Archive | December, 2018

Pancake house honors WWII vet for continued service

Pancake house honors WWII vet for continued service

Posted on 27 December 2018 by admin

From left, NEC Jerry Benjamin, JWV Post 256; Original Pancake House co-owner Jonathan Seyoum; Maurice “Maury” Schermann; Betty Bailey; Original Pancake House co-owner Mark Davis Bailey; Mark’s wife, Judy; store general manager Dan Williamson; and store manager Alex Vignan.

Maurice “Maury” Schermann, a 95-year old Army Air Corps veteran of World War II and longtime member of Jewish War Veterans Dallas Post 256, was honored in a surprise ceremony at his favorite location of the Original Pancake House restaurant chain on Veteran’s Day weekend.
Mark Davis Bailey, co-owner of the eight-location DFW group, presented Schermann with a Stars & Stripes-themed quilt hand-crafted by his mother, Betty.
“Mr. Schermann has been more of a blessing to [our] team and guests than we could ever be to him. He won’t even let us buy his meal,” Bailey said. “His upbeat outlook, friendly personality and determination to keep serving inspires us all.”
Bailey estimated that over the course of Schermann’s 12-plus years as an Original Pancake House regular, he has raised more than $100,000 through individual efforts and as part of Post 256’s semiannual poppy drives.
All funds collected go toward the JWV’s mission, supporting local hospitalized and homeless veterans, including holiday visits and gift bags, special-occasion meal events and “quality of life” upgrades, such as recreation and therapy room equipment, for the Dallas and Bonham, VA, facilities.
Schermann’s devotion to all things “veteran,” along with his warm personality, have endeared him to customers and Original Pancake House management. He has become an honorary member of the Bailey family and regular patrons often ask about Schermann if he’s not at his customary table near the entrance, usually holding a JWV collection bucket.

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TTI honors Goldberg, Stein at annual gala

TTI honors Goldberg, Stein at annual gala

Posted on 27 December 2018 by admin

Texas Torah Institute student surround, bottom row from left, Ken Goldberg, Lois Goldberg, Bob Goldberg and Neil Goldberg at the school’s Scholarship Gala.
Photos: Jay Atlas

“L’Dor v’Dor: The Eternal Chain” was the theme of Texas Torah Institute’s 15th annual Scholarship Gala Dec. 15 at the Renaissance Dallas Addison Hotel.
TTI honored Bob Goldberg with its Lifetime Achievement Award and Shane Stein with its Community Leadership Award.
Lt. Col. Allen West was the guest speaker.

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UPDATE: Fein, 84, completes her journey

UPDATE: Fein, 84, completes her journey

Posted on 27 December 2018 by admin

Photo: Courtesy University of Texas Dallas
Janet Fein, 84, is among the newest graduates in the Class of 2018, honored with her diploma by UT Dallas President Richard Benson.

By Deb Silverthorn

Janet Fein, 84, graduated from the University of Texas at Dallas on Dec. 19, six years after returning to school, bound and determined to earn her bachelor of arts degree in sociology.
One of nearly 2,800 students receiving their diplomas, Fein’s story has traveled the globe, picked up by more than 850 entities since first appearing in a Dec. 6 Texas Jewish Post article.
“I can’t even express how overwhelmed I feel and how appreciative I am of everyone’s support and help and concern,” said Fein, who received accolades, calls from near and far, and bouquets of flowers, including one from UTD President Richard Benson.
“We’re honored to celebrate the graduation of Janet Fein, our 84-year-young sociology major,” Benson said. “We’re thrilled she has accomplished her longtime dream to be the proud holder of an undergraduate degree. Congratulations; she and other students have made UTD a better place.”
Fein, a New York native who graduated from high school at 16, received her associate’s degree in 1995, then returned to school in 2012 after retiring from her work at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital.
Fein completed her last courses online after her health made her wheelchair bound. She had taken a DART bus to UTD, oxygen in tow.
Lauded by her children, grandchildren, sister and brother-in-law, friends and co-workers and thousands in the auditorium who broke into cheers and applause, many in a standing ovation, Fein was glowing throughout the ceremony – wheeled up to the stage to collect handshakes, hugs and her diploma.
Going out for a celebratory meal at a favorite Chinese restaurant, the owner showed her an article and translated it to English for her. Newspapers, television and radio stations, and more have been calling.

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Keeping the Shabbat roast chicken tradition alive

Keeping the Shabbat roast chicken tradition alive

Posted on 27 December 2018 by admin

Photo: Ronnie Fein
Roast chicken is a Friday-night staple in Jewish homes.

