Archive | April, 2018

Posted on 19 April 2018 by admin

Imagine if your wife had a bird’s-eye view of what you did at the office every day. Would she find herself impressed with your productivity level and work ethic? Or, would she discover a ship that needed much righting? Could she rightly point to multiple items on your business to-do list left unattended to, as well as time that could have been used more efficiently (say, for more sales calls and less YouTube dancing squirrels)?
For many men, this is more of a theoretical scenario than a real one, as offices are typically tucked away in an office park, miles away from the house, and office visits from family members are somewhat of a rarity.
How different is it for our wives? Even as many modern women work outside of the house, the primary duty of taking care of the home typically remains upon them and essentially transforms our homes into their “workplaces.” And there lies the challenge. We live in their “workplaces.” How do we remain profoundly appreciative for all that our wives do for our households, never treating their familial service as a job to be held over their head, or their performance as something subject to our critical analysis?
This challenge proved too difficult for one of my students. He is a keen observer and persistently felt an underlying feeling of annoyance walking through his house each day, his dwelling much too untidy for his liking. His wife didn’t work, and he felt that she had the time to keep the house in order if it was truly a priority in her mind. He knew full well the myriad responsibilities that she had on a daily basis. They had a large family, after all. But, he still felt that there was enough time in the day to also care for the house properly and, of course, have a freshly prepared dinner ready each night by 6.
His fraught emotions turned more and more to charged, critical statements directed to his wife. “I thought you were going to take care of that already.” “Why is dinner never ready on time?” “This house is filthy.” His venting brought him relief from emotions otherwise suppressed, while his wife had to endure the heartache that came with each and every verbal blow.
Recognizing that he had an issue that needed to be dealt with and that he was the responsible party, he came to speak with me. I shared with him the Rambam’s famous injunction that we should always seek the middle path in middos (character traits), and that this requires us to veer to the opposite extreme of wherever we happen to be. That only by moving from one extreme to the other can we free ourselves of our bad habits and ensure that we end up with a balanced approach to life.
As Rabbi Reuven Leuchter explains on Page 89 of Teshuva: Restoring Life:
“The underlying assumption behind the Rambam’s approach is that every midda (character trait) has an extreme quality. When we find ourselves under the influence of a particular midda, it alone determines our perceptions and feelings. We become oblivious to any other perspective or reality. Only by shifting to the opposite extreme can we counteract this blindness. Only by focusing on the direct opposite of what we are experiencing and by treating the initial extreme as if it does not exist can we eventually arrive at a point in the middle.”
I advised my student to apply the Rambam’s methodology to his own life and to veer to the opposite extreme. His critical perspective of his wife was blinding him from ever perceiving a different, more positive reality of his wife’s help in the upkeep of their home. He needed to not only refrain from criticism of any kind, but to desist from any discussions or requests, however innocuous they might seem, concerning the subject of housekeeping. As he was not yet able to walk the middle path, any discussion of housekeeping was likely to turn ugly. The only exception to this rule would be expressions of gratitude for anything his wife might have done in the house. I encouraged him to use his observant nature to discover positive contributions that his wife had made each and every day and to heartily express his gratitude.
“This commitment would need to be for one month,” I told him, “and only then might you attempt to form a healthy, middle-of-the-road approach.”
To my utter delight, a month passed, and with it a renewed sense of peace and tranquility in the student’s home. Both husband and wife found themselves happier. A fresh set of lenses (which only took shape after a few grueling weeks of self-restraint) enabled my student to finally see how hard his wife truly worked for the family, and his wife felt appreciated for the first time in quite a while. After experiencing newfound calm in the house, my student recognized how responsible he had been for creating a toxic environment in the house, as well as how much pressure and anxiety he had exerted on his wife.
Unable to discuss any household needs with his wife, he found himself picking up the broom and the dustpan to take care of problem areas around the house. It dawned on him how rarely he had ever offered to help with the housework that mattered so much to him.
My student could now attempt life in the middle path, but he would need to be vigilant lest he slide back to his old habits.
During this period of the counting of the Omer, we are instructed to use each day as a steppingstone toward self improvement. The Rambam’s advice can help us get there.
Rabbi Yogi Robkin is the co-director of DATA of Plano.

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Making sure the 6 million’s names live on

