Archive | October, 2017

Noah teaches us: Strive to be better

Posted on 19 October 2017 by admin

This week’s Torah portion, Noach, starts out with an interesting description of Noah: “Noah was a righteous man; he was blameless in his age.” Is this simply a beautiful example of biblical poetry, a couplet in which the same thought is expressed in two different ways?
Or is this description of Noah hinting at a qualification to his character? Is it a hint that Noah is only righteous when compared to the evil generation of humanity among whom he lives? But if we were to compare Noah to, say, Abraham, then we wouldn’t think Noah was all that special? Or perhaps the fact that Noah — imperfect as he was — remained righteous despite being surrounded by temptations, which made Noah even greater than Abraham? It is a wonderful debate well worth reading about further in the commentary.
Personally, I like to think of comparing Noah to the rest of his generation not as a slam against Noah’s character, but as an inspiration to us all. Noah didn’t have to compare himself to Abraham; he compared himself to those around him. Neither do we have to measure ourselves against some unattainable moral exemplar like Abraham. It would be demoralizing if we did because we could never be as great as Abraham. But, if we simply do what we can to make the world better, then we too can be righteous in our age.
It is as Rabbi Tarfon said in Pirkei Avot 2:16: “Lo alecha ham’lacha ligmor v’lo ata ben chorin l’bateil mimena. You are not responsible for finishing the work, but neither are you free to leave off from it.” That is, when we are faced with what seems to be an overwhelming task, all that’s expected is that we do what we can. And there is so much that needs work in this world today that it can feel overwhelming, as if the work will never be completed. But we’re not the ones who have to complete the work; we just have to do what we can.
There are thousands, millions, of people affected by hurricanes and floods and wildfires and earthquakes. There are so many people affected by so many natural disasters that I couldn’t possibly help them all. But I don’t have to because I just have to give of the resources that I can.
I don’t have to feed every hungry person in Texas, but I have to do my share in keeping the food pantries stocked. I don’t have to provide housing for every homeless person in Texas, but I do have to do my part in supporting homeless shelters. I don’t have to be a doctor myself, even if it would have made my mother proud, to heal the people who are ill, but I do have to support the clinics that provide healing to the needy.
We don’t have to be as great as Abraham. Rather, we should try to be like Noah, striving to be better than those around us. For if we all did, if we all tried to be better than each other, then we would create a virtuous circle. We would continuously improve the world around us, as we inspire each other to even greater heights. And when we all give what we can of ourselves and our resources, then when we put it all together, we will see the work completed.
Rabbi Ben Sternman is the spiritual leader of Congregation Adat Chaverim in Plano.

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Should we be interested in the spirit of our age?