By Ronnie Fein

There’s no rule that says Jews are required to eat chicken on Shabbat — that is, no rule was ever handed down from a rabbi or written in the Torah. But it is a long-standing practice for many Eastern European Jewish families to serve roast chicken on Friday night.
Why did it become the iconic Shabbat dinner? Probably because meat is considered a luxury, and therefore a fitting centerpiece for the most sacred meal of the week. While chicken may not have the cachet of beef or lamb, maybe that’s the point: It is sumptuous, and yet much more affordable and more widely available than other kinds of meat.
A family in the shtetls might own a cow, but who would ever think to slaughter an entire cow and the precious source of milk and cheese? On the other hand, there were always a few chickens clucking around the yard. Chickens mature and reproduce quickly, assuring an ample supply of eggs and also a plump bird for a Shabbat dinner.
There’s this, too: Chicken is flavorful but mild. It takes to almost any seasoning. It’s hard not to like because you can cook it so many ways. The great Julia Child — who could cook anything — said it was her favorite dinner. “Roast chicken has always been one of life’s great pleasures,” she said.
But how do you make perfect roasted chicken? It is one of those deceptively simple recipes, not elaborate or difficult, and more about what not to do. You can season it the way you like, stuff it or not, baste it or not, make gravy or not — just don’t overcook it. Overcooked chicken is dry and chewy — “a shame,” according to Child.
First, begin with a plump, at least 4-pound, preferably kosher chicken (because they are brined and immensely flavorful). Keep it whole, because that helps keep the meat moist. There is such a thing as a true “roasting chicken” — which is an older, more flavorful bird — but most markets simply sell a whole chicken. It could be a broiler-fryer or a roasting chicken and you simply can’t tell. A good butcher will know the difference between a roasting bird and others, and you can always ask.
Rinse the bird, discard any debris inside the cavity, and remove the package of giblets (which you can cook with the chicken or save for stock).
Next, dry the surface, rub the skin with vegetable oil or olive oil, and season it with spices of your choice (my master recipe keeps the seasoning simple). You can stuff the bird if you wish, but if you do, increase the cooking time. I don’t bother trussing the legs together. That may make finished chicken look better, but it keeps the dark meat from cooking as quickly and the white meat may dry out before the dark is done.
To help keep the skin crispy, use a pan that holds heat well: metal, ceramic or Pyrex, as opposed to disposable aluminum. In addition, place the chicken on a rack. A rack allows all surfaces to be exposed to the dry heat and also prevents the chicken from sitting in its own rendered fat. If you have a vertical poultry roaster, use that.
Start the roasting at 400 (F) degrees, which helps set the skin to proper crispness. Turn the heat down after some initial cooking, otherwise the meat can dry out too quickly.
Basting isn’t necessary; it doesn’t make the meat moister, but it does add flavor. Use whichever basting fluids suit your fancy (stock, wine, fruit juice). Let the bird cook for about 20 minutes before the first basting, so the seasonings will stay on the skin, then baste every 20 minutes or so until about 20 minutes before you expect the bird to be done. Basting after that point will make the skin soggy.
Roasting time for chicken depends on the bird’s weight. I suggest using a meat thermometer to be sure the chicken is fully cooked. Place the thermometer into the thickest part of the inner thigh. The USDA recommends cooking chicken to 165 degrees (F).
To lock in the bird’s delicious natural fluids, let it rest for 15 minutes before you cut it into pieces.

Roast Chicken

For the master roast chicken:
1 whole roasting chicken, 4-6 pounds
1-2 tablespoons olive oil or vegetable oil
Salt, black pepper, garlic powder and paprika
1 cup liquid such as stock or juice

For the lemon-oregano roast chicken:
1 whole roasting chicken, 4-6 pounds
1/3 cup lemon juice
¼ cup olive oil
1 large clove garlic, finely chopped
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh oregano (or 1 teaspoon dried oregano)
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh basil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

For the Master Recipe:
1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees.
2. Remove the plastic bag of giblets from inside the bird. Wash the giblets if you want to roast and eat them. Put them in the roasting pan.
3. Wash the chicken inside and out; dry with paper towels. Place the chicken on a rack in the roasting pan.
4. Rub the surface with the oil. Sprinkle the chicken with salt, pepper, garlic powder and paprika. Place the chicken breast-side down on the rack.
5. Put the chicken in the oven. Roast 15 minutes. Reduce the oven heat to 350 degrees. Roast for 30 minutes, basting once or twice during that time with stock or juice. Turn the chicken breast-side up. Continue to roast the chicken for about 45-60 minutes, or until a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh registers 165 degrees (F), or when the juices run clear when the thigh is pricked with the tines of a fork. Do not baste for the last 20 minutes of roasting time. After you take the chicken out of the oven, let it rest for 15 minutes before you carve it.
For the Lemon-Oregano Roasted Chicken:
Follow the roasting procedure directions for roast chicken, but do not prepare the chicken with vegetable oil and spices and do not use the stock, white wine or juice. Mix the lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, oregano, basil and salt and pepper in a bowl. Either marinate the chicken for at least one hour before cooking or pour over the chicken when you put it in the oven and use the pan fluids for basting.