Posted on 19 April 2018 by admin

I wrote this four days ago, after I had just returned from Reading the Names. The Beth Torah Men’s Club had this inspired idea, began it in 2003, and it’s now a sacred tradition.
This quote is attributed to an elusive figure named Bansky: “A person dies twice. First, when he takes his last breath. Second, when the last person remembers his name.” Whether that was the inspiration, I don’t know. But 15 years ago, someone in the congregation realized that the names of many of the 6 million had never been spoken since their Holocaust deaths, and this annual ritual of remembrance is the result. It is subtitled: “To Every Person, There Is a Name…”
Anyone who wants to read names may do so. It’s a 24-hour vigil, beginning after Havdalah on the Saturday closest to Yom HaShoah, and ending at Sunday’s sundown. (Guess who reads through the wee small hours? Teenagers who have an all-nighter under the watchful supervision of youth group leaders and Learning Center personnel.) This tradition was started by Beth Torah, but was immediately opened to the greater community; now, folks of other synagogues, of churches and mosques, come; some even Skype in — sometimes from as far away as Israel. The names come from Holocaust museums that lend what they have: the Nazis’ own records of their victims. Who lived where? Died where? At what age? Germans have always been efficient at keeping details; the Holocaust was no exception.
People who don’t want to read are encouraged to come, sit quietly and just listen, to hear the names read aloud so that those who have drawn their last breaths now become people who have not died that second time. So, I sat in the darkened synagogue sanctuary until it was my turn to read, listening to others, facing the line of 11 candles lit in memory of our own 6 million, plus the 5 million others who shared their horrific fates.
A table on the bimah was stacked with individual sheets of paper, all covered with those neatly printed German statistics for each of the non-survivors. Four piles, each about a foot high. I calculated: My two great-grandsons will likely have grandchildren of their own when the Reading of the Names is finally completed. Maybe not even that soon…
But we read on. Some of us have difficulty with pronouncing the foreign names, or the towns in which their owners lived (and often died). But less difficulty with some of the death sites so carefully noted: Auschwitz — Sobibor — Babi Yar; we are already too familiar with them. With each name, however, we do our loud-and-clear best, to make sure that these people have not yet fully passed away. Sometimes it’s hard not to cry; I have to exercise a seldom-needed kind of self-control when I realize I’m reading off the names of an entire family: I can tell by the surname, the town in which all lived, their ages — people in their 80s, 60s, 40s, 20s and those who were teens, or 10, 8, 6, 4, 2. But most often, most sadly, they have not even died together in the same place. However, every one of them is coming to life again, off those awful pages, if just for a brief moment…
Israel’s three most special days are in this order: Very soon after Yom HaShoah, when Holocaust survivors are celebrated and victims memorialized, comes Yom HaZikaron, paying tribute to those who have given their all as soldiers of their country, and others who have suffered terrorism. Then, just one day later, comes Yom HaAtzmaut: Independence Day. After first mourning the long-gone, then stopping all activity for an incredible silence to salute those whose bravery and suffering have made their country live, Israelis burst out in a show of life like nowhere else in the world.
That final day is today. Let’s celebrate, too. And let’s mark our calendars now, to join in the Reading of the Names next year.

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Iyar: an opportune month to heal your soul

Posted on 19 April 2018 by admin

The current month of Iyar, the second month in the Jewish calendar, is commonly referred to as the month of healing. This idea is reflected in its name, whose letters form an acronym for “Ani Hashem Rofecha” — “I am God your Healer” (Exodus 15:26).
The above allusion in the title of this month implies not only that this period is opportune for healing, but that there is a special type of healing flowing directly from God. In other words, even though all blessings share a common source, they go through different channels, sometimes demanding investigation to find cures.
Healing, in general, is a rectification process applicable in many contexts. The common theme is to restore something damaged to its original state of health and functioning. In this sense, people speak metaphorically about repairing a relationship or healing a broken heart. Or when the mind becomes wounded, psychological healing involves changing one’s perceptions, shifting from a destructive outlook to provoke more positive thoughts and happiness. In Jewish literature, prescriptions for healing the soul relate to a deeper process called teshuva. But the health of all these elements — body, emotions, mind and soul — are intensely intertwined.
For this reason, when the Torah states in Deuteronomy chapter 4, “Guard yourself and guard your soul scrupulously,” it is interpreted as referring to the mitzvah of protecting one’s physical health. Likewise, “a small hole in the body causes a large hole in the soul” is a statement emphasizing the necessity of maintaining a strong body, the physical receptacle for the soul’s energy to flow. At the same time, the relationship is bidirectional: Spiritual healing — when the soul is nourished and strong — opens the channel for mental and physical wellbeing.
Types of healing
The Talmud discusses various forms of healing. First, there is a preventive remedy, a healing that comes before any harm can be detected. Then there is healing in the form of recovery, where a remnant of the illness lingers to some degree. The highest form of healing not only removes the illness but brings additional strength to the body.
Stemming from the context of the verse, the unique type of healing in this month, coming directly from God, mainly takes the form of prevention — saving a person from illness in the first place. But in the event that some ailment exists, it brings potential for the highest healing — renewed vigor that retroactively removes all trace of illness. This means that even if a person’s conduct leads to poor health, healing from God comes in a completely novel manner, different than through a doctor — as if nothing had happened.
Healing the soul
Maimonides explains that just as the body has different sicknesses and remedies, so too does the soul. An ailing soul means that someone is “not in a good place.” More specifically, in one’s personal rapport with God, an accumulation of poor decisions can lead to feeling disconnected, or some spiritual insensitivity. The nature of this pain as well as the recovery process shares features of both a scarred relationship which needs mending and rehabbing from a physical injury.
There are two general approaches in healing bodily illness: to heal the particular organ that is sick or weakened, and to strengthen the healthy organs and faculties so that they can overcome and heal the sick one. The parallels in the soul are the two approaches in spiritual service — teshuva and good deeds.
Losing time
Even after someone has repaired mistakes, through feelings of regret and resolve, there is another common quest for healing, one that relates to lost time. As we develop in years and wisdom, the consciousness of life’s fragility becomes greater. In the end, there is often a discrepancy between aspirations and accomplishments. Along with this reflection, comes the pain of slip-ups or wasted opportunities. If only I hadn’t said that to her; if only I hadn’t worked such long hours, had spent more time with the family, etc. The famous gnawing dilemma is: Can we heal the past, make up for wasted time?
The first step in the rectification process, the simple formula for teshuva, is acknowledging what went wrong — healthy regret. The next movement is reshaping sadness over previous shortcomings by using that emotion to harness extra energy for the future — the ability to carry out your new vision with intense vigor and productivity. More specifically, one formula for healing the past is living with a present sense of urgency, the desire to do more mitzvahs, to maximize your remaining time on earth.
This sense of urgency may be confused with carpe diem or making the most of every day. But there is a distinct difference in flavor. In an attempt to soothe their tangled mind and a shaky conscience, a person whose motto is “seize the day” may attempt to remain joyful and energized. They may decide to travel places and take in as many serene sights and colorful experiences as possible. In contrast, someone who lives with a sense of urgency has a specific fire inside. They see a fragmented world in front of them, and rush to play a small role in mending it. Quality of living is tied to purpose and to the ability to give back.
And because this urgency and productivity is born from a bitterness which pushed the person to fight harder, those past mistakes are retroactively redeemed and sweetened.