Posted on 19 October 2017 by admin

Every new generation seems to offer up its own fresh take on life and living, sometimes building upon the sentiments and belief systems of previous generations and sometimes consciously moving away from them to forge new paths forward.
An undeniable spirit pulses through each society and time which often comes to define that particular era in the process. Exploring recent American history, we find the silent generation (1927-1945), on the one hand, with its spirit of conformity and adherence to the status quo, and the baby-boomer generation (1946-1964), on the other hand, which shook everything up with its spirit of free love and peace.
When it comes to trying to pin down the nature of any given time period, hindsight becomes an invaluable tool, for only after the fact can any era be examined in its totality and more accurately compared with other generations, both prior and future. Isolating the spirit of the current day and age, on the other hand, isn’t nearly as simple. It is in many ways comparable to the difference between a man trying to capture a good photograph of a tornado he can see coming from miles ahead and another trying to get a similar image whilst tossing and turning in the eye of the storm.
All that being said, and with a healthy dose of personal chutzpah, I’d like to share with you what I believe to be the beating pulse and central spirit of this newest and current period in American history. It can be briefly summed up as “Be yourself, and be proud of it!,” and is encapsulated in a quote I found online attributed to the singer Lady Gaga, “Don’t you ever let a soul in the world tell you that you can’t be exactly who you are.” In America 2017 we embrace differences in all areas of life and extol those who aren’t afraid to “be themselves” in the fullest sense of the word.
It seems that I’m not the only person who has noticed this newest of societal trends. In an op-ed to The New York Times (Unless You’re Oprah, ‘Be Yourself’ Is Terrible Advice: June 4, 2016), Adam Grant, organizational psychologist and professor of management and psychology, similarly noted, “We are in the Age of Authenticity, where ‘be yourself’ is the defining advice in life, love and career.”
The question we are left to ponder as individuals is whether or not this current sentiment is something we should be interested in embracing and espousing ourselves. On the one hand, most of us believe that we should encourage others to express their personalities and bring their unique interests and talents to the collective table. If that’s what “be yourself” stands for, I think most of us are all in. The problem lies, however, with a newfound take on our “be yourself” sensibilities that is becoming more and more evident with time and that must be earnestly reckoned with.
Greater numbers of people are opting out of the noble institutions of marriage and parenthood, claiming that it’s just not “them.” Others see “being themselves” as a license to act out many of their most primal, natural urges without a second thought. Why be monogamous, so the thinking goes, when it contradicts our very nature?  Why avoid cursing or gossip or unabated hedonism when it feels so very good inside?  To others, “being themselves” discharges them of personal accountability — “What can I do? After all, I am what I am.”
It is this darker side of the “Be Yourself” Generation that we must be wary of and remain in diligent opposition to. For it was none other than the great and saintly Vilna Gaon (1720-1796) who clarified in his ethical treatise, Even Shleima (1:2), that, “the main purpose of human existence is to strengthen ourselves constantly in the breaking of our traits.” And as if to add emphasis to that original, commanding statement, he continues, “And if (a person) is not involved (in the breaking of his traits), what is his life worth?”
Is this not one of the central lessons of brit milah, ritual circumcision that just because something is natural doesn’t mean that we must accept its existence in our lives?  The essential question we must ask ourselves, then, is not whether or not any given trait or drive is natural but whether or not following in that trait’s or drive’s path is spiritually ruinous or beneficial.
I would be remiss if I didn’t also make mention of the vital contribution on this subject made by Rabbi Avraham Yitzchak HaCohen Kook (1865-1935), first chief rabbi of the State of Israel, in his poetic writings on the subject of teshuva, repentance. In Orot HaTeshuva (15:10), Rav Kook writes as follows: “When we forget about the nature of our souls, when we divert our attention from our inner lives, everything becomes mixed up and confused. The essential teshuva, which immediately illuminates the darkness, is found when one returns to himself, to the root of one’s soul.”
Ironically, Rav Kook is teaching us that it is only through the act of rising above our natural inclinations and the breaking down of our naturally selfish and sometimes destructive traits in teshuva that we uncover our sparkling, true selves, “the root of one’s soul.” It is of this deeper, spiritual self that the Torah shares in the enduring words of Shakespeare’s Polonius when he opined, “to thine own self be true.”
To contact Rabbi Yogi Robkin, email him at yrobkin@dataofplano.org.

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Yavneh boys’ soccer falls short of state tournament

Posted on 19 October 2017 by admin

Staff report

The Yavneh boys’ soccer team won its first-ever playoff game last week, but fell short of advancing to the state tournament with a 2-1 loss to Longview-Saint Mary’s Catholic in Tyler on Monday.
Yavneh finished the regular season 11-1 and cruised to a dominating 5-1 victory against Longview Christian in bi-district play. However, the Bulldogs couldn’t find the back of the net often enough in the second round of the Texas Association of Private and Parochial Schools playoff.
St. Mary’s scored both of their goals in the first half, but Eli Minsky scored early in the second half to make the game tense.
Yavneh’s only regular-season loss came against Dallas International, which the Bulldogs defeated in the second round of district play. Dallas International defeated Nacogdoches Regents, 1-0, and will face St. Mary’s in the semifinals.

Max Weinstein, Sammy Nurko and Zach Bernstein earned first-team all-district honors, while Sammy Schultz, Eli Minsky and Ofek Reef were second-team selections. Jared Notelowitz and Elisha Klein earned honorable mention and Max Weinstein was the Newcomer of the year.
Most of the team returns for next season, with senior Sam Schultz the only graduate.

