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Around the Town: Annual meeting, award, caricatures

Around the Town: Annual meeting, award, caricatures

Posted on 18 May 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Federation annual meeting to feature national board chair

The Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County will convene its 81st annual meeting at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 25, at Beth-El Congregation. Richard Sandler, chair of the board of trustees of the Jewish Federations of North America, will be the featured guest speaker.
JFNA brings together 148 Federations and 300 Network Communities to maximize impact as the central address of North American Jewry. Ranked among the top 10 charities in the world, JFNA collectively raises over $900 million through the Annual Campaign each year and distributes over $2 billion from foundations and endowments.
Sandler is the past chair of the board of the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles. Joining Sandler will be JFNA National Campaign Chair and Fort Worth native Harold Gernsbacher.
Federation President Lon Werner will present the “State of the Federation.” JFS Chair Alden Karotkin will provide an update on JFS’ services. Other items on the agenda include: honoring board members completing their terms; election of the 2017-2018 board of directors and officers; and election of the 2017-2018 Jewish Family Services Committee. A dessert reception will follow the meeting.

Newest recipient of the Sylvia and Jerry Wolens Award

The announcement of this year’s Sylvia and Jerry Wolens Award winner is surely to be a highlight of next week’s Federation meeting.

Lisa Rein

Lisa Rein

Lisa Rein will be presented with the prestigious award Thursday. Lisa takes an active role as a director of the Federation. She solicited donors for present and future gifts through her service on the Annual Campaign team and the Life & Legacy endowment development committee. Lisa was a member of the 2015 Federation leadership program that traveled to Israel and has been a strong advocate since. A person of integrity, Lisa is a dedicated member of Congregation Beth Shalom in Arlington and she is grateful to call it her congregational family and spiritual home, with Cantor Sheri Allen as its leader. Lisa is a financial advisor with Ameriprise Financial. She is the proud parent of two children, Rachel and David, and has been happily married to Michael for 31 years. Mazal tov Lisa!

Richard Baratz: a ‘portrait’ of artistic talent

“Find something that you love to do and you’ll never have to work a day in your life.”
Familiar advice for finding one’s life’s work and very appropriate for caricaturist and multitalented artist Richard Baratz, whose passion for drawing is among his earliest, treasured memories. “From a very early age, I picked up something to draw with on anything handy, and at age 10, I began art school,” Baratz said.
For the next three months, Fort Worth’s Beth-El Congregation will showcase his work in “Capturing the Famous and the Familiar.”
Diverse, creative and eclectic aptly describe his decades of artistic creation, including scenes of New York, cowboys and the Old West, and Judaic art, both cultural and religious, executed in watercolor, pastel, pen and ink, and various types of mixed media.

Submitted photo Richard Baratz will showcase his caricatures during the next three months at Fort Worth’s Beth-El Congregation.

Submitted photo
Richard Baratz will showcase his caricatures during the next three months at Fort Worth’s Beth-El Congregation.

Submitted photo Richard Baratz will showcase his caricatures during the next three months at Fort Worth’s Beth-El Congregation.

Submitted photo
Richard Baratz will showcase his caricatures during the next three months at Fort Worth’s Beth-El Congregation.

Submitted photo Richard Baratz will showcase his caricatures during the next three months at Fort Worth’s Beth-El Congregation.

Submitted photo
Richard Baratz will showcase his caricatures during the next three months at Fort Worth’s Beth-El Congregation.

