Archive | October, 2019

The Democratic debate revealed the candidates’ differences on Middle East policy

The Democratic debate revealed the candidates’ differences on Middle East policy

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

A record 12 Democratic presidential candidates stand before the start of their debate at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, Oct. 15, 2019. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

By Ron Kampeas

WESTERVILLE, Ohio (JTA) — The fourth Democratic presidential debate revealed fissures among the candidates on whether to keep U.S. troops in the Middle East.

The 12 hopefuls on the stage Tuesday night at Otterbein University in this Columbus suburb were unanimous in describing President Donald Trump’s pullout of American troops from Syria as catastrophic for the Kurds, U.S. allies in the war against the Islamic State who are now at the mercy of Turkish forces who invaded northern Syria following the American departure. But they differed over whether U.S. forces should remain in the region.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, a veteran who in the past has sounded conciliatory toward the Syrian regime, blamed the carnage on “the regime-change war that we’ve been waging in Syria” and said the United States had backed terrorists in the country.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who is emerging as a front-runner in the race, agreed with Gabbard “that we ought to get out of the Middle East. I don’t think we should have troops in the Middle East.”

Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who is also a veteran, lashed out at Gabbard.

“The slaughter going on in Syria is not a consequence of American presence,” he said. “It’s a consequence of a withdrawal and a betrayal by this president of American allies and American values.”

Gabbard shot back: “So, really, what you’re saying, Mayor Pete, is that you would continue to support having U.S. troops in Syria for an indefinite period of time to continue this regime-change war that has caused so many refugees to flee Syria.”

“You can put an end to endless war without embracing Donald Trump’s policy, as you’re doing,” Buttgieg countered.

Also upholding the U.S. troop presence in northern Syria were former Vice President Joe Biden and Sens. Bernie Sanders, Amy Klobuchar, Kamala Harris and Cory Booker, along with former Housing Secretary Julian Castro.

“The crisis here, as I think Joe said and Pete said, is when you begin to betray people, in terms of the Kurds, 11,000 of them died fighting ISIS, 30,000 were wounded, and the United States said, ‘We’re with you, we’re standing with you,’” said Sanders, I-Vt., who before Warren’s surge was the flag-bearer for progressives and a critic of U.S. involvement in foreign wars.

“And then suddenly, one day after a phone call with [Turkish President Recep Tayyip] Erdogan, announced by tweet, Trump reverses that policy. Now you tell me what country in the world will trust the word of the president of the United States?”

Klobuchar, of Minnesota, was the only candidate to note the impact on Israel of the rupture of the U.S. alliance with the Kurds.

“Think about our other allies, Israel,” she said. “How do they feel right now? Donald Trump is not true to his word when they are a beacon of democracy in the Mideast.”

Klobuchar and Castro also faulted Trump for pulling out of the Iran nuclear deal last year, saying it diminished U.S. influence abroad. The deal, which traded sanctions relief for a rollback of Iran’s nuclear program, was stridently opposed by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Trump wants to negotiate a more stringent deal with Iran and has reimposed tough sanctions on the country.

Sanders, 78, addressed concerns about his health arising after his recent heart attack.

“Let me invite you all to a major rally we’re having in Queens, New York,” he said. “We’re going to have a special guest at that event. And we are going to be mounting a vigorous campaign all over this country. That is how I think I can reassure the American people.”

Toward the end of the debate, news broke that the special guest was Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the freshman congresswoman from New York who has become a leading progressive voice and is going to endorse Sanders for president. Ocasio-Cortez worked as an organizer for Sanders’ 2016 run.

Also endorsing Sanders were two other members of “The Squad” of freshman Democrats: Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. Their support was notable as Warren surpassed Sanders in polling over the summer to become the leading progressive alternative to Biden. Recent polling is showing Warren pulling ahead of Biden as well to become the leading candidate overall.

Omar and Tlaib both back the boycott Israel movement and have been faulted for remarks seen as crossing the line into anti-Semitism. Sanders does not support a boycott of Israel, but upholds the right of other Americans to do so.

The fourth member of The Squad, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, is the closest of the four to the pro-Israel community and has not yet endorsed Sanders.

Much of the first hour of the debate featured candidates targeting Warren, a consequence of her new front-runner status. Warren was criticized for not explaining how she would fund her “Medicare for All” initiative.