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Change written in sky one October day

Posted on 19 October 2017 by admin

Before October 2017 becomes history, I’m looking back at several of this month’s important dates.
Two are closely related, because both have to do with the discovery of America. Since 1937, the second Monday of October has been observed as Columbus Day by presidential proclamation. There’s no day dedicated to Amerigo Vespucci, who arrived in what we call South America just a few years after Columbus hit the Bahamas; still, we can never forget him, because both our continents, North and South, carry his name.
But here is, also, a little-known recognition: Leif Erikson Day honors the Viking who may actually have discovered America 400 years before Columbus. Also by presidential proclamation, it’s nominally observed every year on Oct. 9 — although government workers don’t get any time off. Since I once had a neighbor who insisted that it would be un-American to forget Erikson, I honor him also every year on Columbus Day — whatever date that second Monday in October may be.
However, all that is mere prelude to the third, most important date: Oct. 4, 1957. It’s not a holiday. Yes, it gets brief mentions from the various media, but you had to be there to know how it felt — suddenly recognizing the turmoil our country was being tossed into. I know, because I was there, and like all who were there, I can remember how I got the news. I can see myself again, exactly where I was and who I was with, when word came that the Soviet Union had launched the world’s first satellite: Sputnik — a compact Russian word for something elliptical, capable of orbiting the earth.
Some weeks before, I’d had the privilege of hearing Buckminster Fuller speak. What impressed me most from the long talk was his recollection of pushing his baby girl in her pram when a plane flew overhead in a clear London sky. That was many years earlier; it was the first plane he’d ever seen. And the great geodesic dome designer shared his first thought: “My daughter is going to grow up in a different world.”
I was together with friends that Sputnik evening. We were in a local coffee shop, reviewing the lecture we’d just heard at Chicago’s old Max Strauss Jewish Community Center, when the news came on the TV that, up to that point, we’d been ignoring. The only word for what happened to us: Galvanized. We couldn’t speak. We couldn’t take our eyes off that telecast. All of us knew immediately that our country would change profoundly. It would have to…
My husband had stayed home with our year-old son so that I could attend that evening’s lecture, which I no longer recall anything about. But I remember thinking of Bucky Fuller, and of my little boy, who was going to grow up in a very different world…
Suddenly, America was babbling about the importance of math, which had lagged woefully behind in public education for a long, long time. And science, which was even farther behind. Not too many years before, I had graduated from one of the highest-ranking public high schools in the country, and all that was required of me in a college-prep curriculum was one semester each of general science, algebra and plane geometry. All of us, crowded around that Formica table, were college graduates in “soft” subjects; nobody knew anything about what we quickly realized would be most important for our own children to learn.
Then America rose to President JFK’s challenge: to put a man on the moon by the end of the ’60s. So on July 20, 1969, my husband and I, with our son — two weeks before his bar mitzvah — and his 9-year-old sister were glued to our TV at home, watching “one giant leap for mankind…”
For me, October will always be for remembering America’s three discoverers, plus the shock that made us wake up and smell the challenging smoke of a Russian satellite.

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Education not only for kids

Posted on 19 October 2017 by admin

Dear Families,
Many years ago in Dallas, all the Jewish educators sat around a big table to discuss the needs for Jewish education in our community.
Bottom line, it was about where should the money go, but the big question is how do we impact the most people. Everyone except one group believed in more and different opportunities for children. Who was the group that disagreed and what did they want? It was the early childhood educators, who wanted the emphasis to be placed on adult Jewish education. Their rationale? If you educate the parents, the grandparents and the adults, the children will benefit.
Just this week in eJewishphilanthropy.com, Rabbi Dr. Shmuly Yanklowitz wrote an article titled: Adult Learning is the No. 1 Priority for the Jewish Future. Hooray! Here briefly are his three reasons and a few of his comments:
1. Adult learning is the pathway to children’s Jewish education: “One of the most frequently asked questions…is: Rabbi, how do I get my child (or grandchild) to love Judaism? My initial answer is always the same: You must love it!” Our children are watching us and even when we don’t think it is happening (like in those teenage years), they are modeling our behavior. But it must be real — don’t just learn Jewish “for the kids.” Do it for yourself because they (and you) will know the difference.
2. Judaism is about adults, not children. “A parent and child must both study Torah. When possibilities exist for only one, the adult’s personal needs take precedence to the child’s.” (Kiddushin 29b, Shulchan Aruch Y.D. 245:2) There it is — even in Talmudic times, the rabbis knew where the priorities were. Judaism requires adult thinking. Yanklowitz says: “Bringing God down to earth requires sophisticated thought and sophisticated minds. Bringing ethics into the workplace and Godliness into the home requires deep spiritual and emotional investment…Judaism will only thrive (and survive) if Jewish adults are learning Jewish wisdom and ensuring that wisdom continues to be applied in nuanced ways to each era.”
3. Adult education has the best potential for engagement: “When we talk about “adult Jewish education,” we must be clear that we’re not primarily talking about competency, fluency and literacy, but rather about relevancy,” says Yanklowitz. All learning for adults must be relevant and relate to their lives — adults vote with their feet. If the learning is meaningful, they will come!
We owe it to the future of Judaism, we owe it to our kids, and we owe it to ourselves — get involved in Jewish learning today. The Melton and Gesher programs at the J continue to show us that adults want to learn — and we know that the hardest part is getting them in the door! Once engaged in meaningful, high-quality Jewish education, adults keep coming back for more. It is as important as exercise — in fact, consider it exercise for your mind and your soul!

