
  • The last phrase of this mishnah tells us to act now and not wait. Why is that important?
  • An important way to fix the world is by being responsible — in Hebrew the word is achrayut. Being responsible means that others can depend on you. It means you are willing to be accountable for what you do or not do — you accept credit when you do things right and you accept corrections when things go wrong. When you take responsibility, others can count on you. Making excuses is not something a responsible person does — you want to be trustworthy.

There are simple and easy ways to demonstrate that you are a responsible person. However, simple and easy is not always simple and easy. To be considered a responsible person is a quality that is earned by actions such as these:

  • When someone asks you to do something, do it to the best of your ability.
  • Focus on your own part, not someone else’s.
  • Be willing to accept credit or correction when you do something.
  • Admit mistakes without making excuses.

Shalom…from the Shabbat Lady.
Laura Seymour is director of camping services at the Aaron Family Jewish Community Center.

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Military’s expanded recognized religions list worthwhile challenge

Posted on 20 July 2017 by admin

I vaguely recall in filling out my Army enlistment papers in the 1950s, being asked to either check one of the six or so religions shown, check no preference, or to write one in on the blank line provided.
Fast-forward to the present, when I recently received a government news release announcing the Department of Defense increasing its list of recognized faiths and belief systems from a little over 100 to an expanded list of 221.
Some of the faiths I had never heard of included; Eckankar, Heathen, Church of the Spiral Tree, Troth, Wicca, Pagan, Deism and Asatru.
What a shocker! Obviously I have not been following developments in this area. It seems that there have been growing numbers of military enlistees whose faiths and belief systems were not among the mainstream and not officially recognized.
So, how does this recognition of religious belief systems outside the traditional mainstream faiths help the military and its members?
The Chaplains Corps believes that by being all-inclusive, service members of the non-mainstream faiths will now feel more accepted and will be more willing to approach Chaplains of any faith with the expectation that they will be heard and helped.
For incoming Jewish military, they can still choose “Jewish” or one of the three (Orthodox, Conservative or Reform), bringing the number of Jewish choices to four.
Before one criticizes our military leaders for possibly making things more complicated and confusing than they need to be, consider the following.
There is a rational justification for developing a more accurate, complete list of faith groups to which a military member may belong.
This change means that servicemen and -women who are members of small faith groups will now have the same rights and protections granted to service members of the larger, traditional faith groups.
Before the faith group list was expanded, there were some military who were refused time off for religious observances because their faith was not listed. Some service-members were even punished and given extra duty for requesting time off.
Our military now recognizes the 200-plus listed faiths, allowing all service-members to attend and/or observe legitimate holidays, if possible. Of course, the needs of the military always come first, no matter what the religion or holiday.
On one hand, this expanded list of recognized faiths by the U.S. Military sounds fair, democratic and inclusive, but at the same time it must present a challenge to the Chaplain Corps who are generally not members of those sects.
Let us wish them well. Hopefully this expansion of faith acceptance will serve to further strengthen the unity of the men and women of our military.
Bless them all, whatever their faith.

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Rabbis with Texas ties on ‘blacklist’

Rabbis with Texas ties on ‘blacklist’

Posted on 17 July 2017 by admin

Israel’s Chief Rabbinate doesn’t trust list to vouch for engaged couples’ Jewishness

By Rick Press
Special to TJP

In 2017, the notion of a “blacklist” — particularly one involving rabbis — seems almost unthinkable.
And that may explain the howls of complaint surrounding last week’s revelation that Israel’s Chief Rabbinate had compiled a list of 160 rabbis — 66 from the United States and at least one from Texas — who, essentially, would not be trusted to vouch for the Jewishness of immigrants wishing to get married in Israel.