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Grant funds DJCF series on legacy giving

Posted on 19 December 2018 by admin

A $15,000 grant from the Katherine C. Carmody Charitable Trust will allow the Dallas Jewish Community Foundation and the Southwest Community Foundation to produce a free series that will teach nonprofit organizations how to build a legacy giving program.
These programs will seek legacy gifts to be invested so the nonprofits earn income in the future. The importance of legacy giving also will be discussed.
“Month after month nonprofits spend valuable time fundraising and, for smaller nonprofits, that comes at the expense of their important missions,” according to a statement from the foundations. “Our community’s nonprofits know their respective communities and are fully capable of serving their missions in an effective way. That is why the DJCF/SWCF want nonprofits to prepare legacy giving programs, so they can focus long-term on what is most important — their missions.”
The Dallas Jewish Community Foundation and its DBA, the Southwest Community Foundation, have worked to improve the community and the world through the development and stewardship of philanthropic resources of donors and community partners.
Consistent with this mission, the Foundation has contributed more than $125 million in charitable distributions in the last decade to support a wide range of philanthropic interests, including education, human services, the arts and faith-based organizations.
The legacy giving program’s inaugural session will occur on Feb. 4 and will feature Phil Cubeta, assistant professor of philanthropy at the American College of Financial Services in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Each session is meant for both volunteers and staff of nonprofit agencies. A kosher lunch will be provided.
All nonprofits are welcome to register for this free series of lunch and learns. For information, visit www.djcf.org.

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ISIS leader’s ex-wife describes her ‘Escape and Triumph’

ISIS leader’s ex-wife describes her ‘Escape and Triumph’

Posted on 19 December 2018 by admin

Photo: Courtesy Tania Joya
Tania Joya, an activist and former wife of an ISIS leader, will speak about “Escape and Triumph” at the 2019 Intra-Faith Sisterhood Brunch on Jan. 13.

By Deb Silverthorn

Tania Joya, an activist and former wife of an ISIS leader, will be the featured speaker of the 2019 Intra-Faith Sisterhood Brunch, the theme of which is “Escape and Triumph,” at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 13, at Temple Shalom.
The Temple Shalom Sisterhood is host of the 16th annual brunch, which is open to everyone ages 15 and older.
“Tania will speak about her transition from a marriage to a ranking ISIS member, to one countering the forces of violent extremism, and I believe the audience will be fascinated by her,” said Jerri Grunewald, who is co-chairing the event with Beth Lasher.
Connected by coincidence at an event, Joya immediately struck Grunewald as captivating. “Tania’s evolution as a woman, as a human being and her strength in becoming an independent thinker and role model is a story to be heard.”
The annual Sisterhood Intra-Faith Luncheon is hosted each year by a different Metroplex-area congregation, bringing together sisterhood members from all branches of Judaism. The hosting chapter creates the program and menu, and coordinates the afternoon. Previous guests have been Holocaust survivors, chefs, artists, experts on environmental issues and the history of Jews in Texas.
“Sisterhood is about social justice, about caretaking, about women who are professionals, at-home, who are mothers and those who are not, but it is about leadership and care. The spirit of Tania’s work mirrors a lot of what we are about,” said Grunewald, a former Temple Shalom Sisterhood president, vice president, treasurer and Woman of Valor recipient.
Joya, who grew up northwest of London, is a former extremist who now works in deradicalization. Her ex-husband, Plano native John Georgelas, known since conversion to Islam as Yahya al-Bahrumi, was radicalized as a teenager and, to all knowledge, remains active as the highest-ranking American member of ISIS.
The couple, who met online at age 19, returned to the United States for a time, then moved to Egypt after the Arab uprising in 2011. Her former husband believed that the surroundings were ripe for his sons to grow themselves to become Jihadists, she said. But even then, Joya had doubts.
After the family moved to Syria in 2013, with Joya pregnant with their fourth child, she found the courage to leave, and, with her ex-husband’s help, returned to Plano. Once the family was gone, he became involved with ISIS. She, on the other hand, renounced Islam, remarried and is living a mission of helping others.
Joya is now featured in a Clarion Project documentary called “Jihad Generation.” She is a member of Parents For Peace, an alliance of families affected by extremism that focuses on prevention and de-radicalization from extremism. She recently participated in a TEDx interview and is writing a memoir.
“My goal is to protect other young people from the indoctrination and grooming process that I was vulnerable to,” Joya said. “Prevention programs are the key to protecting all American youth from radicalization.”
Joya wants to help rehabilitate extremist radicals, to teach them skills and to give them a sense of community and the opportunity to reintegrate into society and be good citizens. “Jihadists need to be heard because if we don’t know their arguments, and how poor their arguments are, we’re not going to be able to discuss and refute them,” she said.
Co-chair Lasher, a former Temple Shalom Sisterhood vice president, said Joya’s story fits well with Sisterhood’s mission.
“Sisterhood had gone through a metamorphosis, beautifully meeting the diversity of our population, of women of all ages and stages,” she said. “In this season of #metoo and women’s strength, Tania’s story is so current and appropriate. While we of the congregations throughout Dallas might practice our Judaism differently, the tenets and how we live our lives is more alike than not.”
“Tania — a woman like many of us with a story like none of us — is dynamic, and her vision is one to respect and support,” Lasher said. “As a Sisterhood, and as a community, we’re proud to present her and what she has to give.”
For more information, visit bit.ly/2LnSYma. The brunch costs $20 per person, and registration is required by Jan. 3. To RSVP for more information, contact Toba Reifer at 972-898-4828 or email reifernotary@gmail.com.