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Come for Hello, Dolly!, see b’tzelem elohim in action

Posted on 19 April 2018 by admin

In Judaism, we have a blessing for everything, which is great because the sages told us to say 100 blessings every day.
Isn’t it wonderful to feel gratitude 100 times a day? There is even a wonderful blessing that thanks G-d for making people different:
Baruch atah Adonai Elohaynu melech ha’olam mishaneh ha’briyot. Blessed are You, O Lord, our God, King of the Universe, who makes people different.
We are supposed to say this blessing when we see someone who looks different and when we see someone with challenges. It gives us an opportunity not only to be thankful for what we have but thankful that we can know people who look at the world differently.
The community is invited to see a very special performance of Hello, Dolly! at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 22. Our troupe is called Habima Theatre and is a joint project of CHAI, Inc. and the Aaron Family JCC. It is designed to promote dignity, respect and acceptance of people with intellectual disabilities. Our performance is the wonderful culmination of the Habima Theatre workshop, which begins each January.
During the course of the workshop, the participants stretch and grow in many ways. Each member of the cast and crew is empowered and enriched by the accomplishment of the group. Twenty adults with developmental delays are the actors in this production. In addition, we have teen and adult volunteers who have been working with us. This will be our 18th year of performances — our chai performance.
So why should you come and bring your children? The excitement and joy shown by each of our performers makes this a very special event. As you sit and watch the struggles and accomplishments, the important Jewish concept of b’tzelem Elohim (being created in God’s image) comes alive. We recognize that each of us brings something special to the world, and we are truly fortunate that we can be in a community with so many different people.
Shalom…from the Shabbat Lady.
Laura Seymour is director of camping services at the Aaron Family Jewish Community Center.

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Israel’s 70th anniversary significant in many ways

Posted on 19 April 2018 by admin

Dear Rabbi,
Everyone is talking about the significant milestone of Israel reaching its 70th anniversary of its birth, and we were wondering if there’s any Jewish significance to the number 70 in relation to this event.
— Marsha and Nathan W.

Dear Marsha and Nathan,
As a citizen of Israel with three children and five grandchildren (k’na hora) living there, this time means a lot to me and my family. (Especially since I’m landing there at 8 a.m. Yom HaAtzmaut morning to see a new grandson.)
This is truly a celebration of the Jewish spirit — that against all the odds, this tiny nation has grown, in such a relatively short time, to become a world power of significance far, far beyond its size in myriad areas. Medicine, sciences, psychology, computer technology, communication, irrigation and defense are some of the most significant, but only a few of the areas in which Israel has risen to the world stage, attracting the world’s most powerful and savvy investors into its market, purchasing its many startups, providing R&D dollars and more.
Of course, it goes without saying that Israel is at the forefront of the spiritual world, boasting many tens of thousands of rabbinical students and children involved in full-time Jewish education.
Sadly, Israel is also at the forefront of battles both physical and spiritual in nature. Despite its many accomplishments, Israel is probably the only country in the world in a constant state of high alert — for those who threaten its very existence. Just as fierce as battles have been, and continue to be, fought over the essence of its spiritual existence; in this case the battle is ,sadly, among fellow Jews.
The deeper side of these facts is that due to Israel’s elevated spiritual nature, its close proximity to the Al-mighty, there’s little room for the “middle of the road” in nearly any arena, no place for mediocrity. It almost fosters the fertile ground for extremism, both religious and secular, in a way that we don’t often observe in the diaspora.
The number 70 in Jewish history has always been a very significant one, such as the prophetic vision — which was fulfilled precisely — for the Jews to sojourn in Babylon for 70 years subsequent to the destruction of the Temple. At the end of those 70 years, the Jews were granted permission by the ruling monarch to return to Israel to rebuild the second Temple. After a long period of starting and stopping, and not without enemies and detractors standing in their way, it finally was rebuilt, ushering in a new period of Jewish history.
The number 7 connotes the fullest sense of the physical world: 7 days of the week, 7 musical tones, etc. The number 70 is the expanded sense of 7, the world with a sense of completion. The source of the Jewish nation was the 70 Jews who went down to Egypt. They were the seeds of Jewish eternity, as the Torah relates at the beginning of the Book of Exodus.
We only hope that this current 70, which is, in a way, a celebration of a rebuilding after the most recent destruction of Europe, will also usher in a new period in our history. Current events in Syria and the surrounding area certainly spell out the many prophesies of the final war, “Gog Umagog,” when the superpowers of the world are meant to battle around Israel, and suddenly realize it’s all about Israel, and the final battle will be turned to her, eliciting God’s own response, ushering in the final chapter of history and the messianic revelation. The headlines surely sound a lot like the prophetic teachings these days, in a scary but exciting way as we watch events unfold. I wish we could know the significance of these events with certainty, but, alas, we no longer have prophecy to know for sure (as I have said before, since the cessation of prophecy we have become a non-prophet organization.)
On one hand we look forward to that time we have long been waiting for; on the other hand, it is meant to be a very unpleasant pre-time of great war. The Sages ask, “How does one save himself from the ‘heat’ (preceding) the Messiah? Through the involvement of Torah study and performance of acts of kindness to fellow Jews.” (Talmud Sanhedrin 98b)
May we use this special time to fulfill the Talmud’s words. And may we soon merit to see the final redemption and ingathering of our people — once and for all — to our beloved homeland, with peace and love amongst all Jews.