Ken Roseman

Ken Roseman

Itim, the immigrant advocacy group that filed a freedom of information request to acquire the names, dubbed it a “blacklist,” and the group’s leader, Rabbi Seth Farber, said it reflects the ultra-Orthodox Rabbinate’s distrust of Jewish communities beyond Israel’s borders.
“It’s telling 160 Jewish communities around the world ….your rabbi is not a rabbi,” Farber told the Associated Press. “The baseline assumption is that no one can be trusted.”
Kobi Alter, a spokesman for the Chief Rabbinate, was in full damage-control mode Wednesday, insisting that the list was not an attempt to delegitimize the rabbis but rather was a reflection of requests that were rejected in 2016 because of  missing documents or technicalities.
“Every case has a different explanation,” he told NPR.
Reactions from rabbis who made the list were mixed: some were perplexed, some defiant, others outraged.
Rabbi Kenneth D. Roseman, rabbi emeritus at Beth Israel Congregation in Corpus Christi, said he was unsure why he made the list but he viewed his inclusion with “a wry smile” and “contempt for the corruption in the Haredi,” the ultra-Orthodox sector of Israeli society that controls the rabbinate.
“The publication of this list will only alienate even more diaspora Jews who want to support Israel,” said Roseman, who served as senior rabbi at Temple Shalom in Dallas for 17 years before moving to Corpus Christi. “Too often, they go through traditional motions, but ignore the essential ethical values of Judaism.”
Roseman was in prominent company. Rabbi Adam Scheier of Montreal, who is close with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, was on the list. So was Daniel Krauss of Kehilath Yeshurun Synagogue in New York, where U.S. President Donald Trump’s daughter, Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, were congregants. (Another former Texas rabbi, Alberto Zeilicovich, was also on the list. The Argentine-born leader of Congregation Beth Shalom in Fair Lawn, New Jersey, was formerly rabbi at Congregation Ahavath Sholom in Fort Worth.) Also, on the list was Houston’s beloved Rabbi Joseph Radinsky of United Orthodox Synagogue.
“I have received a number of congratulatory letters from colleagues, many asking how they could have the ‘honor’ of being on the list,” said Roseman in an email. “When I announced my listing to the congregation (Friday) night, there was applause and approbation.”
A group of 13 California rabbis even sent a letter to the Rabbinate asking that their names be added to the list, as a show of solidarity.

Rabbi Alberto Zeilicovich of Congregation Ahavath Shalom in Fort Worth photographed July 1, 2008. (Photo/ Richard W. Rodriguez)

Rabbi Alberto Zeilicovich of Congregation Ahavath Shalom in Fort Worth photographed July 1, 2008. (Photo/ Richard W. Rodriguez)

Rabbi Brian Zimmerman of Beth El Congregation in Fort Worth was not on the “blacklist,” but he believes the fallout surrounding it should be a cautionary tale.
“We’ve always known that our decisions would be challenged by a very small group in Israel. But ultimately this is about power. It’s not about religion,” said Zimmerman. “This is why you should separate synagogue and state.”
The Chief Rabbinate has sole jurisdiction over many aspects of Jewish life in Israel, including marriage, divorce and burials. And the ultra-Orthodox group has rejected thousands of requests from international rabbis in recent years.
Israeli Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi David Lau said in a letter of apology that “the list’s intention was not to invalidate rabbis, God forbid, but rather to invalidate letters that raised doubts and questions.”
But Roseman and many others weren’t buying that explanation.
He said, if asked, he wouldn’t hesitate to write another letter on behalf of a congregant.
“I’ll tell the truth,” he said, “and if some Haredi in Israel doesn’t like the way I dot my “I” or cross my “t,” that’s too bad.
“The Chief Rabbinate may want to hold the line in opposition to the modern world,” he added, “but that strikes me as effective as if a peewee football team were to play the Dallas Cowboys. They will eventually disappear from power; their days are numbered. as they should be.”

Zeilicovich had an opinion on the matter as well.
“It’s clearly a dividing policy, and it’s very, very sad that the State of Israel is telling a huge part of the Jewish people you are not recognized here,” said Zeilicovich. “I have more religious rights in a non-Jewish country, like the United States, than in my own Jewish country.”
Zeilicovich returned from Israel on Monday and he said tensions were running high iafter the blacklist was released. Conservative and Reform Jews were making their voices heard.
“There was a huge outrage. The fact that rabbis are being discriminated against by the Rabbinate, it is very concerning. And it’s not just the rabbis it’s the Conservative movement. They disenfranchise Jews,” he said. “And who are they, who gave them the power to do that? They’ve got political power. This is a political problem, not a religious problem.”