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Dallas Doings: Parenting, Consul General, new director

Dallas Doings: Parenting, Consul General, new director

Posted on 19 October 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Courses offered to teach how to embrace, improve distinctive parenting styles

Being a parent can be overwhelming, especially in today’s modern world with so many places providing “expert advice” at every turn. But becoming a parent isn’t about perfection; it’s about experiencing the  longest relationship of discovery in anyone’s life and one of the most demanding roles (with a HUGE learning curve). With this in mind, The J is excited to partner with renowned Jewish education organization Ayeka to offer a sampling of its “Becoming a Soulful Parent” workshops to the North Texas community. These unique, hands-on seminars led by education experts are helping change the conversation about parenting using the principles of Jewish wisdom to explore and discuss topics such as becoming a soulful and more self-confident parent and becoming a more appreciative partner.
“Our enterprising society, keenly aware of our parenting anxiety, floods us with books, articles and courses that claim to help us feel ‘in control’ over what is usually most decidedly out of control — raising kids,” says course creator Dasee Berkowitz. “‘Becoming a Soulful Parent’ is a program that is changing the conversation about parenting. There are no ‘quick fixes’ that will get childrearing ‘right.’ Being a parent to your child (or children) is not about solving problems. (At Ayeka, we believe) that our children are not projects to manage. Each one has a soul and a unique role to play in the world. And so do parents. It’s the parents’ job to nourish their children’s souls and in the process to grow their own soul, too.”
“Becoming a Soulful Parent” shifts the focus from a “success/ accomplishment/ achieving” mentality to an evolving parenting style filled with examples from external experts mixed with the experience of listening to one’s own intuitive wisdom. Every parent struggles. The challenge is to see one’s children, and by extension other people, as “souls” — not as personalities to like or dislike, egos to tread on or discipline; but as spirits that are unique, precious, and created with genuine divine light. When parents can slow down, accept the present, and honor their children and themselves by listening, every interaction can become an opportunity for growth, learning and creativity for the whole family.
During the “Becoming a Soulful Parent” workshops, attendees will have a chance to take a break from external pressures, including work, to surround themselves with like-minded people interested in coming together to discuss the essence of raising children with the infusion of wisdom from Jewish texts. The workshop will also teach attendees how to embrace their different parenting styles (including those of their partner or spouse) and to appreciate, with gratitude, the contributions their styles make to their child or children’s life.
The workshops samplers will be led by Dasee Berkowitz, The J’s early childhood expert, Tara Ohayon and Ayeka educator Chani Rodin, who have applied many of these principles to their own lives and families. The courses are offered free of charge during three, convenient one-hour times at 9:30 a.m., 11:45 a.m. or 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 25, at  the Aaron Family Jewish Community Center, 7900 Northaven Road in Dallas. The workshops are open to parents of children of any age (with or without their parenting partner). However, RSVP via the online form is required for each class to ensure adequate space. For more information, visit http://www.jccdallas.org/earlychildhoodcenter/becoming-a-soulful-parent-sampler/.
— Submitted by Jef Tingley

Consul General Gilad Katz at JCRC Town Hall

The Jewish Community Relations Council and AJC will welcome new Consul General of Israel Gilad Katz to the Southwest at a Town hall breakfast meeting at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 24, at the Aaron Family JCC. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. Consul Katz will share his first impression of Texas and give an update on the Houston Jewish community following Hurricane Harvey. The event is complimentary to attend, but registration is required at jcrcdallas@jewishdallas.org. A light kosher breakfast will be served.