As in the previous debates, candidates charged that Trump’s blunt nationalism was fueling bigotry and right-wing violence. Harris, of California, lashed out at Warren for not endorsing her call for Twitter to suspend the president’s account.

“I would urge you to join me,” Harris said to Warren. “We saw in El Paso that that shooter in his manifesto was informed by how Donald Trump uses that platform, and this is a matter of corporate responsibility. Twitter should be held accountable and shut down that site.”

Warren avoided taking up the challenge, saying she preferred to use antitrust laws to break up tech monopolies.

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Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation to honor Dr. Michael Weisberg

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation to honor Dr. Michael Weisberg

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

Dr. Michael Weisberg

The North Texas/ Oklahoma Chapter of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation will honor Dr. Michael F. Weisberg at its Eighth Annual Dinner: A Night of Champions, 6:30-10 p.m., Friday, Nov. 8, at The Statler Dallas.
Dr. Weisberg is being recognized for his compassion and dedication to improving the quality of life for hundreds of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients for more than 30 years. He will receive the 2019 Physician of the Year Award.
Michael Weisberg is a gastroenterologist and a founding member of Digestive Health Associates of Texas. He has been recognized as a ‘Super-Doctor’ by Texas Monthly and voted to D Magazine’s list of best doctors multiple times. Weisberg has written two medical thrillers, “The Hospitalist” and “In The End.” He is currently working on a historical fiction screenplay. In 2016, Dr. Weisberg gave a TEDxTALK titled “How the Art of Medicine Became a Business in the 21st Century.”
Weisberg has been actively involved with the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation for more than 15 years through his service on the North Texas Chapter Medical Advisory Committee. He has participated in multiple fundraising programs, including founding the Chapter’s Annual Dinner and the Parents’ Chat program with his wife Sheryl. His personal contributions and history of service have helped accelerate The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s vision of a future free from IBD and have made a lasting improvement in patients’ lives.
The evening will include a cocktail reception, live auction, dinner, champions’ award ceremony and more at the modern Statler Hotel in downtown Dallas.
Please visit https://bit.ly/35v5klU to purchase tickets starting at $250 per person. For more information contact the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation at 972-386-0607 or jleech@crohnscolitisfoundation.org.

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Tycher Community Read set for Oct. 28

Tycher Community Read set for Oct. 28

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

Photo: Galen Evans
“‘In Another Time’ is my idea of what the rise of the Nazis looked like in that moment – how many didn’t know what was happening and what day-to-day lives were like,” said author Jillian Cantor. The author will be featured Oct. 28 at the Tycher Library Community Read, part of the 2019/2020 Aaron Family JCC Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Dallas Jewish BookFest.

