Archive | Around the Town

Grace Goldman’s daffodils make memories blossom

Grace Goldman’s daffodils make memories blossom

Posted on 01 March 2018 by admin

By Deb Silverthorn

As the next generation blossoms, many are taking it into their own hands to help the world bloom. That’s exactly what Fort Worth Country Day School senior Grace Goldman is doing by planting a daffodil garden.
“We had a butterfly garden in the lower school, and a veteran’s garden in the middle school, and I thought it was time to include the upper school,” said Goldman, who brought The Daffodil Project to her campus.
Am Yisrael Chai, an Atlanta-based nonprofit Holocaust education and awareness organization, developed The Daffodil Project in 2010 by planting 1,800 bulbs. An estimated 465,000 bulbs have been planted throughout the United States, Canada, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Israel and the Netherlands since then.
The program provides the first 250 bulbs at no cost, and the participating organization must plant another 250 within two years. Some plant many times that amount. In addition to empowering Holocaust education, the program, open to schools, congregations and organizations, supports projects helping children suffering humanitarian crises in Darfur, Rwanda and Southern Sudan.
“We chose these daffodils because they’re the shape and color of the Jewish star that was worn by so many Jews who perished, and for those who escaped with their lives,” said Andrea Videlefsky, president of Am Yisrael Chai and founder of The Daffodil Project. “It was a sign meant to designate those who should die, and we’re planting these as a designation of blossoming life and a future for the Jews.
“Daffodils blossom for a short while, just as the lives of the Jewish children were short, but these come back each year and allow us each year to remember those children, and all who died. We hope to plant at least 1.5 million, one for each of those children.”
The Daffodil Project addresses issues of hatred and bigotry that Videlefsky says seemingly can be found everywhere. “We want to create spaces of peace and tolerance, of understanding, against the injustices we see around the world today,” she said. “It’s important for everyone to remember to take a stand — and not stand by.”
Goldman, daughter of Elliot and Heather and sister of Grant, plays field hockey, soccer and golf at Country Day. She will attend Wake Forest University in the fall.
A member of the Link Crew peer mentor program, she is a student ambassador and a member of the art and diversity clubs. She is also involved in many service organizations.
“While the garden was a way to expand on the curriculum and ensure our remembrance of the event, it is also a way for me to honor my great-grandmother’s memory,” said Goldman, who with her father led an assembly for her classmates, explaining her heritage and why the Daffodil Project was so important to her.
Goldman’s great-grandmother Blanche was a survivor of Auschwitz who was sent to a labor camp rather than the death camps. Because her fingers curved outward, she spent her days assembling munitions and her nights knitting for a female SS officer.
“I’m glad Grace found she could relate to this story and that she has made this a project and priority,” said Goldman’s grandmother and Blanche’s daughter, Rachel. “She’s a leader, always initiating goodness.”
Learning of her great-grandmother’s history, Goldman was further inspired when reading Elie Wiesel’s book Night, and then by Wiesel’s courage.
Goldman first proposed her project to her English teachers, suggesting it as a partner to Night, required reading at her school. Important to her was the connection between the reading of the book and her own personal story. She thought her classmates would be further inspired by the personal association.
Goldman connected Am Yisrael Chai with her school’s administration, and then worked with the school’s grounds supervisor to determine an appropriate space and plan forward.
“Grace and her family have always been involved in our school and this deep dedication to her own heritage has benefited us all,” said Eric Lombardi, Fort Worth Country Day head of school. “She made it happen and did so in her wonderfully high-energy way, bringing our school community together with a worldwide effort. We are very proud.”
A commemorative plaque at the site includes Wiesel’s words: “How can a person not be moved by compassion? And above all, how can anyone who remembers remain silent?”
“Daffodils are resilient; they come back every year,” said Goldman. “I hope the memory of those who perished will too.”
For information on planting your own garden, visit daffodilproject.net.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Around the Town:  Harriette and Arnie Gachman