In addition to his primary career as a currency engraver for the U.S. Bureau of Printing and Engraving, Baratz has served for more than 40 years as the caricaturist for Sardi’s, a 90-year-old New York City institution, which he describes as “a magnetic and exciting mecca for stage and theater professionals.” And, since 1995, he has also been the artist for the Bob Hope Cultural Center’s McCallum Theater in Palm Desert, California.
As Sardi’s fourth resident and longest-tenured artist, he has created more than 1,000 caricatures of Broadway stars, writers, directors and producers as well as other celebrities who have frequented the legendary restaurant.
Well-known in the New York theater district, Baratz, a Brooklyn native who studied at New York’s School of Visual Arts and the American Art School, relocated to Keller more than a dozen years ago. Since then, he created the majority of the caricatures from photos emailed to him by Sardi’s current owner, Max Klimavicius.
“Baratz’s engraving background brings a rich look to his work,” said the late Vincent Sardi, Jr. Specifically, cross-hatching used in engraving gives a three-dimensional look to caricatures, which have evolved to feature less exaggeration of features and greater emphasis on flattering, identifiable portrayals.
With decades of interacting with a great array of Broadway talent, both onstage and behind the scenes, Baratz has amassed some treasured memories. Among his favorites are Katharine Hepburn and Tom Hanks, both of whom he worked with in person. He brought Hepburn a dozen roses and found her “charmingly old-fashioned and solicitous of his welfare.” More recently, he flew to New York to caricature Tom Hanks, whom he termed “a regular guy and everybody’s friend.”

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Around the Town: New scholarship, Daytimers

Around the Town: New scholarship, Daytimers

Posted on 11 May 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

New scholarship at UT Law School

Marvin Blum and his law school classmate Talmage Boston recently established a scholarship at UT Law School, where they forged their friendship more than 35 years ago. Marvin shared the story, first published by the Texas law school, with the TJP:

Submitted photo Marvin Blum (left) and Talmage Boston established a scholarship at the University of Texas’ law school.

Submitted photo
Marvin Blum (left) and Talmage Boston established a scholarship at the University of Texas’ law school.

“Law school classmates and best friends Marvin Blum and Talmage Boston, both Class of 1978, came together to create one of the first Endowment for Excellence Scholarships in Law. This is their story. ‘Not only did we get a great education, but we made incredible friendships that have stayed with us our entire lives.’ That’s how Talmage Boston ’78 starts a conversation about his time at Texas law. ‘Friendships were forged amidst the daily adventures in and out of Townes Hall.’
“Boston, a successful commercial trial and appellate litigator at Winstead in Dallas, was always passionate about his law school years, but after graduation he wasn’t always a consistent donor. Then he got a chance to know Dean Ward Farnsworth.
“‘We found ourselves together at a UT football game.’ There, the two of them discussed not only a shared love of sports, but also the big challenge facing the law school in the new era of higher tuition and reduced support from the legislature: the lack of scholarship funds to compete with peer institutions. ‘The need was clear: outstanding students were going elsewhere.’ Boston began to turn the challenge — and the opportunity — over in his mind. That’s where Marvin Blum came in.
“‘My years at law school were years of relationships and memorable moments. The Class of ‘78 had a magical chemistry,’ recalls Blum, founder of The Blum Firm. the largest estate planning firm in Texas. A big part of that chemistry for Blum was his friendship with Boston. ‘At law school, a lot of what you learn is outside the classroom. Our business is a people business. The value of emotional intelligence and empathy is what prepares you for success in life. The person I learned most from was Talmage.’
“Boston was confident Blum would be open to his big idea: that they partner for a $100.000 Endowed Scholarship in Law. But the naturally conservative Blum wasn’t initially convinced. ‘My initial gut reaction was actually to say ‘No.’ Boston wasn’t deterred. ‘I said, “This is important for us. This endowment will be a testimony to our abiding friendship, which was cemented in law school.”’
“Blum began to see the opportunity in a new light. ‘After law school, I took a bold step in opening my own firm. In a way, it was Talmage’s boldness that inspired me to believe I could do that. A scholarship to honor our friendship? That was an easy “Yes.”’
“Both men have legacy on their minds. ‘The two things that matter the most are relationships and making memorable moments,’ muses Blum. ‘You can’t buy those with money, really, but you can foster it for other people with your resources.’
“Boston wants to repay his debt to the school by supporting the next generation of students. ‘The economic circumstances couldn’t have been better for all of us when we were in law school, and that was a factor in why we thrived. We had the energy and desire to give it our best every day for three years. The scholarship is an expression of our desire to give back to the institution that has given us so much.’
“Blum sums it up this way: ‘At Texas Law, we planted an acorn and it grew. It’s time now to plant another acorn.’”