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Challenges just ‘bumps in the road’ for Taurogs

Challenges just ‘bumps in the road’ for Taurogs

Posted on 12 April 2018 by admin

Photo: Lester Kuperman
Thirty-seven years later: Marc Taurog; Caryn and Jeff Borden with children Vaughn and Ayva; Jeffrey and Lisa Kuperman with twins Liam and Max.

By Hollace Ava Weiner

Barry and Lynn Taurog and their three youngsters arrived in Fort Worth in January 1980 carrying visitors’ visas that were close to expiration.
Yet they intended to stay. The couple had scoped out the city several months before and were optimistic that a position in a west-side travel agency would turn into the family’s ticket to American citizenship.
Under no circumstance were they going back to South Africa. Despite their luxurious lifestyle in a Johannesburg suburb, the couple were determined to provide their children — Lisa, 7; Caryn, 6; and Marc, 2 — with a life free of apartheid and civil unrest.
The Taurogs’ immigrant story of hard knocks and tenacity is featured in the Gone 2 Texas booklet that will be distributed at this weekend’s conference of the Texas Jewish Historical Society in Fort Worth. The family’s difficult, but successful path to U.S. citizenship took nearly a decade, much longer than the norm.
Periodically, they crossed the border into Canada to renew their visitors’ visas. Their story is particularly topical at a time when the Trump administration is reshaping U.S. immigration policy.
To receive green cards and citizenship, Barry had to fill a job that an American wouldn’t. When his first position as a partner in a Texas travel agency didn’t work out, he made a living managing a Quik Zip convenience store near Carswell Air Force Base. The premises rattled whenever military jets flew overhead.
Barry had operated a pharmacy in South Africa. His credentials did not transfer to the United States. Starting over would entail enrolling in pharmacy school at the University of Texas in Austin and again uprooting the family.
The Taurogs opted to stay in Fort Worth, where Barry spent the rest of his life juggling an array of jobs.
He marketed South African jerky — bilbong — that he cured in a special dryer. At various intervals, he was in jewelry, insurance and real estate. He was a screener with the Transportation Security Administration at DFW Airport for seven years, where he befriended travelers from around the globe. He joined the Masons, his neighborhood Citizens on Patrol and was a docent at the Van Cliburn Piano Competition. He was the catalyst for a dialogue between the Jewish community and First Presbyterian Church, when the latter advocated economic boycotts against Israel.
When he died of cancer in February 2007 at age 67, his funeral was standing room only.
Although the Taurogs were members at Reform Congregation Beth-El, Barry and Lynn were part of the Chevra Kadisha — the burial society — at Ahavath Sholom, the city’s Conservative synagogue.
“It’s the last act of kindness that you can do for someone,” Lynn told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.
Lynn Lawrence Taurog, a hostess, upbeat secretary and organizer, also proved her work ethic. She teamed up with a girlfriend to sell handbags at house parties. She worked at Weber’s pawn shop (owned by a local Jewish family), then at Radio Shack and, finally, at Senior Citizens Services organizing a food bank. Among her hobbies were gin rummy, mah-jongg, jigsaw puzzles and trips to Graceland. (Yes, she was an Elvis fanatic.) She survived her first bout of cancer in 1992, describing it as “a bump in the road.” A decade later, cancer struck again.
She died in April 2007, two months after her husband.
In his emotional eulogies, then-Beth-El Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger observed that “becoming rich” was never Lynn or Barry’s goal. During lives filled with idealism and challenges, “more important things motivated them.”
Their oldest child, Lisa, had high expectations when the family came to the U.S. “We thought we were moving to Disney World, because anyone who had visited America came back with gifts from Disneyland. It was a culture shock. We were slightly disappointed.” At school, “people made fun of my accent. They teased me. I learned very quickly to lose my accent. . . . When we traveled back to South Africa in the summer, I was the first to pack my bags. I remember South Africa vividly.”
The Taurogs lived in the Candleridge neighborhood, in a corner house with a school-bus stop outside the door. On cold mornings, Lisa’s mom made hot chocolate for all the kids. Her dad fed stray dogs and cats, earning the nickname “Dr. Doolittle.” Their Christmas tradition was to go to a movie and a Chinese restaurant with the Muslim family that lived across the street. (All the parents had “funny accents.”)
Married since 2008, Lisa and her husband, Texas native Jeffery Kuperman, are raising twin boys born in 2009. She went into restaurant management and commercial print sales and is part owner of Grease Monkey Rubs, a spice company.
Her sister, Caryn, says that, “although I moved from South Africa when I was 6, I remember a lot — even the smells.” What she likes best about South Africa is that it reminds her of her parents. “It’s their roots. I can feel them when I visit. Going back is like getting a piece of them. It’s like a homecoming. But I am glad I do not live there. I am glad my parents made the choice. There’s not a future there. It’s not safe. The country is corrupt. Although people there have a high standard of living, it’s a trade-off. There’s anxiety about crime. At my relatives’ houses, there are electric fences and guards. You don’t wear your jewelry in public.”
Caryn appreciates how difficult it was for her parents to start over. “The government made it a hard process, because so many people were leaving. There was a brain drain. You couldn’t take all your money or assets.” Whenever her uncles traveled to the States, they brought some of her father’s savings. As violence and economic boycotts afflicted South Africa, the value of the currency plummeted. “It was a bad exchange rate. It’s hard to start over.”
Caryn, who graduated from Texas Tech and has an MBA from SMU, lives in Dallas with her husband, Jeff Borden and two children.
Marc Taurog, a software engineer with a home in Euless, was a toddler when his family left South Africa. He had built his first computer by age 8. Marc has clear memories of visits to South Africa. Once he fell in his grandmother’s pool, and the gardener fished him out. His grandmother brushed crumbs from the kitchen table into a pie pan that she set outdoors for the birds.
When his cousins used to visit Texas, they stocked up on blue jeans and electronics, items hard to find in South Africa. “The country had very few American imports.” Best of all were summertime visits from his grandparents, who stayed through the High Holidays. “It was really special. Visits are so few and far between when you live so far away.”
Which relatives still remain in South Africa? On the maternal side, an aunt, uncle and their married son. On the paternal side, one uncle with four children. “They are very nationalistic,” Marc said. “They would never leave. I’m glad my parents did. Dad was 40 when he picked up and came to the States. It took a lot of guts.”