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Flaky strudel just like Bubbe made

Flaky strudel just like Bubbe made

Posted on 19 December 2018 by admin

Photo: Chaya Rappoport
Apple Strudel

By Chaya Rappoport

(The Nosher via JTA) — My bubbe is Swiss and one of the best bakers I know. My childhood memories are filled with visions of her glazed schnecken (Swiss buns like rugelach), her rich babkas and her waehes, which are seasonal Swiss fruit tarts.
When I first started baking, I knew I wanted to re-create those recipes from my childhood. But no matter what I did, and how many times I called her for advice and instruction, they never came out quite the same.
One year when she was visiting from Switzerland, I decided to make strudel in an effort to impress her. I should have known right then I was setting myself up for failure.
Strudel, a traditional Austrian pastry filled with apples and raisins that became popular in Eastern European Jewish communities, is made with a notoriously finicky dough similar to phyllo. It needs to be rolled out very thinly, and it’s commonly considered best left to experienced European grandmothers.
Well, an experienced European grandmother I am not, and when I started researching recipes, I got intimidated and decided instead to make something closer to a Danish than a strudel — just as delicious, and far easier, right? Needless to say, my grandmother was not impressed.
“This isn’t strudel, Chaya,” she informed me after a glance at the pretty plaited Danish I’d made. “I’ll have to teach you how to make it.”
I knew she was right. And when my grandmother returned to Switzerland, I decided I’d have to learn how to make it myself. I finally did — and guess what? It’s not at all as hard as it sounds. The apple filling’s as easy as pie (no, but really), the traditional breadcrumbs are simply toasted in butter and the dough has five ingredients and comes together by hand. Stretching it out to get it paper thin can be tricky — but do your best, be gentle and if the dough rips, just patch it together by hand.
It might take you one or two times to perfect it, but even imperfect strudel is still strudel, and there’s nothing a spoonful of schlag (whipped cream) or a scoop of vanilla ice cream can’t fix.
This strudel is insanely flaky, completely authentic and, best of all, I know it will finally satisfy even my bubbe.

Apple Strudel

For the dough:
1¼ cups all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon fine sea salt
¼ cup vegetable water
2 tablespoons sugar
1/3 cup water
For the filling:
¾ cup raisins
¼ cup rum
5 large Granny Smith apples
Juice of 1 lemon
½ cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
8 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
½ cup breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons sugar
Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting
Lightly sweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream, for serving
Directions:
1. Combine the raisins with the rum and microwave them together for 30 seconds. Let them sit to plump while you make the dough.
2. Make the dough: Combine the flour and salt in a medium bowl. Add the oil and water and mix with your hands until a rough dough forms.
3. Turn it out onto a lightly floured counter and knead for 10 minutes, until soft and silky.
4. Form it into a ball, place it on the counter and cover with a clean tea towel. Let rest for a half-hour.
5. Meanwhile, make the filling: Peel the apples and slice them into matchsticks. In a large bowl, toss them with the lemon juice, sugar, vanilla and rum raisins.
6. Make the breadcrumbs: In a skillet over medium-low heat, melt 3 tablespoons of the butter. Add the breadcrumbs and sugar. Stir to coat, and cook until crumbs are golden brown and fragrant. Transfer to a bowl and set aside.
7. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Melt the remaining 5 tablespoons of butter in a small saucepan; set aside.
8. Roll out your dough. Cover your work surface with a clean tea towel that’s at least 24 by 32 inches. The long side should be horizontal to you. Sprinkle the cloth lightly with flour. Place the dough in the middle, sprinkle it very lightly with flour and roll in both directions, picking it up and moving it around as you go, until it’s 10 by 13 inches or you can’t roll it out anymore. Re-flour the dough if you feel it sticking.
9. Ball your hands into fists, put them under the rolled-out dough and gently start stretching the dough using the back of your hands.
10. Pull the edges of the dough gently with your fingers and continue stretching it with the back of your fists. Continue stretching until the dough is about 16 by 24 inches.
11. Brush the dough evenly with half of the reserved melted butter. On the right side of the rectangle, a few inches from the end, spread the breadcrumbs top to bottom in a thick line, leaving margins at the top and bottom.
12. Pile the apple mixture over the crumbs. Stretch the top and bottom edges of the dough over the apple mixture. Pull the right edge of the dough up and over the filling as far as it will go without tearing. Working carefully, use the towel to roll up the strudel all the way. Place the parchment paper from your baking sheet at the edge of the roll and roll the strudel onto it.
13. Brush the strudel generously all over with the remaining butter. Bake for 25 minutes, then rotate. Bake for another 20-25 minutes, or until the dough is crisp and golden brown.
14. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and let the strudel cool on a rack for at least 20 minutes before serving. Dust with confectioners’ sugar and slice into pieces to serve with either whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.
Serves 10.
Chaya Rappoport is the blogger, baker and picture taker behind retrolillies.wordpress.com. Currently a pastry sous chef at a Brooklyn bakery, she’s been blogging since 2012 and her work has been featured on The Feed Feed, Delish.com, Food and Wine, and Conde Nast Traveler.
The Nosher food blog offers an array of new and classic Jewish recipes and food news, from Europe to Yemen, from challah to shakshuka and beyond. Check it out at www.TheNosher.com.