Daron Babcock to speak about urban farms at Beth Torah

Daron Babcock, executive director of Bonton Farms, will be the guest speaker at the Congregation Beth Torah Men’s Club monthly lox-and-bagel breakfast on Sunday, Oct. 22.
Babcock heads one of the nation’s largest urban farms that turned a vacant lot in South Dallas into a project that grows food, provides jobs and restores hope in a disadvantaged part of the city. He will discuss how the farms are transforming a “food desert” into a source of healthy produce — and pride — for the community.

Submitted photo Daron Babcock (center) will speak at Beth Torah’s Men’s Club breakfast Sunday, Oct. 22.

Submitted photo
Daron Babcock (center) will speak at Beth Torah’s Men’s Club breakfast Sunday, Oct. 22.

The breakfast starts at 9 a.m. at the synagogue, located at 720 W. Lookout Drive in Richardson, near the crossroads of Bush Turnpike and Central Expressway. The cost is $10 — $5 for students — and the public is welcome. For more information, call the synagogue at 972-234-1542.
— Submitted by Michael Precker

Levine Academy names new ECC director

Stacey Behrendt has been named the new Levine Academy Weinreb ECC director. She will begin Nov. 13.

Stacey Behrendt

Stacey Behrendt

Behrendt has extensive early childhood leadership experience in Dallas and Boston. Stacey served as director of the Primrose Schools in Dallas and Frisco for the last five years. For five years prior to moving to Dallas, she was director of the Mosaic School in Boston.

Get Back to shul at Shearith Israel’s Beatles Shabbat

Cantor Itzhak Zhrebker and the Shearith Israel choirs will lead a Beatles-themed Kabbalat service at 6 p.m. Oct. 27 in the Beck Family Sanctuary at Shearith, 9401 Douglas Ave.
There is nothing like davening to Cantor Zhrebker’s clever scoring of the prayers to Beatles songs. After services there will be a Shabbat dinner for the entire family. Laura Miller will share speak on the topic “What I have Learned Battling Breast Cancer Twice.”
Reservations are required for dinner and cost is $13 for adults, $8 child and $40 maximum per family.

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Around the Town: A Lost Leonardo

Around the Town: A Lost Leonardo

Posted on 19 October 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Illana Stein comes home to direct A Lost Leonardo

We are happy to welcome Illana Stein, a Fort Worth native, back to Texas for another exciting theater directing opportunity. Illana is here to direct A Lost Leonardo by David Davalos at Amphibian Stage Productions, 120 South Main St. in Fort Worth, which began last Friday and runs through Nov. 5.
Izzy Fields, the production’s costume designer, also has a strong Fort Worth connection.

Photo: Illana Stein Director Illana Stein (left) and costume designer Izzy Fields discuss costume options for A Lost Leonardo. The play runs through Nov. 5 at Amphibian Stage in Fort Worth.

Photo: Illana Stein
Director Illana Stein (left) and costume designer Izzy Fields discuss costume options for A Lost Leonardo. The play runs through Nov. 5 at Amphibian Stage in Fort Worth.

This witty play centers on the genius, Leonardo Da Vinci, during a period of time when he was struggling to find his identity, torn between two passions of art and science. In this incisive comedy, award-winning playwright David Davalos (playwright of Wittenberg) asks what price we’re willing to pay for the pursuit of knowledge. We also meet other historical characters including Machiavelli, Cesare and Lucrezia Borgia and other figures of the Italian Renaissance.
The script was originally written under the title, Daedalus. Staged readings and workshops have been both performed in Fort Worth and New York City. In 2015, there was a reading of the script (under the title of Daedalus) at Amphibian Stage Productions that was well received and played to a sold-out audience. Matt Amendt, a well-known, New York City-based actor, who appeared in the Fort Worth reading, is again taking on the title role.
Director Illana Stein lives and works in New York City but has her roots and parents in Fort Worth. Illana received her Jewish education at Congregation Ahavath Sholom, where she had her bat mitzvah and attended confirmation classes. She was an active BBYO member throughout high school.
Illana also has ties to the Fort Worth Theater community. She started in theater at age 5, in classes at Casa Manana, and was a Kids Who Care, Inc. core company member. She then attended the University of Oklahoma, where she graduated with a BFA in Dramaturgy in 2006. Since college, she has worked in theaters across the country. Her assistant directing credits include work at Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Yale Repertory Theatre, Hanger Theatre, Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, and Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. She was associate director at the Theatre for a New Audience for (New York Times Critics’ Pick) Tamburlaine the Great, directed by Michael Boyd, and Pericles, directed by Trevor Nunn. Most recently, she was associate director on Fingersmith by Alexa Junge, directed by Bill Rauch, at American Repertory Theater. In New York City, she has also assisted at Signature Theatre Company, Pearl Theater, and is a directing company member in New York Madness Theater Company. She is also a member of the 2012 Lincoln Center Theater Directors Lab.
Illana and Izzy are thrilled to be working together again as director and costume designer, having collaborated on a New York production of a night-circus-themed A Midsummer Night’s Dream together in 2013. Izzy Fields is a New York-based costume designer with stage and film credits. She is an MFA graduate of the Tisch School of Design and is the resident costume designer for both Fault Line Theatre and National Yiddish Theatre-Folksbiene in New York City. She recently opened a new musical called Part of the Plan, music by Dan Fogelberg, in Nashville at Tennessee Performing Arts Center. Izzy is the cousin of Fort Worth’s Barry Schneider, also a congregant of Ahavath Sholom.
A Lost Leonardo runs at Amphibian Stage Productions, 120 S. Main St., through Nov. 5. General admission tickets are $33. Fore more information, visit amphibianstage.com or call the box office at 817-923-3012.
You may also walk away with a secret or two about the origins of the Mona Lisa.