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Dallas Doings: Beth Torah, Shearith Israel, SWJC, Jill Biden

Posted on 12 April 2018 by admin

This weekend is Beth Torah’s ‘Reading of the Names’

Congregation Beth Torah’s annual 24-hour Holocaust vigil begins at 9 p.m., Saturday, April 14, at the synagogue, 720 Lookout Drive in Richardson. People from many faiths in North Texas will read the names of thousands of people murdered in the Holocaust.
Beth Torah’s Men’s Club has organized the “Reading of the Names” event every year since 2002 to preserve the memories of the Nazis’ 11 million victims, 6 million of them Jews.
“Most of the victims were only known by a number and were never given a proper memorial,” said Ed Matisoff, co-chair of the project. “The Dallas community has the opportunity to keep their memories alive by reading and listening to the names. It’s both an obligation and an honor for us to do this.”
The event begins with a candlelighting ceremony in the synagogue sanctuary. The theme is “Unto Every Person There Is A Name,” the title of an Israeli poem about the Holocaust.
Then, in 15-minute shifts, volunteers of all ages and faiths will read the names, ages and hometowns of individual victims, as well as the dates of their deaths. The details are supplied by Yad Vashem, the Holocaust memorial, museum and research institute in Jerusalem, as well as the United States Holocaust Museum. The readings will pause periodically for the “Mourner’s Kaddish.”
“The entire community is invited, and we’re very grateful that more people join us every year, both as readers and to listen to the names,” said Jeff Markowitz, co-chair of the project. “It’s hard to put into words just what an emotional, meaningful experience this is for everyone involved.”
Some of the spiritual leaders taking part this year include Rabbi Elana Zelony of Beth Torah, Shakeel Muhammad and Dr. Mohamed Lazzouni of the Islamic Association of Collin County, Dr. Robert Hunt of Global Theological Education and The Center for Evangelism and Missional Church Studies at SMU, Dr. Michael Perry of King’s Right Hand Ministries, and Niransan Hanu Manna of Sai Baba Center of Dallas. Representatives of many houses of worship, schools and organizations will participate, and some readers will take part from around the world through Skype.
“The Reading of the Names” will continues through the night, and then will pause at 9:45 a.m. Sunday for a breakfast program featuring Dan Spigel, film director of House of the Generals. The program will consist of the screening of the film followed by a Q & A with Spigel.
The readings will then resume at 11 a.m., culminating in a closing ceremony from 8:30-9 p.m.

—Submitted by
Laura Matisoff

Marsha Lev: Shearith Israel’s Torah Fund honoree

Shearith Israel SISterhood will recognize Marsha Lev as this year’s Torah Fund honoree at a brunch to take place at 11:30 a.m., Sunday, April 29, at Congregation Shearith Israel, 9401 Douglas Ave. in Dallas.
Marsha was born in Waco and is a graduate of the University of Texas, where she received a B.S. in special education. Upon graduation, she moved to Dallas and taught in the Dallas ISD for eight years, then began a new career in retail.
She and her husband, Mike, (z”l) were married in June 1979 and joined Shearith Israel two years later. After the birth of her first child, Eric, in 1981, Marsha joined SISterhood and took on various positions, including Oneg Shabbat catering chair and later College Connection chair. Over the years, she held several vice presidencies and became SISterhood president in 1995. The Shearith Israel SISterhood Camp Ramah Endowment Fund was established during her tenure. It was during those years in SISterhood that she formed many long-lasting friendships and gained myriad leadership skills.
Marsha sat on Shearith Israel’s board of directors until May 2017, a span of over 20 years, and chaired various committees. She was the Sandwich Drive chair for many years, and from 2015-2017, served as house committee chair. Marsha was instrumental in SISterhood’s purchase of new chairs for the congregation.
In the community, Marsha is involved with Women’s Philanthropy of Federation and has been a co-chair for several Dallas Federation divisions over the years. She is a life member of Hadassah. Marsha has two sons, Eric and Jordan.
Cost of the brunch per individual is $36, plus a minimum donation of $18 to the Torah Fund. Donors who give $180 or more will receive a Torah Fund pin, with this year’s design featuring the number 100 in raised letters and encased in a silver frame along with the Hebrew words “Mah Tovu” (how good) from the prayer uttered upon entering the synagogue each morning.
Please use the online payment option accessible at https://sisterhood.shearith.org/event/sis_torahfund2018/ to pay. Payment due date is Tuesday, April 17.
For further information, contact Sisterhood Torah Fund Vice President Janet Jerrow,
j_jerrow@hotmail.com or Meryl Nason, mgnsoc@sbcglobal.net.