This year’s book, ‘In Another Time,’ engaging and thrilling

By Deb Silverthorn
Time machines may not be real, and time not always linear, but it’s the gaps in between Jillian Cantor’s “In Another Time” that offer a spinning story. Beginning at 7 p.m., Monday, Oct. 28, at the Aaron Family JCC’s Zale Auditorium, Cantor will introduce her book at the Tycher Library Community Read, part of the 2019/2020 Aaron Family JCC’s Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Dallas Jewish BookFest.
“‘In Another Time’ is my idea of what the rise of the Nazis looked like in that moment — how many didn’t know what was happening and what day-to-day lives were like,” said Cantor, author of “Margot,” “The Hours Count” and “The Lost Letter.” This 2019 publication is a transporting love story, unfolding through decades and across continents, in alternating viewpoints.
In 1931 Germany, bookshop owner Max Beissinger meets Hanna Ginsberg, a budding concert violinist. As their love affair unfolds, the climate drastically changes as Hitler comes to power. Following Max in the years leading to WWII, and Hanna the decade after, “In Another Time” is a story of love and loss, passion and music and a family secret that may provide survival.
“I have loved Cantor’s work. She creates well-crafted page-turners and I’m looking forward to this,” said Linda Blasnik, a Tycher librarian for 10 years. “She creates a fantasy element, that is really thrilling.”
The author, who credits her fourth grade teacher for weekly assignments that introduced her to writing, enjoys Skyping and in-person discussions.
“I enjoy writing what I like reading,” said Cantor, a Philadelphia native, now living in Arizona with her family. “Music has always been a part of my life. Hanna’s character came to me while I was at the symphony during 2016’s election season. I listened, and thought, ‘no matter what happens, we’ll have beautiful music.’”
Rabbi Mordechai Harris, executive director of the Center for Jewish Education (CJE) & Rabbi in Residence at the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, will open the program co-sponsored by the CJE with support of the Jewish Book Council which is free and open to the public.
“This book is poignant and has such poetic flair. It’s beautiful. We’re happy to have Jillian here in person,” said CJE Coordinator of Projects and Administration, Karen Schlosberg. “The book is meaningful and her personal notes, of why she wrote it — that we can never forget our history — resonates.”
The Tycher Library, on the JCC’s third floor, houses 7,000-plus books, periodicals and more than 700 DVDs. In 1981, brothers Fred and Martin Tycher, of blessed memory, dedicated the library honoring their parents. The Tycher Library now pays tribute to the whole family’s dream to inspire Jewish learning through literature.
Texas Jewish Post contributor Harriet Gross helped launch the Community Read in 2006 after being inspired by citywide programs in Chicago and here in Richardson. Thirteen years later, the event is a go-to.
“The idea of a community reading and discussing one book was stimulating, to spark participation by asking groups to do something together with the book,” said Gross, who first shared it with then-librarian Joan Gremont. “Our first was ‘The Book Thief.’ Then, and ever since, we’ve shared good discussions and meaningful events and as the great ‘they’ say, the rest is history.”
Dallas’ Andrea Peskind Katz, reviewer of GreatThoughts.com and behind the Great Thoughts Great Readers Facebook book salon, with nearly 5000 readers and authors, is thanked by Cantor in her book’s acknowledgements. Katz says, “this is Jillian’s best, she’s a great speaker and ‘In Another Time’ is an on-target choice for the Community Read.”
The Tycher Community Read, and its Spring Read “Gateway to the Moon,” March 5, join this year’s BookFest schedule that includes themes of cooking, historical fiction, business entrepreneurship and fantasy.
For details, or to RSVP for “In Another Time” (by Oct. 23), visit jewishdallas.org/fallread. For overall BookFest details visit jccdallas.org/special-events/bookfest.

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On the Road with Marvin Beleck

On the Road with Marvin Beleck

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

Photo: Courtesy of Marvin Beleck
Marvin Beleck, at the opening reception of “Bits and Pieces: A Celebration of Judaica,” at Shalom Austin’s J Gallery. He is standing next to his very first mosaic, which he made in the eighth grade.

By Sharon Wisch-Ray
As the High Holidays approached, Marvin Beleck headed to Austin Sept. 18 for the opening reception of Bits and Pieces: A Celebration of Judaica,” at Shalom Austin’s J Gallery. The exhibit will run through Oct. 28. In addition to Marvin’s art, the work of Ginette Jordan, Susan Ribnick and Martha Kull is being showcased.
Nineteen of Marvin’s mosaics are on display, including his first one which he made in the eighth-grade.
Marvin was born and raised in Tyler. Following the Navy and college he made his home in Fort Worth along with his wife Ava.
Marvin’s original one of a kind designs are inspired by symbols and images that are meaningful to Judaism. His unique method of creating his art includes his use of various colors and textures in a variety of materials and tiles to execute his vision. Production of these rich mosaics involves a process of selecting a theme, laying it out on a plywood board and meticulously hand-cutting appropriate materials for each piece which is individually permanently glued in place on the board.
In addition to this artistic passion and hobby, Beleck has accumulated a vast collection of stamps featuring Jewish people and themes, which he published in 2017 in a book entitled “Noted Jewish People of the World on Stamps.”

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The road to happiness is a choice to make