Daytimers to watch Chicago

When the Daytimers convene next Wednesday, May 17 at noon, they will be feasting ona Mediterranean style lunch from Mediterranean Market and enjoying the musical film Chicago.
The late Roger Ebert reported that Chicago continued the reinvention of the musical that starts with Moulin Rouge. Although modern audiences don’t like to see stories interrupted by songs, apparently they like songs interrupted by stories.
This movie is a dazzling song-and-dance extravaganza, with just enough words to support the music and allow everyone to catch their breath between songs. You can watch it like you listen to an album, over and over.
The movie stars sweet-faced Renee Zellweger as Roxie Hart, who kills her lover and convinces her husband to pay for her defense; and Catherine Zeta-Jones as Velma Kelly, who broke up her vaudeville sister act by murdering her husband and her sister while they were engaged in a sport not licensed for in-laws. Richard Gere is Billy Flynn, the slick, high-priced attorney who boasts he can beat any rap, for a $5,000 fee.
This story, lightweight but cheerfully lurid, fueled Bob Fosse, John Kander and Fred Ebb’s original stage production of Chicago, which opened in 1975 and has been playing somewhere or other ever after.
Lunch will be catered by Mediterranean Market.
Lunch is $6 and includes a choice of lamb and beef gyro, chicken shawarma sandwich, tabula and hummus sandwich or falafel sandwich. There’s never a charge for the program, but a voluntary nominal contribution to support the continuation of the Daytimers programs is requested.
For reservations call Larry Steckler at 817-927-2736, leave your name, phone number and lunch choice on his voice mail, and he will call you back to confirm.

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Around the Town: Back from trip, lunch

Posted on 04 May 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Stryer, Levine back from Galápagos

Debbie (Stryer) and Larry Levine just returned from a 10-day expedition to the Galápagos Islands. It was an amazing experience that started out by going to the middle of the world in Quito, Ecuador.
From there on to the islands where the Stryers experienced nature at its finest. “There were so many animals and birds that can only be found on the Galápagos.
“From Blue Footed Boobies to iguanas, sea lions, penguins, dolphins, flying fish, huge 100-plus-year-old tortoises and many more. Pretty remarkable!
“It was an exhausting trip but so worth it,” Debbie said.

Enjoyable lunch out

Who doesn’t love a Costco combo meal?
Kincaid’s Hamburgers, a longtime favorite of Fort Worthians, has a tagline that says, “Where friends meet to eat.”
Well, it seems that Costco is also a place that many community members catch up with each other. Dr. Carole Rogers, director of Jewish Family Services, had hot dogs and a nice visit with Elsie Blum and Bootsie Coggan recently.
Just as they were about to finish, Cindy Simon came by and ordered yogurt for everyone. It was an unexpected but delightful get-together for everyone.
Memorial Day service honoring Jewish War Veterans
The Martin Hochster memorial Post 755 invites everyone to attend its annual Roll of Honor service at 10 a.m. Sunday, May 28, in the Kornbleet Chapel of Ahavath Sholom Cemetery, 415 North University Drive, Fort Worth. This service will honor the fallen Jewish veterans of Fort Worth and Tarrant County. By attending, you will remember the sacrifices made in defending our nation by our Jewish veterans. Jewish War Veterans has been honoring the congregants from all the synagogues for many years. They invite the families of the Jewish veterans to attend the ceremony that honors their loved ones. The guest speaker will be J. P. Hogan, Col. (Ret.) U.S. Army, executive vice president, Association of the U.S. Army for Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma.

Academic grant program

Please remember that the Fort Worth B’nai B’rith Chapter offers two academic grants of $1,000 each: one for academic achievement and one for BBYO participation. Applications must be postmarked no later than May 30, 2017. Eligibility period is for high school seniors graduating between December 2016 and June 2017. Applicants must be accepted to an accredited college or university. For more information, contact your rabbi or Dr. Barry Schneider at dr_barrys@yahoo.com for application.