—Submitted by
Janet Jerrow

Lynn will keynote SWJC annual meeting

SWJC will hold its annual meeting, at 7:30 p.m., Monday, April 16, at Temple Shalom, 6930 Alpha Road. Dinner will precede the program at 6:30 p.m. Barbara M.G. Lynn, Chief Judge for the Northern District of Texas will speak on “The Federal Bench: How I Got Here, What It’s Like, and How Will It Be in the Future.”
Lynn began her judgeship on Feb. 14, 2000 and became the first female chief judge May 1, 2016. A summa cum laude graduate of the University of Virginia, Lynn graduated first in her class at SMU’s Dedman School of Law in 1976. Upon her graduation from law school, she joined the Dallas law firm of Carrington, Coleman, Sloman & Blumenthal, LLP, and remained there until she took the bench.
The program is free and open to the public; however, dinner is available for purchase at $15 per person. A vegetable plate is available upon request. Food is provided by Catering by Larry. Dinner reservations are required and meeting reservations are requested. Kindly pre-pay dinner reservations via cash, check or credit card by contacting Susan Myers at 214-361-0018 or email susan@swjc.org.
Event chairs are Andrew Farkas and Jonathan Spigel.
SWJC Officers are President Susie Salfield Avnery, Founding Chair Harry Ploss, Immediate Past Chair Jonathan M. Spigel, Vice President Programming Nelda Golden, Vice Presidents Fundraising Cindy Ray and Keo Strull, Vice President Community Relations Rose Marie Stromberg, Secretary Marla Greenberg Janco, and Treasurer Alan L. Tolmas. Board of directors are Hilary Blake, Richard Barrett-Cuetara, Gordon Cizon, Michael B. Cohen, Andy Farkas, Ardo Fuentes, Catalina E. Garcia, Kenneth R. Glaser, Michael B. Glazer, Robert Alan Goldberg, Janet S. Goldsmith, Brenda Jackson, Mark E. Jacobs, Mel Meyers, Michelle E. Shriro, and Dr. Marion Sobol-Helgason. Incoming Board members are Kevin Bolton, Lynn Towery and Anita Weinstein.
FDR and the Jews: apathy or adulation?
In honor of Yom HaShoah, Ted Rubin will present a program on President Franklin D. Roosevelt at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 12, at Tiferet Israel, 10909 Hillcrest Road in Dallas.
Many have accused FDR as being apathetic during his presidency from 1933-1945. Could he have done more?
Why then, during his four presidential victories, specifically 1940 and 1944, did over 90 percent of the Jewish electorate vote for FDR?
Decades after his death, and with full knowledge of Nazi atrocities, his picture adorned the walls of many Jewish businesses, Today, for many Jewish Americans, his leadership is remembered with reverence.
Rubin’s presentation will focus on the times which may have shaped Roosevelt’s actions in the rescue of European Jews, including The Attitudes of the Nation, the quota system, efforts of resettlement, the obstruction of the State Department, Jewish intransigence and the War Refugee Board.
There is no charge for the event and light snacks will be served. For more information and to make reservations, please email: jennifer@tiferetisrael.org or call 214-691-3611.

—Submitted by
Jennifer Williams

Still time to get tickets to hear Jill Biden at JFS fundraiser, April 25

Jewish Family Service has released individual tickets for its Woman to Woman 2018 Luncheon with Dr. Jill Biden, wife of former Vice President Joe Biden, as the keynote speaker. This year’s luncheon will take place at noon, Wednesday, April 25, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Registration begins at
10 a.m.
Retired WFAA news anchor, Gloria Campos, will serve as master of ceremonies for the event.
Biden, lifelong educator and military mom, will focus on her notable personal accomplishments, which include advocating for issues that impact JFS clients — breast cancer through the Biden Breast Health Initiative, family violence through the Biden Foundation, and serving as a voice for children through her position as board chair of the international nonprofit, Save the Children.
“We look forward to hearing from Dr. Biden as a leader and positive influence on so many causes shaping our community for the better,” said JFS CEO, Steve Banta.
The Woman to Woman event provides critical funding to support JFS’ nationally accredited mental health and social services available to anyone in need regardless of race, religion, ethnicity or ability to pay. Last year, JFS provided mental health and social services to more than 13,000 individuals and families throughout the greater Dallas area.
Individual tickets are now on sale for $250 each. A limited number of Young Adult Tickets are available for those under 35 for just $100. Sponsorships for the luncheon are also available starting at $1,000 and include numerous benefits including an exclusive sponsor prize drawing, valet parking passes, and the opportunity to attend a VIP reception with Biden. As always, men are welcome to attend.
Event Co-Chairs are Susan Frapart, Linda Garner, Sherry Goldberg, Julie Liberman, Beverly Rossel, Monica Susman, Laura Weinstein and founding chair Ethel Zale.
For individual tickets, please visit www.jsdallas.org/woman. For sponsorship or underwriting, please contact Keo Strull, donor and event specialist at kstrull@jfsdallas.org. For marketing or media, please contact Leah Guskin, Director of Marketing & Communication at lguskin@jfsdallas.org.
For more information about the Woman to Woman 2018 Luncheon, please visit www.jfsdallas.org/woman.