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

Dear Families,
I am sure I have shared my secret about the holidays — I bring a book to synagogue! Every year I look through what I have and check out something new and inspiring. This year I choose a book that I have wanted to read even though it isn’t new: “The Happiness Prayer” by Rabbi Evan Moffic. There is so much today about looking for happiness and we often question if that is a worthwhile endeavor — there is so much more to the meaning of life! As I perused the book, this spoke to me: The modern English word happiness comes from the Middle English, hap, as in happenstance and haphazard. The origin suggests that a happy life is a result of randomness and luck. The Hebrew word for happiness — simcha — demands intention. It comes from an intentional pursuit of joy amid community. That difference suggests that finding happiness is a choice. It is a choice available to all of us. Happiness is not a destination. It is the path itself.
That sets Jewish happiness apart! Now Rabbi Moffic shares a prayer that is said every morning as part of morning prayers. Here is Rabbi Moffic’s paraphrasing of Eilu Devarim:
Honor those who gave you life.
Be kind.
Keep learning.
Invite others into your life.
Be there when others need you.
Celebrate good times.
Support yourself and others during times of loss.
Pray with intention.
Forgive.
Look inside and commit.
Then each chapter touches on each of the 10 “things.” Focusing on these will make you happy if we start each day remembering them. You can find this in your prayer book or use Rabbi Moffic’s words and there is even a song by Susan Colin “Things Without End” that may work for you. My advice is to read the book and at the end, each chapter has five questions for you to think about. However, we can begin without the book (some of you don’t have to buy every book that looks good although I struggle to say no to a book). Choose one for the day or week and be intentional about it!
Laura Seymour is director of Camping Services at the Aaron Family Jewish Community Center in Dallas.

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America’s Jewish farmers helped agricultural expansion

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

Many people are unaware of the fact that Jewish immigrants were part of the great agricultural expansion which took place in the United States from 1800 to 1900 and beyond.
The usual belief is that Jews were merchants, generally found in towns and cities and not farmers out in the countryside, tilling the soil.
Not quite so. Fleeing the disastrous pogroms and lack of economic opportunities under the czar, Eastern Europeans especially those with farming skills, found agricultural opportunities easily available.
A number of Jewish organizations such as the Hebrew Union Agricultural Society, the Jewish Colonization Society, and the American Hebrew and Horticultural Association attempted to promote and assist Jewish settlers to organize groups (collectives).
They would be trained, then formed into groups which would share the work and any profits thus derived.
The Jewish agricultural collectives which were established in 12 states eventually failed to last very long because the immigrants did not want to share their profits with their fellow workers, some of whom they felt may not have worked as hard as they.
With the eventual failure of collectives, the Association began to fund individual farmers instead of groups.
Many Eastern European Jews fleeing the hopelessness of bleak futures under the czar’s repressive measures against Jews, found work as farm laborers.
My father, of blessed memory, escaping as a teenager from being swept up in Eastern Europe’s pre-WW1 gathering storm, fled to America in 1914.
Joining his older brother, who was working on a chicken farm in New Jersey, he learned to work with chickens, eventually opening his own market in New York.
I remember during World War II when meat was scarce and rationed, that we always had meat on the table, chicken, that is.
Farming, in general, was changing during and after World War II. Smaller farms were disappearing, being bought out by large co-ops and corporations.
Modern farming now required lots of land and a highly mechanized and modernized approach.
While the number of Jewish farms has greatly decreased, there have been some recent developments.
Coinciding with the growing interest in organic foods, there is the environmental health movement. Organic farms are increasing and some have become large corporations, such as Ben and Jerry’s.
The Jewish Farm School centered in Philadelphia has been operating for nearly 14 years, but is scheduled to shut down as an organization this fall.
Yet, as one Jewish agricultural group fades, others, like newly planted seeds, pop up. Idealistic young Jews have helped to form farms, co-ops, and organizations in order to teach and incorporate Jewish values into food production.
Some of the groups which impose a higher standard during food production include Adamah, EcoGlatt, Grow and Behold, Hazon, Jewish Farm School and others.
Yet, as one Jewish Farm group, in Philadelphia, appears to be fading, another in Baltimore appears to be emerging.
For any TJP readers contemplating becoming a Jewish farmer, you may be interested in attending Cultivating Culture, the First Annual Gathering of Jewish Farmers, to be held at the Pearlstone Center near Baltimore, Maryland Feb. 13-16, 2020.