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Passion for fashion benefits Midtown Park

Passion for fashion benefits Midtown Park

Posted on 19 October 2017 by admin

Horowitz raises more than $25K through fall fashion show

 Andrea Statman, Director of Development at The Legacy Senior Communities, thanked Sam Horowitz for his devotion and dedication and for following in his family’s footsteps to becoming his own incredible philanthropist.

Andrea Statman, Director of Development at The Legacy Senior Communities, thanked Sam Horowitz for his devotion and dedication and for following in his family’s footsteps to becoming his own incredible philanthropist.

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

“Ciao Bella” is how 17-year-old Sam Horowitz begins his farewells as he prepares to leave Dallas for college next fall.
His first goodbyes are attached to a donation of more than $25,000 to The Legacy Midtown Park raised through a spectacular fall fashion show he curated Sunday, Oct. 8, at the home of his grandparents, Carol and Steve Aaron.
“This is really a special day and it’s because so many people have supported me and my dreams that I’m able to be here and have this happen,” said Sam, standing amid the forest-like backyard of his grandparents’ home. “This, my third and final Fall Preview, comes because of the support of so many and I can’t thank everyone enough.”
With three shows now in the books, Sam has raised more than $62,000: in 2015, $12,000 for the Aaron Family JCC, and, in 2016 and 2017, more than $50,000 for The Legacy Senior Communities. This year’s donation will support the Financial Assistance Fund, helping those in need. Sam has also participated in the JCC’s J’s Got Talent and J Idol, raising money for the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas and Jewish Family Service.
For Sam, tzedakah and volunteerism is a hereditary trait. His grandparents, community pillars and philanthropists Carol and Steve Aaron, were honored that he chose a project so close to them.
“I couldn’t be prouder of Sam for stepping forward and wanting to donate to our Financial Assistance Fund. A community is judged by how they care for their seniors and that’s an expensive prospect. For the next generation to make that a priority — I’m so thrilled,” said Carol Aaron. She is the chair of The Legacy Midtown Park, scheduled to break ground next year, and former board chair of The Legacy Senior Communities. “We had family living at Golden Acres and we know that a community that helps its residents, and its residents’ families, provides a much more wonderful life. That our own next generation is making this project a priority, swells my heart.”
Sam’s biggest fan was brimming with a smile brighter than any jewels on the runway. “Sam is fortunate to have found his heartbeat in life early and he’s now using his eye for style to give back to his community. I’ll always be there for him,” said his mom, Angela Horowitz. “I’m so proud because he not only understands what it means to work hard for your success, but also he is living — even as a young man — what it means to share that success and to have the desire to help others.”
This summer, Angela got to see Sam’s eyes glisten brightly when he met Italian designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana. Working toward a career as a creative director for a fashion house or label, Sam loves textures, design and color. He appreciates the risks that Dolce and Gabbana take, and hopes someday to have a similar career path.
An A student at Parish Episcopal School, Sam is a former Akiba Academy student and member of Congregation Shearith Israel. The son of Angela Horowitz and Gary Horowitz and older brother of Sydney and Max, he sets the bar high for success, commitment and following one’s dreams.
Center stage is not an unusual place for Sam, who performed in the casts of more than a dozen productions at the JCC. He had several film and television roles including Barney & Friends Laugh with Me, Big D NYE, Dirty Red, The Deep End and The First Kill, as well as commercial and industrial projects. A participant in Columbia University’s Summer Programs for High School Students, he studied business, finance and economics. Through SPI: Study Abroad, he studied in Spain.
Sam entered his teens with lots of lights, cameras, and action as his bar mitzvah celebration was covered by local and national media with appearances on Ellen and Good Morning America. A YouTube video shot by Elixir Entertainment garnered more than 1,190,135 views.
Sam’s Facebook page and YouTube Fashion and Lifestyle channels are a couple of his many projects. On- and offline, he produces fashion shows, critiques red carpet looks, and styles friends and family members. Videos about trends and his top picks range from My Favorite Facial and Summer of Silk to Eight Looks for Hanukkah and Fashion Week Style Secrets.