—Submitted by
Leah Guskin

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Hail Drebin: America’s Fighting Jew in 20th century

Posted on 12 April 2018 by admin

When it comes to choosing topics to write about, I am always a “sucker” for the unusual, out-of-the-ordinary and unorthodox.
An historical character who fits these descriptors is Samuel Drebin, a Russian Ukrainian Jew, who five months after arriving in New York in 1899, decided to join the U.S. Army at age 21.
After a brief training period, he was shipped to the Philippines to help put down a native insurrection led by the rebel leader Emilio Aguinaldo.
After distinguishing himself in battle, Drebin joined troops headed toward China, assisting in the rescue of westerners trapped in Beijing during the Boxer Rebellion, where he received additional recognition as a courageous fighter.
With the end of the Rebellion in 1901, Drebin was released from active duty and failed to find satisfaction in a succession of manual-labor jobs.
At the start of the Russo-Japanese War, Drebin attempted to fight for the Japanese, but he was quickly turned down since he couldn’t speak a word of Japanese and they also thought he might be a Russian spy.
Having experienced success as a soldier, Drebin re-enlisted in 1904 at Fort Bliss, Texas, where he trained and became proficient in the use of the Army’s new machine guns.
After Drebin’s second army enlistment ended, his newly acquired machine-gun skills helped him find work as a security guard in the Panama Canal Zone and as a fighter in the Nicaraguan rebel army.
With a reputation as a fighting soldier, Drebin was recruited for several liberation movements, eventually joining Gen. “Black Jack” Pershing in January 1917 in an unsuccessful attempt to capture Pancho Villa.
As Pershing’s personal scout during the search for Villa, Drebin earned Pershing’s respect, resulting in a genuine friendship.
With the inability to find or capture Pancho Villa and the looming entry of the United States into the World War in Europe, the search for Villa was ended.
Drebin married and seemed to be settling down in El Paso. The Drebins had a child and life seemed to be slowing down for Sam.
With the start of World War I, however, he was drawn back into the Army, joining the heaviest fighting in France.
True to form, Drebin, an excellent soldier-fighter, was recognized by the French, British and Americans with some of their nations’ highest awards.
Perhaps Drebins greatest award was the statement by the Commander of the American Expeditionary Forces, Pershing, calling him “the finest soldier and one of the bravest men I ever knew.”
Learning of his wife’s infidelity while he was away, Drebin divorced her and settled in El Paso, establishing a prospering insurance business.
In 1921, Pershing called Drebin to duty once more to join Alvin York as honorary pallbearers at the burial of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.
Having served three tours of duty, First Sgt. Samuel Drebin had fought in more wars than any other American soldier.
In addition to the medals and ribbons awarded Drebin, another outstanding honor was a poem honoring his memory by the famous writer Damon Runyon in 1942:
Hail Drebin!
There’s a story in that paper I just tossed upon the floor that speaks of prejudice against the Jews;
There’s a photo on the table that’s a memory of the war And a man who never figured in the news.
There’s a cross upon his breast — That’s the D.S.C., (Distinguished Service Cross) The Croix de Guerre, the Militaire — These, too.
And there’s a heart beneath the medals That beats loyal, brave and true — That’s Drebin, A Jew.
Now whenever I read articles that breath of racial hate Or hear arguments that hold his kind to scorn,
I always see that photo With the cap upon his pate And the nose the size of Bugler Dugan’s horn.
I see upon his breast The D.S.C, The Croix de Guerre, the Militaire — These, too.
And I think, Thank God Almighty We have more than a few Like Drebin A Jew!

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Father Desbois’ newest accolade fittingly earned

Posted on 12 April 2018 by admin

We always remember the Holocaust. How could we not? But today, Yom HaShoah, it should be at the top of our minds. And it’s the right day to think about Father Patrick Desbois, the Roman Catholic priest who received something special last fall: The Human Rights Prize, given annually by the Lantos Foundation for Human Rights and Justice.
What did the cleric do to earn this honor? Well, his life’s work, post-Holocaust, has been recognizing more than a million unknown victims of the Nazis. Writing in the Times of Israel, Eric Cortellessa reported that the honoree “has focused on the Jews who were killed by mass shootings by Nazi units in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, Moldova and Romania, between 1941 and 1944.”
Father Desbois now teaches in the Center for Jewish Civilization at Georgetown University. This made it easy for him to attend the reception on Washington’s Capitol Hill, where he was lauded as “a vital voice standing up for the values of decency, dignity, freedom and justice.” The honoring Foundation is that of Annette and Tom Lantos, who both survived the Holocaust. You may recognize Tom’s name: a Democrat from California who died in 2008, he served in the U.S. House of Representatives – the only Survivor ever to be a member of Congress.
Yahad-In-Unum is the French organization Desbois founded 14 years ago to locate mass graves of Jewish victims. He documented its results in his first book, The Holocaust by Bullets, which was published in 2008 and won that year’s National Jewish Book Award; its subtitle is A Priest’s Journey to Uncover the Truth Behind the Murder of 1.5 Million Jews. At that time, he was credited with “virtually single-handedly undertaking the task of excavating the history of previously undocumented Jewish victims of the Holocaust.”
One critic assessed his book realistically as “… not particularly well-structured or well-written, but its importance far outweighs its narrative flaws,” because Desbois is credited with using “wartime documents, interviews with locals, and the application of modern forensic practices on long-hidden gravesites” in his work. More recently, he wrote “In Broad Daylight: The Secret Procedures Behind the Holocaust by Bullets,” also based on research and firsthand accounts. Another reviewer, not put off by writing style, was inspired to say its author “…might be one of the greatest detectives of all time.”
Father Desbois, ordained in 1985 at age 31, first worked as a math teacher for the French government in Africa, then moved to Calcutta, where he helped Mother Teresa establish her homes for the dying. His priestly work includes directing the church’s Episcopal Committee for Relations with Judaism, which connects to the French Conference of Bishops, and serving the Vatican as a consultant on relations with Judaism. He was also a personal aide to the late Archbishop of Paris, Jean-Marie Lustiger, the Jew who converted to Catholicism and became a priest.
(So soon after Easter, it’s interesting to consider Lustiger’s epitaph, which he wrote himself, as a sidelight to Desbois accomplishments: “I was born a Jew. I received the name of my paternal grandfather, Aaron. Christian by faith and by baptism, I remained a Jew, as did the Apostles.” Lustiger also retained his surname, which may ring the bell of recognition for those of us who know even a little Yiddish: in that language, “Lustig” means “fun,” and those of us who grew up with grandparents whose native tongue was Yiddish, and who sang holiday songs to us in their first language, surely remember “Oy Chanukah,” which calls the holiday both a “freilicher” and a “lustiger,” comparatives that translate to happier than just plain happy, more fun than ordinary fun.)
Father Desbois is in good company as a Lantos winner: prior recipients have included both the Dalai Lama and Elie Wiesel. But the prize presenter offered this chilling introduction: “There is nothing more human than the capacity to kill.” Should we believe that? Do we want to believe that?