Additional grant available

The Jewish War Veterans (JWV) of Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma is offering a $1000 grant to relatives of active or deceased JWV members. Applications must be postmarked no later than May 30, 2017. Eligibility period is for high school seniors graduating between December 2016 and June 2017. Applicants must be accepted to an accredited college or university.
Contact Dr. Barry Schneider at dr_barrys@yahoo.com for applications.

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Around the Town: Yom HaShoah

Around the Town: Yom HaShoah

Posted on 27 April 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Tarrant County’s Yom HaShoah

Holocaust survivor and author Ben Lesser participated Sunday, April 23, in Tarrant County’s Yom HaShoah observance to share his story of survival and ensure the world never forgets the lessons of the Holocaust. The program was held at Beth Israel in Colleyville.
Ben also spoke to junior high school students on Monday, April 24, in Princeton, Texas, to share his family’s story and encourage the students to join his grassroots anti-hate, anti-bullying campaign, I-Shout-Out.IMG_2657
“The souls of our dear departed ones, all 6 million of them, are crying out to the world in a single word — zachor — which means to remember,” Ben said. “As we honor those lost on this National Holocaust Remembrance Day, we must also educate others so the lessons of the Holocaust will inspire today’s children to recognize, combat and ultimately extinguish the hatred that breeds genocide.”
Born in Krakow Poland in 1928 to a family of seven, Ben and his older sister, Lola, were the only family survivors of Hitler’s Nazi regime. During five years of living hell on earth, Ben was fortunate to survive several ghettos; four concentration camps, including the notorious Auschwitz, Buchenwald and Dachau; two death marches; and two death trains. He is the only living survivor of the notorious Dachau death train that brought him to the concentration camp three days before American liberation.
Lesser has made it his life’s mission to share his story, launching The Zachor Holocaust Remembrance Foundation, to ensure the world never forgets the lessons of the Holocaust. He founded I-Shout-Out, an interactive, grassroots, anti-hate campaign to put an end to intolerance by promoting supporters to speak up and out for those who cannot. The goal of the campaign is to garner 6 million shout-outs, one for each of the 6 million voices that were silenced by the Holocaust. By shouting out, participants in the campaign will sign the I-Shout-Out virtual wall, leaving a lasting legacy for generations to come to confront intolerance.
“The Holocaust and other tragedies all stem from the same base of intolerance. If people had exhibited tolerance and confronted Hitler’s hate, my family, along with the 6 million others, could have been saved, instead of destroyed,” Lesser said.
I-Shout-Out is powered by Zachor Holocaust Remembrance Foundation. The Zachor Holocaust Remembrance is recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) charity. Its websites are www.i-shout-out.org and www.ZachorFoundation.org; Twitter: @I_Shout_Out; Facebook: IShoutOutCampaign.
At the event at Princeton High School, Ben urged every student to join him in his I-Shout-Out effort by signing onto the online campaign and speaking up for what they believe in. Shouting out sends a unified message that individuals are not alone and upholds the fundamental values of respect that human beings deserve.
“At his very root, Hitler was a bully who was allowed to spread his message of hate across Europe because of those who did not take a stand,” Lesser said. “I have come to understand that so much of what happens in life is a result of seemingly simple human choices. We can choose not to hate. We can choose not to use hateful speech. Together, we can create a more peaceful and tolerant world.”
Recent studies indicate nearly one out of every five school children between the ages of 12 and 18 experiences bullying, an aggressive, harassing behavior of another individual. As he speaks to school groups and community organizations across the country, Ben challenges students and adults to join the I-Shout-Out campaign to raise awareness of the bullying epidemic that affects these hundreds of thousands of children each day.
Lesser’s story of courage, determination and achievement is detailed in his memoir Living A Life That Matters: from Nazi Nightmare to American Dream and is used in classrooms across the country to educate school children on the lessons of the Holocaust. To learn more about Lesser’s story of survival, visit zachorfoundation.org. To learn more and participate in the I-Shout-Out challenge, visit i-shout-out.org.