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Differences in big-T, little-T truths in Torah

Posted on 13 July 2017 by admin

Dear Rabbi Fried,
I’m curious if you can help clarify the concepts of personal (little “t”) truth and Torah (big “T”) Truth.
Within Judaism, we allow enough wiggle room to claim, for example, that both Ashkenazi and Sephardi traditions can be True. Similar examples touch all aspects of life and law, where multiple contradictory truths are considered True. Thus, the concept of Torah Truth seems to be more of a spectrum than a definitive (view-)point. It seems that as long as one’s approach to Torah study is genuine, then groups or even individuals can bring down different Truths.
How does this concept hold up outside of Judaism? If someone of another religion is also living a moral life, and is toiling genuinely in their religious texts, they will surely also report a genuine relationship with God, and access to Truth. From the Jewish perspective, can a non-Jew access (a piece of) the Truth?
All the best,
— Michael
Dear Michael,
It is true that there is a spectrum of observance within the scope of Judaism and Torah, such as Sephardic, Chasidic, German, Hungarian and Lithuanian customs. These are not different versions of Truth, as you suggest, rather different approaches of how to approach the same Truth.
Let us look at an example of this. Imagine three people standing next to a large lake, discussing its beauty. One says that the water is blue, reflecting the sky; another feels it looks green, like its lily pads, and the third sees it as gray, like the clouds. Which one is correct? The answer is, all of them! There’s probably a smattering of all three colors in that lake and each feels more connected, from his or her perspective, to one of those hues. As long as all three agree upon the key axiomatic makeup of the lake that it is H2O, then there is a “gray area” which is up for interpretation and individual connection and all those viewpoints are equally valid.
So too with Torah; we have certain axioms both in belief and in practice. All of the above-mentioned sects, Ashkenazic and Sephardic, etc., believe in the same Torah from Sinai, the same 13 Principles as outlined by Maimonides which form the framework for our belief system, our definition of Truth. Even with regard to observance, take for example the observance of Shabbos, they are all basically the same. They all accept the same 39 categories of creative activity from which to refrain on the Shabbos; they all recite the same Kiddush over a cup of wine, enjoy the same three Shabbos meals, etc.
Then there are certain gray areas, such as, does one spend more time on Torah study or song and dance? When studying, does one spend more time on the Talmud and Jewish law, or on the Kabbalah and more esoteric subjects? Even within the actual laws of Shabbos, there are subtle nuances, gray areas that may differ, at times, between these sects based upon custom. All are equally valid because they are based upon a true understanding of the sources with the integrity of keeping within the axiomatic truths accepted and agreed upon by all.
They all take into account the H2O of Torah and differ in the gray areas, the subtle hues and nuances. If you look carefully, this is true of all arguments and disagreements throughout the Talmud; it’s not about the general axiomatic principles but about the details, the nuances, the gray undefined areas that are subject to interpretation.
This is the true definition of one’s approach to Torah being “genuine,” not only in intention, but with inherent integrity: playing by the rules defined by the Torah itself.
With regard to other religions, you are correct that according to the Torah a sincere Gentile can also connect to God and develop a genuine, meaningful relationship to Him. We are not a religion that believes that either you’re Jewish or doomed!
There is, however, one caveat. This is as long as that Gentile has not only good intentions, but also fulfills his or her minimum requirement of the service of God according to the Torah with regard to Gentile observance. This means a scrupulous observance of the Seven Noahide Laws. If their religion jibes with these Noahide laws then it is considered, by the Torah, to be consistent with the Truth, and its adherents will merit a portion in the World to Come.
Rabbi Yerachmiel Fried, noted scholar and author of numerous works on Jewish law, philosophy and Talmud, is founder and dean of DATA, the Dallas Kollel.
Questions can be sent to him at yfried@sbcglobal.net.

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Around the Town: Fiddler on the Roof Jr., Daytimers

Around the Town: Fiddler on the Roof Jr., Daytimers

Posted on 13 July 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Fiddler on the Roof, Jr.