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Why we study Torah again and again

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

This week’s Torah portion is a special Torah portion specifically for Hol HaMoed Sukkot — the intermediate days of Sukkot and we will soon be celebrating Simchat Torah. Now, when I am teaching Torah, I like to begin with asking the question of why we study Torah again and again and again, year after year after year. The answer, I assert, is that God is trying to speak to us through the text. Was it written word for word on Mount Sinai, dictated by God to Moses? Or did multiple authors write it, authors that we label J, E, P and D? I don’t know, I can’t tell you. But I do believe that whatever our Holy Scripture’s origins, God is trying to speak to us through the text and that’s why we continue to study it over and over and over. If God is speaking, we say, then we’re going to try to listen. As I read the text, suddenly it appeared, as if it were a diamond suddenly dusted off, catching the light, and glittering with a fiery sparkle. It felt like God was speaking to me out of the text. “See, see!” it said to me, “Moses tried to know Me too!”
Why would it be so hard for Moses to know God? Moses spoke to God peh el peh, mouth to mouth. Surely he knew God deeply and intimately, in exactly the way that we desire to know God. Yet Moses must ask, “let me know your ways, that I may know You and continue in Your favor.” And Psalms 103:7-13 tells us that God did grant Moses’ request:
“He made known His ways to Moses, His deeds to the children of Israel.
“The Eternal is compassionate and gracious, slow to anger, abounding in steadfast love.
“He will not contend forever, or nurse His anger for all time.
“He has not dealt with us according to our sins, nor has He requited us according to our iniquities.
“For as the heavens are high above the earth so great is His steadfast love toward those who fear Him.
“As east is far from west, so far has He removed our sins from us.
“As a father has compassion for his children, so the Eternal has compassion for those who fear Him.”
What are God’s ways? God loves us, forgives us, and has compassion upon us. But Moses wants to know God even more intimately, more fully, more completely: “Oh, let me behold Your Presence!” Yet God denies this request saying, “you cannot see My face, for man may not see Me and live.” We cannot know God as thoroughly as we want for we are merely mortal. We cannot know God fully and live. But God loves us and promises: “I will go in the lead and lighten your burden.” Perhaps we cannot know God fully. Perhaps we will never understand God to our satisfaction, but we can take comfort knowing that God loves us, will lead us, and will comfort us when our burdens are heavy.
Rabbi Ben Sternman is the spiritual leader of Adat Chaverim in Plano.

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Memories of High Holidays from long ago

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

For me, the best thing about our High Holiday season is memories: the ones we treasure from long-ago times, and the new ones we create. Here are some of mine:
When I was a high-schooler, my mother and I would walk together every year for Kol Nidre. (Dad wasn’t a shul-goer; his own memories of knuckle-cracking teachers when he was a boy in cheder left him with a permanent avoidance of rabbis.) Mom had an interesting habit: saving all the Shanah Tovahs she had written, addressed, and stamped before Rosh Hashanah and during the 10 days after, take the pile with her on Erev Yom Kippur, and drop them into the mailbox at the end of our street. “It’s still the New Year,” she would always say. Nearing home on our way back, we would pass the adjoining houses of my father’s sisters and their families, who were as non-observant as he. They’d be sitting on their front porches, waiting and would stand as we passed by to ask us if we wanted to come in for a cup of coffee! Hospitality, irony, or pure ignorance — I’ve never been sure.
The idea of fasting was carried to extremes in our shul, where a heavy block of wood covered every sink in the building, making it impossible for anyone even to attempt drinking water on the premises throughout Yom Kippur. This is something I’ve never heard of since.
Before the Day of Atonement were the “Days of Ostentation”: the first two of the New Year were always fashion shows! All the women had new dresses and hats; children had been fitted for new shoes at the start of the school year but weren’t allowed to wear them until the holidays. I guess I should capitalize, because The Holidays were of capital importance to us as high-schoolers for other reasons than religious observance: As teenagers, we also dressed up. Since we weren’t tethered to our seats as we had pretty much been when we were younger, we often left the shul’s interior to mingle outside with our friends, and since there were many shuls within easy walking distance, we would even use this “timeout” for a leisurely stroll, enjoying meet-ups with similar “escapees” who worshiped elsewhere.
In later years, in other places, when I had children of my own, I was one of those who remained rooted in my seat until the end of every service, which meant I depended on the kindness of others to have an after-the-fast meal ready when the last shofar blast declared that Yom Kippur was over. There was always a friend who was relieved — actually delighted! — to be able to escape early and have orange juice, coffee, and food already on the table when I appeared. A favorite break-fast meal featured blintzes lovingly made in advance, then frozen, and finally defrosted when my domestic friends left services in time to go home for the final frying.
A true confession here, which I’m sure will not surprise those of you who know me: I have never made blintzes in my life! I have opened packages, fried up their contents and found them delicious, but having long watched the kitchen construction work done by mother, I knew early on that I was never going to spend my own time putting them together from the proverbial “scratch.” But I was truly blessed with friends who doubly enjoyed this work: first, making the blintzes; then, having them as an excuse for shortening their shul day! And — truth told — I’ve never been able to tell the difference between the homemade and the “manufactured” ones; I just enjoy them both.
This year’s happy addition to my holiday memory bank: about a dozen little kids on the bima, coaxing squeaky sounds out of their plastic shofarot, then after losing breath, looking raptly and with longing at our Baal Tokia as his powerful blast ushered us all into the New Year!