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Centenarian’s secret: Good wine, cigars and cognac

Centenarian’s secret: Good wine, cigars and cognac

Posted on 19 December 2018 by admin

Photo: Courtesy Barnett Family
Lou Barnett at 100

By Sharon Wisch-Ray

The secret to long-life is simple, Fort Worth’s Lou Barnett said a few days before his 100th birthday Nov. 22.
“Good wine, good cigars and good cognac,” he explained with a twinkle in his eye.
Barnett is not your average 100-year-old. He reads almost a book a day often into the wee hours of the morning (He was making his way through John Grisham’s “The Reckoning” at the time of the interview). He lives in the home he built with his wife in 1950. His has been a full and rich life
Born on Nov. 22, 1918, and raised in Malden, Massachusetts, to Molly and Max Barnett, his parents were first-generation Americans and his father worked as a “warehouse man and shipping clerk,” according to Barnett’s autobiography.
The Great Depression hit the family hard, and they struggled. In high school, Lou worked on a government student program for low-income people and made about $12 per week. His mother did piecemeal sewing work from home.
When it was time for college, Barnett was offered a half-year semester scholarship to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. However, because he wasn’t sure how he would pay for future tuition — or food, for that matter — he enrolled at Northeastern University in Boston. He augmented his Northeastern education by taking “as many chemistry courses around Boston as I could.” Ultimately, he graduated from Northeastern with a double degree in engineering and management.
Barnett was drafted into the National Guards of Massachusetts in October 1940. His time in the Army was short, as he developed an ulcer and was discharged. He began to contemplate a career in plastics.
In the early ’40s, he met the love of his life, Madlyn, of blessed memory.
“My cousin called me. He was dating Rowena Kimmel and he said, you’ve got to meet this girl [Madlyn], and that was it. We had a telephone romance and she came up to visit me. We had cats and dogs, and she got fleas, and then she asked me to marry her, so I did.”
They married on May 5, 1946. Theirs was a love affair that spanned 66 years and was filled with family, fun, hard work and philanthropy.
“It was great luck. We had a lot of mazel,” Barnett said. “God moves in mysterious ways; we had a hell of a ride.”
At the time, General Electric was the only plastic company in the Boston area. Initially, he wasn’t able to work in the plastics division because he hadn’t finished his degree yet. He took a job as an expediter for the division that made turbines and other power trains for ships and submarines.
Barnett would frequently visit the plastics group in building No. 75, hoping a job would open up. Finally, one did in the engineering group and laboratory. There, he learned how to run machine tools, lathes and milling machines, and also how to run a plastics press and to operate laminators.
The Barnetts moved to Fort Worth in 1946 to join Madlyn’s family there. They started their family, first Laurie, then Eliot, followed by Rhoda.
By 1952, Barnett’s sister Ruthie and husband Milton Hammil, and brother Stanley and wife Myra also had moved to Fort Worth — as did his parents.
Barnett started his business, Loma (for Louis and Madlyn), in 1948 with one rented model of a molding machine. His first order was for plastic fishing lures. In that first year, Loma’s profit was slightly over $1,000, according to Barnett’s autobiography. In 1962, the company was producing 157 plastics articles and using more than 1 million pounds of raw plastics each month.
By 1965, Loma had grown by leaps and bounds, and Barnett had many firsts to his credit. They were:
• Plastic roll-top bread box.
• Plastic wax paper and paper towel dispenser.
• Oval-shaped wastebasket.
• First wastebasket to incorporate “feet.”
• Wastebasket with decorative imprinting embossed on it.
• Plastic picnic basket including dinnerware and eating utensils.
• Plastic clothes hamper.
• The first polyethylene “boat-like” baby bath, followed by a complete line of stylized nursery accessories including the covered diaper pail.
• The first plastic outdoor trashcan.
Many members of the Fort Worth Jewish community worked at Loma, including the late Irv Levine, Barnett’s childhood friend from Malden, who became Loma president after Loma was sold to Standard Oil of Ohio in 1966. Milton Hamill, who was married to Barnett’s sister Ruthie, moved to Fort Worth and worked for the company. So did Barnett’s father and his brother Stanley.
Barnett attributed his success to those friends and family who supported him.
“You don’t do anything by yourself. The self-made man in my book is not in my vocabulary. People help you,” he said
Barnett reminisced about some of his favorite memories over the years.
“You look back, my God, I don’t know what happened,” when discussing how fast his life has gone by
He is known for a number of unique hobbies, and he talked about a few of them.