For one weekend only, Casa Mañana will be showing Fiddler on the Roof, Jr. Beth-El congregant Lauren Magee, daughter of Leslie and Alan Magee and granddaughter of Brigitte Altman, has been cast as Golde in this abbreviated children’s production directed by Noah Putterman.

Lauren Magee

Lauren Magee

Show times are 7 p.m. Friday, July 14; 1 and 5 p.m. Saturday, July 15; and 2 p.m. Sunday, July 16.
General admission tickets for these performances are $15 and can be purchased by contacting the Casa Mañana.

Daytimers head to Amon Carter July 26

Larry Steckler and the Daytimers crew have been busy preparing for the group’s Wednesday, July 26 trip to the Amon Carter Museum. The afternoon will begin with lunch at Beth-El.
You can bring your own, or order a Subway sandwich for $6.
Following lunch at approximately 12:45 p.m., folks will load up to carpool to the museum. Parking in the museum lot is free. In addition there are three handicapped spaces near the ramp on Camp Bowie, to the left of the entrance. Everyone should plan to arrive at the museum no later than 1:15 p.m. Maps of how to get to the museum will be available at Beth-El.
Depending on the size of the Daytimers group, the museum will provide one, or two docents if more than 20 are attending. In addition to the regular exhibits, Daytimers will get a look at the special Polaroid exhibit that has just opened.
Please let Larry know as early as possible if you will be attending, and if there is space in your vehicle for others. Photography without flash is permitted. There will be a few wheelchairs available and you may bring your own and walkers if they are needed.
The Subway lunch will include tea, coffee and cookies. Choices are the Italian BMT, Rotisserie Chicken, Tuna Salad or Meatball subs. You must call Larry Steckler, 817-927-2736, with your order and reservation.

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Va. mayor to talk career, Congressional shooting

Va. mayor to talk career, Congressional shooting

Posted on 13 July 2017 by admin

Allison Silberberg and her parents Barbara and Al, at the future mayor of Alexandria, Virgina’s graduation from American University. “I absolutely hear my parents belief in me,” said Mayor Silberberg. “They set the example for a life of doing good.”

Allison Silberberg and her parents Barbara and Al, at the future mayor of Alexandria, Virgina’s graduation from American University. “I absolutely hear my parents belief in me,” said Mayor Silberberg. “They set the example for a life of doing good.”

Dallas native Silberberg guiding DC-suburb Alexandria

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, recently made a comment that defines the translation of l’dor v’dor — from generation to generation.
“Only together can we preserve what our ancestors left to us,” she said. “We are all the temporary stewards of this national treasure called Alexandria.”
Silberberg will share her story at 3 p.m. Thursday, July 20, at The Legacy at Willow Bend.

“Life is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world,” said Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, who will speak at The Legacy at Willow Bend July 20.

“Life is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world,” said Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, who will speak at The Legacy at Willow Bend July 20.

Silberberg’s city quickly gained the national spotlight after June 14, when a gunman shot Republican lawmakers at Eugene Simpson Stadium Park. Capitol Police Special Agent David Bailey, Congressional Aide Zachary Barth, Capitol Police Special Crystal Griner, Tyson Foods lobbyist Matt Mika and Representative Steve Scalise, the House Majority Whip, all were injured during the attack. The gunman, James Hodgkinson, died in a shootout with police.
“This has been a shocking time but Alexandria responded with action,” Silberberg said. “We continue to pray for the wounded. To our first responders, who saved the lives of many, there aren’t enough thanks, and to our strong residents, who came out for days offering cool drinks, baked goods and their hearts. You can’t manufacture ‘community,’ and Alexandria has it overflowing.”
Silberberg, a Hillcrest High School graduate with a B.A. from American University and a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of California, Los Angeles, is the daughter of the late Al and Barbara and sister of Dana and Susan. She grew up at Temple Emanu-El and was a second-generation member of BBYO’s Jennie Zesmer chapter.

(left to right) Dana, Susan, and Allison Silberbergs’ futures were in bloom long before their futures were known. Today, Allison is the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia.