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Around the Town: Passover celebration

Posted on 20 April 2017 by admin

Submitted report

Every year Beth-El religious school students celebrate Passover  differently to create  new  memories of joy and alternate ways to see this beautiful  holiday.
Last year Beth El  kids learned many different Passover customs around the world. This year they celebrated: community, family, memory, history and nature  by celebrating the four names of Passover.  They divided the great Hall into four clear sections: Chag Ha Pesach (pascle lumb), Chag Ha Matzot  (matzah), Chag HaAviv (Spring) and Chag HaCherut(freedom). The students learned important  lessons, tasted the related food, danced, sang and       worked on a special project related to that name.
— Submitted by Ilana Knust

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Around the Town: Read2Win, teacher appreciation

Around the Town: Read2Win, teacher appreciation

Posted on 13 April 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Read2Win program

Rabbi Andrew Bloom recently shared his thoughts on Ahavath Sholom’s participation in the Read2Win program at Westcliff Elementary:
“In Chapter 1 of the Book of Genesis we read that ‘man is created in the image of God,’ (Genesis 1:26) and from this we can interpret that since God is the God of creation, we as human beings are now partners in the ongoing creation/evolution of the world.

 (From left) Tarrant.Net Pastor Sultan Cole, Ahavath Sholom Rabbi Andrew Bloom, Westcliff Elementary Principal Sara Gillaspie, Sara Perez of Read2Win and KaKeycia Sims.

(From left) Tarrant.Net Pastor Sultan Cole, Ahavath Sholom Rabbi Andrew Bloom, Westcliff Elementary Principal Sara Gillaspie, Sara Perez of Read2Win and KaKeycia Sims.

“One of the essential elements of creation is an environment for education. For education is the foundation of both an individual’s and society’s future. Education is so important that the Talmud teaches us, ‘He who teaches a child is as if he had created it.’ (Talmud, Sanhedrin 19b) In other words, we are creators of the mind.
“Yesterday (March 30), 21 volunteers from Congregation Ahavath Sholom partnering with Read2Win and Westcliff Elementary School went through orientation in preparation for our volunteers to complement the ‘holy work’ that teachers do in the classroom by supplementing, reading and mentoring 44 first-graders on a weekly basis. Thus strengthening their literacy capabilities. We will begin our tutoring next week.
“There are 37 out of 83 elementary schools in the FWISD that participate in the Read2Win program and according to the Read2Win leadership ‘this is only the second or third time that the entire need of a school has been covered by a faith based organization at its initial training.’ This is something of which we should all be proud. I feel truly blessed to be the rabbi of Ahavath Sholom.
“Our entire congregation can continue to make a difference in the lives of a child and there will be additional exciting opportunities to partner with Westcliff Elementary on top of the Read2Win program.

 Ahavath Sholom members engage with Westcliff students

Ahavath Sholom members engage with Westcliff students

“I look forward to sharing those with you in the near future.
“I would like to add onto L’Dor V’Dor ‘from generation to generation’ to now include ‘from reader to reader.’ ”
— Submitted by Michael Linn

Teacher appreciation and Jewish pride go hand in hand at Beth El

At Beth El Congregation, Sunday, April 2, wasn’t only a Teacher Appreciation, but also a day of Jewish pride. The religious school held a  beautiful 45-minute ceremony where teachers marched onto the red carpet into the sanctuary and sat on the bima. Children gave them flowers, gifts and told them thank you in many languages.
After the ceremony, everyone returned to their classes, where the lesson centered on a very important question: Why should we be proud to be Jewish?” The day culminated in the Great Hall all together for a family Jewish identity project, which was a huge success. The Israeli artist Piven’s unique technique was a jumping off point to communicate Jewish ideas and Jewish pride.
— Submitted by Ilana Knust

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Around the Town: A time to act

Around the Town: A time to act

Posted on 30 March 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

A Time to Act

National Health Decisions Day is April 16, and on Sunday, March 19, the Advance Care Planning Committee of Fort Worth and Tarrant County contributed to this effort with “A Time to Act.” Seventy people showed up early to Beth-El Congregation to talk about the subject that no one wants to talk about: planning for the future if we are confronted with serious illness or trauma.
Chaplain David Lowe from Baylor, Scott & White engaged and amused the crowd with his presentation focusing on the Advance Care Documents themselves, and why they are so important to complete. The big takeaway: Even if you have written documents, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have a plan. Having a plan means talking to your loved ones face to face so that they understand exactly what your wishes are, and making sure that they could verbalize those wishes back to you.