Cooking and Entertaining

Barnett explained how he became a gourmet cook and author of two cookbooks. It started out of necessity.
“When we got married, we moved to Boston. When Madlyn burnt water. I knew I was in trouble, so I started to cook. Grandma Brachman sent her to Fannie Farmer’s cooking school; it didn’t help. So, in order to survive, I had to start cooking.”
He has several favorite recipes, among them his sought-after salami.
“There’s one recipe that everyone in the family still makes that I never wrote down, and that was salami. You cut the salami in eighths. You dip it in soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce and mustard. Make an extra one, because they’ll eat ‘em up.”
His great-granddaughter, Mia, started eating them at age 2.
“It was easy and, Oh My God, if I made two they wanted four, and I used to serve them before a meal.”
As a New Englander, fish also was a mainstay.
“I also made a poached salmon and cucumber. To make good fish, leave it alone. Good fish in itself is excellent,” he advises.
There have been cooking mishaps from time to time. For one party, Barnett served peanut soup.
“Oh boy. I’ll never hear the end of that. I made some peanut soup, which was atrocious. We had a big crowd of people around. Everyone spilled it on the grass. And a few days later, the grass died.”
He and Madlyn loved to entertain their family and friends.
“We had a couple of hundred sometimes at a party around here. It was wild, and the kids came along and we had a ride with them….It goes by fast.”

Wine and cognac

It’s no secret that Barnett has always enjoyed wine and cognac. He partially attributes reaching 100 to the pair. He is a member of the distinguished Confrérie des Chevaliers du Tastevin, the order that has 12,000 Chevaliers worldwide.
He explained that he learned about wine while traveling to France on Loma business.
“I was in France an awful lot. I had a guy who must have been a German Jew, and he was in Paris and I would report to him as the Loma representative, and I got into the wines pretty quick.”
Barnett keeps a wine cellar in his home office. He likes to drink Pinot Noir. “It’s a good wine and goes with everything,” he said.
He also enjoys cognac.
“I like to drink cognac. I drink it with everything. I’ve drunk enough to float a battleship.”

Going to the Dogs

With his constant companion, yellow lab Casey, 10, at his side, Barnett explained he was always a dog lover, He developed a passion for raising, showing and judging them.
“I always had dogs. I took it as an escape hatch. It was wonderful to get away from the business, the family and the kids That was my real escape: judging dog shows all over the world.”
He also raised dogs both as pets and for show. “I’ve had some great ones,” he said.
His German Shorthaired Pointer Columbia Rivers Jeep was a six-time Best in Show champion.
The family’s first pet was a German Shepherd named Prince Rex King.
“We went to Leon [Madlyn’s brother] and Faye’s, and my daughter Laurie was afraid of dogs. I said, ‘Oh my God, I’m not going to have a kid who’s afraid of dogs.’ Madlyn was not too keen on dogs. Our next-door neighbor had German Shepherds. He got me a German Shepherd pup. I take the pup and ring the doorbell of my house, and Madlyn comes to the door, and I shoved it into her arms and said, ‘How can you be afraid of a little piece of fur like this?’ Laurie named the dog Prince Rex King, who grew into the biggest Shepherd the Barnetts ever had.

Travel

The Barnetts loved to travel, and Lou traveled the world both for business and pleasure.
Among his favorite places to travel were Italy, Acapulco and Israel.
“I love Italy. Spent a lot of time there. Acapulco. Spent a lot of time down there. That was our escape. Acapulco was wonderful in those days.” The Barnetts took active vacations.
“I fished Mexico quite a bit,” he said
Everyone got into the fishing act, especially son Eliot and Madlyn, who caught a huge sail fish in Acapulco.
“We were goers. We didn’t sit. I have a doll from every place we went.”
Often, the Barnetts visited synagogues when they traveled.
“I visited a synagogue in Aruba. It had a sand floor.” He noted that every Jewish community he ever visited had one thing in common. “A Love of God — that’s the concept of all of them. Like Maimonides said ‘If I’m not for me, then who is for me, and if not now, when?’”
Perhaps the place has loved the most is Israel, where he and Madlyn first visited in 1961. Madlyn, like her mother, Ella Brachman, before her, and her children after her, had a passion for Hadassah.
“I’ve been in Israel maybe 50 times. I had a love affair with the country and the people. I set up many clients. Some are still going. There was a Formica-type plant in Israel that I helped start.” Barnett became involved in Israel’s plastics industry, consulting, educating and advising.
During his travels to Israel, Barnett met some of the country’s early leaders.
“Hell, I knew them all. From Golda Meir. She loved to smoke cigarettes. Chain smoked.
“She was quite a lady, oh boy. She was smart and she was decisive. She was probably the best ‘man’ Israel ever produced.”
Others he met and spent time with were David Ben Gurion, Yitzhak Rabin, Levi Eshkol and Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek.
“Teddy Kollek used to come up to my suite and take a nap. Teddy was a real force,” Barnett said.
In his memoir, Barnett said he probably has spent more than two years of his life in Israel. He loved to walk Jerusalem and was known for walking around the pool of the King David Hotel every morning while he read the Jerusalem Post.
One of his favorite hangouts was a restaurant and bar called Finks.
“They made goulash. It wasn’t too kosher, but it was delicious,” he said.
Barnett said he was proud to have been able to support Madlyn and now his daughters, Laurie and Rhoda, in their passion of Hadassah. The family not only volunteers their time for the organization, but also supports the hospital financially.