(left to right) Dana, Susan, and Allison Silberbergs’ futures were in bloom long before their futures were known. Today, Allison is the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia.

Silberberg says her love for service was taught by her parents, rabbis and a caring community that she calls very special and it’s her parents’ encouraging voices that she feels in her heart. Her mother’s volunteering at her schools, working on political campaigns, including those of Adlene Harrison and Ann Richards, and her appointment to the Texas State Library and Archives Commission set the bar. Barbara Silberberg also shared her example through active membership in both National Council of Jewish Women and the family’s synagogue. Temple Emanu-El’s Rabbi Kimberly Herzog Cohen says Silberberg lives the heart of her heritage.
“Mayor Silberberg exemplifies that value of service we seek to cultivate as Jews, here at Temple and beyond,” said Rabbi Herzog Cohen. “We’re inspired by and grateful for the ways she pursues tzedakah, charity that helps those in need, and tzedek, justice, at the heart of systemic change.”
Silberberg’s career began as a writer and photographer — which could easily be the focus of a chapter in her book, Visionaries in Our Midst: Ordinary People Who Are Changing Our World. The Society for Women’s Health Research commissioned Silberberg to co-author a book and she created a bound legacy in her commissioned memoir And Life Will Be a Beautiful Dream: A Book about Peggy and Alvin Brown. Her writing appeared on PBS.org in conjunction with Ken Burns’ and Lynn Novick’s The War and David Grubin’s The Jewish Americans. Her talents broad, she’s written for politicians and an episode of Mama’s Family.
Silberberg’s career includes an internship with Senator Edward Kennedy; her role as chief editor and chief research assistant for Senator Lloyd M. Bentsen; being the founding leader of Lights, Camera, Action! — a nonprofit to mentor youth as well as grant making to nonprofits; serving on the World Bank’s community outreach grants committee; and serving on the City of Alexandria’s Economic Opportunities Commission, also as its chair.
While leading a monthly community service group called the Film Biz Happy Hour, which she founded to make contacts, have fun and make a difference all at once, more than $50,000 was raised for nonprofits. When she asked to run for office, it was an idea whose time had come. After being Alexandria’s vice-mayor, she was elected to lead Nov. 3, 2015. This April, she was a panelist at the U.S. Conference of Mayors, regarding vacant and abandoned properties and issues of aging.
“It’s about rolling up your sleeves and getting work done, and it’s the work that matters,” said Silberberg. “It’s an honor to see what’s possible, and to be a part of making the possible happen.”
For Bob Weinfeld, who has interviewed more than 50 guests at The Legacy, hosting Silberberg is an honor.
“It’s absolutely a genuine honor to interview Madame Mayor,” said Weinfeld, who will spend the day of Silberberg’s visit celebrating his 91st birthday. “She’s lived a fascinating life and it seems to be more so every day. Our community should be, and we are, so proud of her.”
Weinfeld’s daughter Brenda Bliss, one of many hometown friends with whom she’s close, echoes her father’s esteem of Silberberg.
“Allison is loyal, honest, objective and a good listener. She’s open to ideas while strong in her convictions and committed to the causes that matter to her,” said Bliss, whose friendship with Silberberg spans teenage tennis court matches and BBYO experiences, as well as the years they both attended graduate school in Southern California.

(left to right) Sally Waxler Oscherwitz, Caryn Statman Kboudi and Allison Silberberg, now Mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, when the threesome were BBYO best friends.

(left to right) Sally Waxler Oscherwitz, Caryn Statman Kboudi and Allison Silberberg, now Mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, when the threesome were BBYO best friends.

“Allison has been interested in politics for as long as I’ve known her and she is successful because she wants to fix things and make them better. She’s always wanted to problem solve,” said Bliss. “She’s always been a great friend and I’m so proud of all that she has accomplished.”
For Silberberg, what she’s accomplished, and what she continues to pursue, all of which her friends, family and supporters are proud of, is giving her heart, talent, expertise and dedication each day, serving in a life that she says “is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world.”
For more information about the July 20 program at The Legacy at Willow Bend, or to RSVP, email robert.weinfeld@tx.rr.com.

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