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JNF hosts Nimrod Ron exhibition

JNF hosts Nimrod Ron exhibition

Posted on 11 October 2019 by admin

Nearly 200 art enthusiast and Israel supporters gathered at the Laura Rathe Fine Art Gallery on Sept. 26 to see a special exhibition of the work of Israeli artist and entrepreneur Nimrod Ron. The event was conceptualized by Dallas philanthropist Elaine Pearlman, who, along with her husband Trevor, is a close and personal friend of Nimrod’s.
Nimrod served four years in the elite Shaldag unit of the Israel Defense Forces. He earned a JD and an MBA from Hebrew University. At the age of 29, he is already a successful high-tech entrepreneur and was named as one of Forbes Magazine’s “30 under 30.” His amazing talent earned him the honor of having his work displayed in the Dallas Museum of Biblical Art, alongside works from Andy Warhol.
“Thank you so much to Elaine and Trevor for making my dreams come true and making tonight a reality,” said Nimrod. “I decided to partner tonight with Jewish National Fund because I have seen firsthand the work that they are doing to continue Herzl’s dream in Israel. Everything they do is integral to a vision of building and connecting to the land of Israel.”
One of the works of art that was displayed and sold at the event was inspired by the relationship Nimrod developed with JNF, called Zionism 2.0, of Theodor Herzl painting a tree according to JNF’s vision. While the roots are darker in order to represent the initial struggle of the Jewish people, the rich color pallet represents the diversity and richness of Israeli culture, and its evolution into a vibrant nation. This piece, along with the others on display, sold at the event and 10% of all sales were donated to Jewish National Fund.

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Gabe Kapler’s firing by Phillies the latest blow for Jewish baseball players and managers at start of new year

Gabe Kapler’s firing by Phillies the latest blow for Jewish baseball players and managers at start of new year

Posted on 11 October 2019 by Sharon Wisch-Ray

By Marc Brodsky

(JTA) — 5780 has gotten off to, shall we say, a rocky start for Jewish baseball players and managers.
Two major league managers have lost their jobs in the Jewish New Year. Brad Ausmus, once the manager of Israel’s national team, is out after just one season leading the Los Angeles Angeles. On Thursday, Gabe Kapler was let go by the underperforming Philadelphia Phillies after two seasons. (At least they waited until after Yom Kippur.)
Players in the postseason fared no better.
Max Fried of the Atlanta Braves and Joc Pederson of the Los Angeles Dodgers chose to suit up on Yom Kippur (guess the latter learned nothing from Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax) and both lost their playoff series in deciding Game 5’s.
Fried came on in relief Wednesday amid a first-inning barrage by the St. Louis Cardinals but could not stem the tide as the National League’s Central Division champion scored 10 runs on the way to a 13-1 victory.
In a game that started about an hour and a half before the Jewish Day of Atonement ended, Pederson smacked a first-inning double and scored on a Max Muncy home run in the first inning against the Washington Nationals. The N.L.’s Western Division winners led 3-0 in the seventh, but the Nats rallied to tie it in the eighth inning and won 7-3 on a Howie Kendrick grand slam in the 10th.
The Cardinals and Nationals will meet in the N.L. Championship Series for the right to move on to the World Series.

Alex Bregman #2 of the Houston Astros still has a shot at this year’s World Series as he and the Astros take on the New York Yankees in the ALCS which begins Saturday Night in Houtson. Here Bregman throws the ball during the fourth inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers in game seven of the 2017 World Series at Dodger Stadium on November 1, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)


Alex Bregman still has a shot to get there with his Houston Astros. The star third baseman played on Yom Kippur eve, but the American League’s Western Division club lost to the host Tampa Bay Rays, who evened the best-of-5 series at 2-2.
Their deciding game is Thursday night — when there is no Jewish holiday.

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