“I read about and watch the trends and I get to mix my love of everything fashion with helping people make great style choices. For every person that usually means something different so the job is never the same and never going to feel like a job,” said Sam. “I’ve learned so much in just these three shows that I’ve done, from the negotiations and working with the modeling agency, to actual wardrobe decisions and how to build a collection to match the audience attending, but also about seating charts and event planning, from invitations to literally the napkin choice. But it’s so much fun and very rewarding.”
It’s no coincidence that Stanley Korshak owner Crawford Brock, Korshak’s Director of Fashion and Events and Director of Windows Bret McKinney and Sam’s Fall Preview Producer Caryn Fonberg all referred to Sam’s “passion for fashion” when asked what makes this teen a future fashion titan. “Sam is nothing short of amazing. I’ve never met anyone with more zip in his step,” said Brock, whose store’s fashions were shown on Sam’s Ciao Bella runway by Campbell Wagner Agency models. “He’s an absolute talent, a superb showman and he has the fortitude to create a future for himself and for our industry.”
For Sam, whose family is synonymous with the spirit of giving, The Legacy Midtown Park was a definite in his design for donations. “I’ve grown up volunteering at The Legacy, playing bingo, card games, visiting and listening to residents’ stories. It’s a place where there are smiles on all of the seniors’ faces,” he said. “I wanted to partner again for the future because growing older isn’t always easy, but at The Legacy, they do their best to make it magnificent.”
To follow Sam Horowitz, visit Facebook.com/MeetSamHorowitz, Instagram.com/Sam_Horowitz,Twitter.com/SamHorowitz1, or on YouTube at http://bit.ly/1aOWkmF.

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Columbus Day not what it used to be

Posted on 12 October 2017 by admin

In case you may have forgotten, the reason we didn’t get our mail this past Monday was that it was Columbus Day, a national holiday since 1937. It doesn’t seem to be as popular as it used to.
I remember being a young teenage-member of the New York Naval Cadets proudly marching in the Columbus Day Parade. We were taught back then that Columbus was a hero.
Hearing the crowd’s applause, I felt proud honoring the man who “discovered America, proved the Earth was round, not flat, and brought advanced European civilization to the primitive people of the new world.”
That is what our history book said, what I was taught in school in the 1940s, what I believed to be true, and what I still read in textbooks issued by the Dallas I.S.D when I began teaching in 1961.
By the 1970s, however, scholarly research was revealing Christopher Columbus as a mariner whose primary ambition was personal wealth and power, and the willingness to use unspeakable cruelties against the native peoples in order to achieve those goals.
While Columbus’ voyages did contribute toward a more accurate view of the then known world (larger than most thought), he was not the first to discover it. Leif Erickson beat him by 500 years, but Columbus did a better job of informing Europe of his findings.
Columbus did not prove the world was round. Enough voyages by various explorers and mariners occurring many years before 1492 had already shown that to be true. Only a few ignorant people may have believed the earth was flat when Columbus sailed.
Finally, the only advanced items of European civilization he brought were armor and weaponry with which he used to conquer, intimidate, punish, torture, decimate and enslave the native peoples.
Some recent articles present the possibility that Columbus may have been a Marrano (a Jew pretending to be Catholic), but his inhumane treatment of native peoples would indicate otherwise.
If my Italian-American friends need a national Italian hero, there are so many to choose from (Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Caesar, writers, artists, etc.) In fact, I just read in The New York Times that over 100 Italian-American authors marched as a group in Monday’s Columbus Day parade, celebrating their heritage.
The discussion about replacing Columbus Day began in 1977 during an International Conference of Indigenous People. More evidence from scholarly research revealed the true nature of Christopher Columbus and his horrific mistreatment of Native Peoples.
While it is unlikely that Columbus Day will ever be entirely eliminated, its popularity is on the decline. On the other hand, local Indigenous People’s Day observances now number almost 50 across the country and are on the increase.