(From left) “A Time to Act” speakers, Rabbi Andrew Bloom, Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger, Chaplain David Lowe, Cantor Sheri Allen and Dr. Kendra Belfi

(From left) “A Time to Act” speakers, Rabbi Andrew Bloom, Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger, Chaplain David Lowe, Cantor Sheri Allen and Dr. Kendra Belfi

On March 12, Beth-El Congregation hosted Hamantaschen with Dads. Dads enjoyed celebrating Purim with their kids at the festive event.

On March 12, Beth-El Congregation hosted Hamantaschen with Dads. Dads enjoyed celebrating Purim with their kids at the festive event.

On March 12, Beth-El Congregation hosted Hamantaschen with Dads. Dads enjoyed celebrating Purim with their kids at the festive event.

On March 12, Beth-El Congregation hosted Hamantaschen with Dads. Dads enjoyed celebrating Purim with their kids at the festive event.

On March 12, Beth-El Congregation hosted Hamantaschen with Dads. Dads enjoyed celebrating Purim with their kids at the festive event.

On March 12, Beth-El Congregation hosted Hamantaschen with Dads. Dads enjoyed celebrating Purim with their kids at the festive event.

On March 12, Beth-El Congregation hosted Hamantaschen with Dads. Dads enjoyed celebrating Purim with their kids at the festive event.

On March 12, Beth-El Congregation hosted Hamantaschen with Dads. Dads enjoyed celebrating Purim with their kids at the festive event.

Dr. Kendra Belfi, former president of the Coalition for Quality End of Life Care, helped define various life-sustaining treatments and their benefits and burdens, and dispelled some of the myths associated with those treatments. The takeaway here: Those treatments don’t always work as well as they do on television! And a representative from Lifegift, the organ donation center, gave us some staggering statistics about how many lives can be saved from one person’s donation alone.
The participants also viewed several videos from the Jewish Theological Seminary, featuring different rabbis framing those medical interventions through the lens of Jewish law. This was followed by a panel discussion with the guest speakers, as well as Rabbi Andrew Bloom from Congregation Ahavath Sholom, and Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger of Beth-El Congregation. Everyone left armed with all the information and resources they needed in order to make informed decisions. And each received a Medical Power of Attorney form as well as a Living Will, to fill out after having these important conversations with their loved ones.
Their mission upon leaving: Complete these documents by National Health Care Decisions Day! The “A Time to Act” resource guide is available online at the Jewish Federation website (http://bit.ly/2o2ijbX), so don’t delay. Mark April 16 as the day to give one of the greatest gifts you can pass on to your family: peace of mind and a plan!
— Submitted by Cantor Sheri Allen

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Around the Town: Reading mentorship, scholarships