Philanthropy

Barnett has been extremely philanthropic, especially to Hadassah and Northeastern University. His philanthropy seems to always be innovative and have far-reaching effects.
He and Madlyn supported Hadassah in many ways, most recently through the Madlyn Barnett Healing Garden in the Sarah Wetsman Davidson Tower at Ein Kerem in Jerusalem. One of the first many years ago was the Ella Brachman Rehabilitation Garden at Mount Scopus campus, also in Jerusalem.
The Barnett institute of Chemical and Biological Analysis at Northeastern University was founded in 1973. “Today, with over 50 scientists and a $8 million endowment, the Institute is recognized internationally as one of the premier centers for cutting-edge research and advanced training in analytical chemistry for biomedical applications,” the Institute’s website states. “The Barnett Institute’s close ties to the Boston medical industrial communities, along with an active program of spin-outs and licensing technology, provides for many ‘real life’ applications of research advances which have led to more than 1000 published papers and 75 patents.”
Barnett is proud of the Institute’s accomplishments. “We have graduates, docs and post docs in 39 countries. We do a lot of work with genomes and have uncovered some interesting bio markers that are being used all over the world in marking the defect of a gene.”
Children, Grandchildren and Great-Grandchildren
Barnett’s greatest joys are his children, Laurie and Lon Werner, Sheryl and Eliot Barnett, and Rhoda and Howard Bernstein. “It’s been a wild ride,” he says. The family has Shabbat dinner most Friday nights with his children, their spouses and niece Debby Rice. It’s dinner and “Wheel of Fortune,” followed by a cigar (preferably an Hoyo de Monterrey) for Barnett.
He has a very special relationship with his six grandchildren: Jeffrey and Jason Werner, Matthew and Emily Bernstein, and Nathan and Jessica Barnett
He loved to be silly with his grandkids, and they loved him for it. One favorite tradition was “Downtown.”
For Downtown, he would pick up the grandchildren.
“We’d play Petula Clark’s “Downtown” and go to the Fort Worth Club. We used to steal some bread from the Fort Worth Club, wrap it in a napkin and go to the part and feed the ducks. They would come, and the kids would go crazy.”
His advice to grandparents everywhere:
“You have to go to them. You have to be with them, raise them and do silly things with them.”
Today, his family has grown further and his heart has grown fuller. Grandson Matthew Bernstein married Natalie, and they have a daughter, Maddison. Grandson Jason Werner is married to Jessica, and they have two children, Mia and Blake.
Barnett’s face lights up at the mention of his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. “The fact that all the kids are coming in is a blessing,” he said. “They’re coming here for my birthday, so I can spoil them a little bit.”

Awards, Honors and Organizations

Barnett has been feted numerous times. With his wife, he received the Prime Minister’s Medallion for dedicated effort on Israel’s behalf, and the B’nai B’rith Gold Medallion for Humanitarianism. He was named Jewish Man of the Year by the Isadore Garsek Lodge of B’nai B’rith.
Texas Christian University has awarded him an honorary doctor of science, and Northeastern awarded him an honorary doctor of engineering. He is a past president of the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Congregation Ahavath Sholom, where he celebrated his second bar mitzvah at age 83.
He has served on numerous boards within the Jewish community and the community at-large on local, national and international levels.

What’s the Secret to a Great Life?

When asked what the secret is to a great life like his he replied,
“The word is LIVE a great life. Do things. Don’t sit on your butts and wait for them to come to you. Just go out there and do as best you can. No matter how much money you have or whatever, go out there and do something. We all can to the extent of our capabilities, so why not do it instead of letting someone else do it? Do it yourself.”
His thoughts about being 100? “It’s old,” attributing his milestone to “great luck, mazel and genes.”
He added, “If you’re lucky, you get there; if you’re not lucky, you don’t get there. It’s a relative term. It’s a measurement of what? Your Life? OK…Would I do it over again? You bet. Why change what ain’t broke?”