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Knots on Tefillin spell out the name of G-d

Posted on 12 April 2018 by admin

Dear Ben,
My apologies for the Pesach interlude while in the midst of answering your questions regarding your son’s Tefillin for his bar mitzvah. Now we’re back on track, and we’ll proceed to attempt to address the rest of your questions.
You asked what is the meaning of the various knots which are tied in the Tefillin straps. The knots are tied in a fascinating way, together spelling the name of G-d, Sha-dai; the Hebrew letters shin, dalet and yud (which is the same name of G-d on the outside of the mezuzah, hence the letter shin often symbolically carved on the mezuzah case).
The head Tefillin actually has the letter shin engraved upon it, and the letter shin is formed upon the hand when the strap is wrapped around the hand (in Ashkenazic and many other customs). The letter dalet is formed by the knot tying the head Tefillin. The yud is formed by the knot tying the hand tefillin. In this way, the Jew donning his Tefillin is enwrapped and cloaked by the name of G-d.
The Talmud says that this is in fulfillment of the verse,” And all the peoples of the earth shall see that the Name of G-d is called upon you and they shall be awed by you” (Deuteronomy. 28:10; see Talmud Menachos 35b). There are numerous stories throughout Jewish history in which Jews were saved or rescued by virtue of the awe-struck state of their persecutors when they were confronted by Jews wearing their Tefillin, cloaked by the Name of G-d and glowing with the holiness of His name. Sadly, that wasn’t always the case, such as many less happy endings in the Holocaust.
This concept is further alluding to a very deep connection between G-d and the Jewish people. The Talmud, (Berachos 6a) teaches that “G-d wears Tefillin.” Our Tefillin mirror His “Tefillin”; the awe the nations have for us when wearing Tefillin is indicative of the awe of G-d Himself. In our Tefillin, it says “Shema Yisrael … our Lord is One,” in the Al-mighty’s Tefillin it says, “Who is like Your people, Israel, One nation on earth…” (I Chron. 17:21). The Tefillin are an expression of the deep, intimate connection, the bonding of love and respect between G-d and the Jewish people.
This statement is actually one of the most mysterious teachings in the entire Talmud. G-d wears Tefillin? We believe G-d has no physical body. We are furthermore taught that when Moses asked G-d to show him the secret of Divine Providence, G-d showed him the “knot of His head Tefillin.” What does this mean?
One way of understanding this is the vital importance of Jewish history. Although we can’t fathom G-d directly, we can have insight into His ways by looking back into history, seeing how He interacts with us in myriad situations. This is the hint into G-d’s “Tefillin,” which are allegorically referring to His connection with us; the knot on the back of the head Tefillin — hinting to looking back into history. (This I heard in my youth from R’ Ahron Soloveichik ob’m).
We can follow this thought to another level. The deep sources teach us that chesed (love and kindness) are reflected in the right hand and din;(strict judgement) and power are in the left. This, teach the Kabbalistic sages, goes back to the source of creation and the emanations of G-d’s attributes in the highest spiritual worlds. The crown above it all, which is the source of all emanations, is the place where the Tefillin rest (see Tikunei Zohar 17a).
An insight into the meaning of this is that G-d exercises His midos, or traits, in controlling the world, which at times seem contradictory, such as kindness and judgement. In truth, however, they all go back to the Oneness of G-d; they all fit into His master plan. The purpose, above all, is the Jewish people which manifest His purpose in creation through their teaching and fulfillment of Torah; a light unto the nations.
That is the crown of the Tefillin; the purpose which towers above and beyond all purposes in G-d’s creation and Providence. The two Tefillin straps, one resting on the right and one on the left, represent the two opposing main character traits of kindness and judgement. These two straps are bonded together in the knot which holds the head Tefillin, the crown, in place; bonding together these two opposing traits into one unity of purpose emanating from the crown of the Oneness of G-d and the Jewish people.
This is the profound message of the knot of the head Tefillin – on the back of the head; back into history – where these seemingly cross-purposes of Providence meld into one as they emanate from the crown, the source of all purpose, from the Al-mighty. (See more in The Aryeh Kaplan Anthology II, NCSY Press, pages 253-9).
When we view the mitzvos from their deeper perspective, even the most seemingly trivial details reveal a treasure-trove of depth and meaning.

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