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Reality TV star to speak at Legacy event

Reality TV star to speak at Legacy event

Posted on 12 October 2017 by admin

Corcoran to keynote Legacy’s Yes! Event

Submitted report

Reality television star, real estate mogul and self-made millionaire Barbara Corcoran will be the featured speaker at The Legacy Senior Communities annual Yes! Event fundraiser, at 11:30 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 2, at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, (2301 Flora St, Dallas, TX 75201). Corcoran became one of the most successful entrepreneurs in the country after borrowing $1,000, quitting her job as a waitress and starting a tiny real estate company in New York City. That company grew into a $5 billion real estate business. Today, best known as one of the “Sharks” on ABC’s hit TV show, Shark Tank, Corcoran uses her finances and business acumen to invest in startup companies and guide them to success. Corcoran is passionate about helping businesses, and she is a brilliant identifier of opportunity and talent.

SHARK TANK - Barbara Corcoran is a "Shark" on ABC's "Shark Tank." (ABC/Patrick Ecclesine)

SHARK TANK – Barbara Corcoran is a “Shark” on ABC’s “Shark Tank.” (ABC/Patrick Ecclesine)

This year’s event will benefit The Legacy Senior Communities Financial Assistance Fund, which will provide charitable support to future residents of The Legacy Midtown Park, the organization’s rental continuing care retirement community currently under development in Dallas, to help supplement the cost of their care and provide the extra amenities that enrich the quality of their life. In addition, the fund assists seniors using assisted living services that include help with bathing, grooming, dressing, transportation, recovery from illness, and transition from a hospital stay back home, through The Legacy at Home, the organization’s Medicare-certified, not-for-profit home health agency. The Legacy Senior Communities has provided care to seniors and their families in the Greater Dallas area for more than 60 years. The event committee consists of co-chairs Carol Aaron, Dawn Aaron, Sandy Donsky, Linda Garner, Zona Pidgeon, Jody Stein and Karla Steinberg.
“A community is judged by the way it cares for its elders, and I feel it is our collective responsibility to provide a wonderful lifestyle and exemplary care to Jewish seniors in Greater Dallas,” said Carol Aaron, co-chair of The Yes! Event committee. “We encourage everyone to step up and help us continue to not just meet but exceed the needs of seniors and their families now and in the future.”
“Our Financial Assistance Fund provides charitable support for residents who rely on us for care or extra services that enrich their lives,” said Andrea Statman, director of development for The Legacy Senior Communities. “We are appreciative for the community’s continued support, and we are thrilled to have the opportunity to hear from a dynamic individual like Barbara Corcoran while raising funds to support our mission.”
The Yes! Event will also include the presentation of the third annual Carmen Miller Michael — Legacy Senior Communities award. The award pays tribute to Carmen Miller Michael, who was dedicated to improving the quality of life for people dealing with the issues of aging, mental health and cognitive challenges.
“We will honor a truly inspirational individual and trailblazer who shares our commitment to serving others, and we will hear from a motivational entrepreneur during this captivating event,” said Marc R. Stanley, chair of the board of trustees of The Legacy Senior Communities. “We are thankful to all of our donors whose support assists us in providing thriving communities and high-quality care. We find it truly rewarding to provide Jewish seniors with dynamic and enriched lives.”
A ticket for the event is $200. Various sponsorship opportunities are also available. For more information about the Yes! Event and sponsorship opportunities, please visit The Legacy Senior Communities Yes! Event page: http://www.theyesevent.com/.
“We are proud of the positive impact we have on the lives of seniors and their families, both in our community and through our home health agency,” said Melissa Orth, president and CEO of The Legacy Senior Communities. “As we grow and anticipate serving even more seniors with The Legacy Midtown Park, our new rental continuing care retirement community expected to open starting in the fall 2019, we know that these fundraising efforts will allow us to extend our mission even further.”
— Submitted by Amy Jones

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