Posted on 23 March 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

CAS to participate in reading mentorship program

At press time, Rabbi Andrew Bloom announced that Congregation Ahavath Sholom would participate in a reading mentorship program with Westcliff Elementary School. Rabbi Bloom wrote in an email:
“The Fort Worth Literacy Partnership recently reported that ‘just three out of 10 Fort Worth ISD third-graders read on grade level.’ This is both shocking and sad, and how wonderful would it be for us to help raise this statistic so that more of our children succeed in providing a good future for themselves and their future families.
“It is in this light that I am proud to announce that through Compassionate Fort Worth, TarrantNet and the ‘Read to Win’ project that CAS has been chosen as a mentoring congregation in helping the reading and general language performance of first-graders at Westcliff Elementary School.
“Two weeks ago I was able to meet with the director and the coordinator of community outreach from TarrantNet and the principal of Westcliff Elementary School to finalize our adopting of the school. I am proud to say that we are the first synagogue to participate in this important program.
“We need volunteers to give of their time and talents once a week for an hour of your choosing to come and work with two individual first-graders for 30 minutes each. The lesson plans, teaching areas and training will all be provided by Westcliff Elementary School. Westcliff Elementary has been deemed a school in need of partnership and I have no doubt that this relationship will last for many years to come. We are blessed to be partnering with them.
“We will begin this project during the first week of April with training occurring in the next 10 days. In order to participate you must first fill out this FWISD background check form https://volunteer.fwisd.org/ as well as letting me know what days and times you are available. School starts at 8 a.m. Children over the age of 12 can volunteer with the participation of an adult.
“In Judaism we believe in ‘L’Dor V’Dor,’ from ‘generation to generation.’ This value reinforces the importance of our children and our responsibility toward them and their futures.
“I look forward to all of us making a difference in a child’s life and am excited that we are now part of this fantastic program. Let us all ‘Read to Win!’ For by doing this, all of us and the children of Westcliff Elementary will be winners.”
If you are interested, please contact Rabbi Bloom with any questions and let him know what time you can volunteer and when you have filled out the background checks. He can be reached at rabbi.bloom@ahavathsholom.org or 817-731-4721.

Applications open for annual youth scholarships

The Isadore Garsek B’nai B’rith Lodge No. 269 will offer two $1,000 college scholarships. Applicants must be high school seniors graduating between December 2016 and June 2017. Parents or guardians must be members of the Isadore Garsek Lodge and/or members of an established Jewish congregation in Tarrant County. The parent or guardian must be a member in good standing for a period of 12 months before submission of the application. Children of deceased parents are also eligible if the parent died while a member for at least 12 consecutive months.
Awards will be presented at a date and time determined. Recipients will be notified in mid-June 2017.
The Academic Grant is a competitive and will be awarded based on overall academic achievement, GPA, Standardized Admission Test (SAT or ACT) and extracurricular activities. The BBYO Participation Grant is based on BBYO activities, leadership roles and active participation in local, regional and national events. The deadline for applying for either or both scholarships is May 31, 2017.
For more information or to request an application contact your rabbi, youth advisor, education director or Dr. Barry Schneider at dr_ barrys@ yahoo.com.

News and notes

  • On Sunday, April 2, The Federation’s Partnership2Gether committee will present a special public presentation from the Galilee Medical Center featuring Dr. Tal Marshak and Dr. Yoav Hoffman, who will speak on how Israel is helping Syria’s injured. The program is from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at Beth-El Congregation. This event is free to attend and open to the public.
  • The Isadore Garsek Lodge of B’nai B’rith Annual Community Senior Seder will be held at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 5, at Beth-El. To join the festivities, call Lesly at the JFS office at 817-569-0898.
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Purim Punims

Posted on 23 March 2017 by admin

Purim Punims
Jews around the Dallas area celebrated Purim earlier this month. Here is a sampling of celebration from area congregations that submitted photos.

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Around The Town: Emergency preparedness, Sweet Beginnings, Rockin’ Ruach

Around The Town: Emergency preparedness, Sweet Beginnings, Rockin’ Ruach

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Firsthand accounts of emergency preparedness and caring for war casualties

Two physicians who have served on the front lines of war caring for northern border Israeli civilians and war casualties from neighboring countries — most recently Syrian refugees — will speak at UNT Health Science Center on Monday, April 3.