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Jews were leaders in photography movement

Posted on 19 December 2018 by admin

I cannot help but smile when I see people taking “selfies” with their phones.
I guess that I am somewhat old-fashioned, but I associate “photography” with cameras and not with cell phones. If you want to think of your cellphone as a camera, be my guest. Who am I to argue?
Obviously, we have come a long way in the history of photography. My belief is that most people do not know that Jews have been a significant force in the field of photography.
One of the earliest Jewish contributors was Levi ben Gershom, who, in the early 1300s, used a camera-like box to temporarily capture and observe images and eclipses of the sun. It wasn’t an actual camera, but you have to start somewhere.
Two years after the Daguerreotype was first developed in 1839, Herman Biouw, a Jewish artist, became famous for portraits of royalty as well as the earliest news photographs, of the Great Fire of Hamburg. Other of Biouw’s historic photos were the first Jewish family portrait (the Hahn family of Berlin) and the first portrait taken of a rabbi, Rabbi Samuel Hirsh of Hamburg.
Biouw’s achievement’s included making prints from copper plates, gold-toning and hand-coloring of prints. Tragically, he died as a result of inhaling the fumes of the processing chemicals.
Around the same time period in Melbourne, 1842, George Goodman pioneered photography in Australia, opening that nation’s first portrait studio.
As interest in photography grew in Australia, Jabez Small opened studios in Melbourne and Sidney and, eventually, a chain of camera shops that his son extended to every major city in the country.
In the 1840s, father and son David and Solomon Nunes Carvalho brought studio photography to Charleston, South Carolina. They eventually founded a photographic shop in Los Angeles as well as the city’s first Hebrew School.
Other Jewish photographic pioneers included Friedrich Lessman, Mendel Diness (first Jewish photographer in Jerusalem) and Michael Greim (1860).
In addition to portraiture, Jewish photographers documented life around them. They were sensitive to the issues facing other Jews like themselves. Photographers, especially Jewish ones, knew Jewish folkways, likes and dislikes.
Jewish photographers had the opportunity to capture old, traditional folkways, some of which were changing and disappearing. One cause of picture postcards becoming so popular was this very reason.
In addition to its growing commercial success, photography was also gaining acceptance and expanding as an art form. Jews and others found it easy to join with other artists and groups to learn and expand in this relatively new area of expression.
One example of how Jewish photo-artists developed and flourished is that of Andre Friedman, known to the world as Robert Capa. Born in Budapest, he left for Berlin at age 18, escaped to France as Hitler gained power and became world famous with his photo coverage of the Spanish Civil War.
Who could forget Capa’s photo of a soldier falling backward at the moment of being struck on the battlefield?
You may recognize the name of Margaret Bourke-White, in reality Margaret Bourke-Weiss, a Life magazine photographer whose grandparents were Orthodox Jews from Poland.
Alfred Stieglitz left his family’s printing business, becoming one of the first great art photographers of street scenes, portraits and nature.
The most famous images of World War II were captured by Jewish photographers such as Capa, Walter Rosenblum, Martin Lederhandler and Louis Weintraub.
AP photographer Joe Rosenthal captured the famous Iwo Jima flag-raising image, probably the most memorable photo of World War II.
Life magazine was considered the prime publication for creative photographers. Look magazine, another pictorial magazine, achieved success under Arthur Rothstein, its director of photography, and its creative artist, Ben Shahn.
And if you are not convinced by now that Jews played a significant role in the history of photography, I need only remind you of that famous Life magazine cover photo of the V-J Day Times Square celebration showing the sailor kissing the nurse.
The famous image was captured by Life photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt, a German-born Jew.

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Fairness a good lesson as Christmas nears

Posted on 19 December 2018 by admin

Dear Families,
As we get close to Christmas and some children (and adults) still wish for all the fun and, especially, the great music, I thought it might be good to talk about fairness.
Kids always tell their parents, “That’s not fair!” What exactly are they thinking? What is “fair”? Fairness is a word that is really about justice (mishpat in Hebrew), and justice may be an even harder word for kids and for us.
Judaism has the message of justice deeply implanted in the spirit of Jewish life. The Torah and the Prophets are filled with laws and examples of how to make a fair judgment and the importance of being fair and just.
“You shall not render an unfair decision: Do not favor the poor nor show deference to the rich; judge your neighbor fairly.” (Leviticus 19:15)
“Only to do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with your God.” (Micah 6:8)
Rabbi Hillel said, “Do not do to others what you do not want them to do to you.” This is a very easy way to understand how to treat others. However, being fair isn’t always easy or simple. Fair doesn’t always mean the same.
Here are some good questions to talk about and a great discussion-starter story:
• Have you ever been treated unfairly? How did it make you feel?
• Do you think it is fair that older children get to stay up later and do more things than younger children? Why or why not? Do you think it is fair that boys get to do things that girls don’t get to do? Why or why not?
• Some families have a rule that if there is a piece of cake to share, one person gets to cut it and the other gets to choose the first piece. How is this a fair way to divide the cake? Can this system be used in other areas?
Here’s a story for discussion:
A young boy came to a woman’s house and asked if she would like to buy some of the berries he had picked from his father’s fields. The woman said, “Yes, I would, and I’ll just take your basket inside to measure out 2 quarts.”
The boy sat down on the porch and the woman asked, “Don’t you want to watch me? How do you know that I won’t cheat you and take more than 2 quarts?” The young boy said, “I am not afraid, for you would get the worst of the deal.” “How could that be?” she asked. The boy answered, “If you take more than 2 quarts that you are paying me for, I would only lose the berries. You would make yourself a liar and a thief.”
Talk about the meaning of this story with your family.
We should always try to do the fair and just thing. It is an important value to live by.

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