Dr. Tal Marshak

Dr. Tal Marshak

Dr. Yoav Hoffman

Dr. Yoav Hoffman

Dr. Yoav Hoffman and Dr. Tal Marshak of Galilee Medical Center will discuss their work and share personal experiences with emergency preparedness during times of war, co-hosted by the UNTHSC School of Public Health and TCOM.
This visit is part of Partnership2Gether, a joint program of the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County and the Jewish Agency, to promote mutually beneficial endeavors and connections between the local community and the Western Galilee region.
Dr. Hoffman is assistant director of the hospital’s Pediatric Intensive Care Department (PICU). Since 2013, the PICU has taken care of pediatric casualties from Syria as well as serving the local population.
With responsibility for mass casualty events preparedness, Dr. Hoffman leads the hospital during emergency situations such as war, fires and chemical disasters.
Dr. Marshak is senior surgeon and head of the Rhinology and Skull Base Surgery Unit.
Since 1956, Galilee Medical Center has served as the largest government hospital in its region and currently treats a local population of 600,000.
After the medical center was bombed during the 2006 Lebanon War, an entire underground hospital was created, to provide uninterrupted service during times of crisis.
The April 3 conversation with these physicians is open to UNTHSC students, faculty, staff and the community and is the kickoff event for Public Health Week 2017. The event will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. in MET 125. Advance registration is not required.
Hoffman and Marshak will be Shabbat service guest speakers at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 31, at Beth-El Congregation and will also conduct a lecture from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 2, at Beth-El Congregation in the chapel. They will present on their work at the Galilee Medical Center, and share their personal experiences with emergency preparedness in times of war and treating Syrian refugees.
For more information, contact Dr. Marcy L. Paul, UNTHSC School of Public Health, at marcy.paul@unthsc.edu or 817-735-0537 or Bob Goldberg, 817-569-0892.
— Submitted by UNT Health Science Center and Bob Goldberg

Beth-El Congregation hosts Sweet Beginnings interactive dessert event

Have a sweet tooth? Even if you don’t you’re likely to develop one at “Sweet Beginnings” — Beth-El Congregation’s unique interactive dessert experience that will feature sweet tastings and chef demonstrations, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 25.
In celebrating Beth-El’s new “sweet beginnings” with Rabbi Brian and Mimi Zimmerman, honorary chairs of the fundraiser, Event Co-chairs Stacie Goldman, Neta Mandel and Alice Pritchard have created what is to be an exceptional evening where participants will get to decorate, sample, explore, taste, and devour a myriad of desserts in three specialty shops: The Ice Cream Parlor, The Bakery and The Chocolate Shop.
With over 40 community partners donating their time, talent and everything else from DQ Blizzards to bakery favorites, there will be something for everyone from sugar-free to gluten-free — a sure recipe for a fun celebration.
Chef demonstrations will feature best-selling cookbook author Holly Clegg, Culinary School of Fort Worth Founder Judie Byrd, chef extraordinaire Louise Lamensdorf and Central Market’s Master Pastry Chef Sarah Hooton.
Other “feastivities” will include the blending of sweet “spirits” with mixologists from Pacific Table, a unique whiskey tasting experience, live entertainment and raffle items.
And, a Beth-El Sweet Beginnings cookbook with recipes collected from congregants, family and friends will be available.
Different giving levels can be found on Beth-El’s website, www.bethelfw.org; individual tickets are $36.
For additional information and/or questions, please contact Neta Mandel at netacm@yahoo.com or 817-917-3320.
— Submitted by Jane Cohen

Rockin’ Ruach Shabbat

Cantor Shoshana Abrams Kaikov and her all-star musicians will fill Shabbat with Big Band sounds at Rockin’ Ruach Shabbat at 6 p.m. Friday, March 24, at Congregation Ahavath Sholom. An “All-American” Oneg will follow.
Hadassah takes turn in Austin
Join Hadassah for 2017 Date with the State. From April 2 to 3, Hadassah members will visit representatives and senators at the Capitol in Austin for an exhilarating and educational advocacy experience.
Beginning at 5 p.m. Sunday, April 2, through Monday afternoon, the program will provide an opportunity for you — as Jews, as women, as Zionists — to advocate on issues important to American Jewish women, including anti-BDS legislation, U.S.-Israel relations, preventative health care, stem cell research and treatment, and more.
The fee to attend is $36 per person. A limited amount of hotel rooms are available.
For more information or to receive a registration form, please contact Debby Rice at rice.debby@gmail.com or call the Greater Southwest Region office at 713-661-1022.

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