Around the Town: Harriette and Arnie Gachman

Posted on 22 February 2018 by admin

By Sharon Wisch-Ray

Fort Worth and Tarrant County have a terrific evening planned March 3, when Harriette and Arnie Gachman will be presented with the Manny and Roz Rosenthal Spirit of Federation Award at the Federation’s Annual Big Event. The entertainment should be fantastic as well with comedian Joel Chasnoff followed by a culinary demonstration by Israeli-born restaurateur Einat Admony. I remember hearing Joel Chasnoff for the first time about 15 years ago. He was the featured entertainer at the American Jewish Press Association’s annual conference. He is funny. And, from what I hear, he’s refined his act over the years and it’s only gotten better. In November he appeared at a sold-out Shearith Israel Sisterhood fundraiser in Dallas and received rave reviews. I can’t think of anyone more deserving of the Manny and Roz Rosenthal Spirit of Federation Award than Harriette and Arnie Gachman They are mensches defined. Read on for more details.
Federation will fete Gachmans at Campaign Big Event, March 3
Do you like to laugh? Do you like to eat delicious food? Of course you do, so make a point of going to Belly Laughs, Comedy that Cooks! At 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 3, come to Beth-El to celebrate the Jewish Federation’s 2018 Annual Campaign Big Event!
Be entertained by Israeli-born restaurateur Einat Admony, the owner of four New York City restaurants who’s won the TV show Chopped! twice, and Texas-born comedian Joel Chasnoff, who served in the Israeli army and wrote a best-selling memoir about it.
During the event, the Federation will honor Harriette and Arnie Gachman with its most prestigious honor, the Manny and Roz Rosenthal Spirit of Federation Award.
On April 7, 2016, with the support of the Rosenthal family the Federation presented the Manny and Roz Rosenthal Spirit of Federation Award for the first time. This award was created to honor the Rosenthal family’s long-standing dedication to the Fort Worth Jewish community’s well-being and its first honorees were Roz Rosenthal and Lou Barnett. Last year, the Federation honored Marcia Kurtz with this prestigious award.
This year, the Jewish Federation honors the steadfast leadership of Arnie and Harriette Gachman.
When asked what receiving this award means to them, Arnie shared, “Our community leaders realized that to sustain Federation is to preserve Jewish values, culture and tzedakah.
“Harriette and I have learned from your past honorees and many other wonderful contributors of past generations the need for Federation. The result is a Federation that touches every Jewish person and many others in Tarrant County every day. Simply, the modern model not only helps Jewish needs around the world; it supports needs in our own community.
“Manny and Roz and all the past recipients guided and mentored us through example and inclusion. We are humbled and loving of those previously recognized. We would never seek a reward or anything self-serving for doing what is a mitzvah. The highest form of giving is giving anonymously, yet years ago these past honorees and leaders explained that it is important that others know that you are a part of community that is counted on to make a difference.”
The Fort Worth Jewish community is indebted to Arnie and Harriette for the leadership that they have given, and continue to give, to its Jewish community.
“We are thrilled to honor them with this special award. Please join us March 3 at Belly Laughs to help us say thank you,” said Bob Goldberg, Federation executive director.
Arnie summed up his and Harriette’s feelings about the future of the Fort Worth and Tarrant County Jewish community, “Our Jewish community’s future is bright, as Tarrant County will grow rapidly. The challenge is what legacy will enrich our children and future generations? What will we do to build that legacy? Our Federation joining with all our synagogues has a plan to make that happen. Progress and results only happen when we are willing to share and commit our time, energy, knowledge and generosity to make a better Jewish community.”
The 2018 Annual Campaign Big Event, Belly Laughs is Saturday, March 3, at 7:30 p.m. at Beth-El Congregation. Tickets are $18 per person. RSVP by calling the Federation office at 817-569-0892 or email Cindy Simon at c.simon@tarrantfederation.org or go online to https://www.tarrantfederation.org/2018-annual-campaign.
Event co-chairs are Federation President Diane Kleinman and Campaign Co-chairs Cheryl Visosky and Robert Simon, who have been working diligently to plan a fabulous evening.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Ahavath Sholom, FWISD reach agreement

Posted on 15 February 2018 by admin

By Sharon Wisch-Ray

As expected, members of Congregation Ahavath Sholom, on Sunday, overwhelmingly approved the sale of its vacant parcel of land, a little more than 6 acres, to the Fort Worth Independent School District. The FWISD Board of Education approved the land purchase at its Tuesday evening meeting on a 5-0 vote even though several members were out sick. The trustees authorized Superintendent Kent Scribner to execute a contract with Ahavath Sholom soon. The land will also need platting approval from the City of Fort Worth.

The land will be used “as the future home of a new elementary school to provide overcrowding relief at nearby Tanglewood Elementary,” a FWISD release said Tuesday.

“From the very beginning, we had hoped to arrive at a fair resolution that is amicable to all parties,” said Scribner. “We are pleased for our children that this agreement provides a path for us to move forward with our design and construction plans.”

The sale price of the property is $6.8 million.

“The synagogue was happy with the school’s offer and the Fort Worth Independent School District did give a fair value,” explained Ahavath Shalom board member Steven Brown, an attorney who spearheaded the negotiations for the synagogue.

Three weeks ago, it looked like the synagogue would move forward with a lucrative deal with 4050 Hulen Partners, which wanted to build an upscale retirement community on the property. However, the interests of what was best for Fort Worth, its children and everyone involved prevailed, Brown said. He reiterated many times that everyone was pleased that Ahavath Sholom and the FWISD were able to come to terms.

“We will all be good neighbors,” Brown explained. “This school is right in the middle of all of the churches. The churches have been there for a long time. So, the setting of the school in the middle of all of the religious organizations is quite unique.”

Co-chairs Rhoda Bernstein and Murray Cohen, Marvin Beleck and Naomi Rosenfield joined Brown on the Focus on the Future Committee that worked on the issue for the past 1½ years.

“It was a real team effort,” Brown said, “And, we finally brought it to fruition.”

Elliott Garsek and Ahavath Shalom Rabbi Andrew Bloom were other key members of the team.

Garsek and his law firm Barlow Garsek & Simon were instrumental to the negotiations, serving as consultants and representing Ahavath Sholom throughout the process, Brown said. Garsek’s roots at the synagogue run deep. He grew up there, and his father, Rabbi Isadore Garsek, served as Ahavath Sholom’s spiritual leader from 1946 to 1979 and as rabbi emeritus until his death in 1985.

Bloom’s involvement with Mayor Betsy Price’s Faith Based Cabinet, Compassionate Fort Worth, Read2Win at Westcliff and the Task Force on Race and Culture, which he co-chairs, also helped.

Bloom’s passion for making Fort Worth a better place for all people and the relationships he’s built across the city demonstrated Ahavath Sholom’s goodwill in action, Brown said.

The rabbi tipped his kippah to Price.

“The mayor was a tremendous help in facilitating the betterment of the synagogue, the school board and the community,” Bloom said. “She saw that partnership and the continuing partnership of the synagogue, city and school board with tremendous vision, and she was willing to see where it would go together. She understood how to make it tremendously beneficial for all of us.”

Bloom said he is looking forward to the synagogue looking inward and assessing where it needs to go from here with the proceeds from the land sale.

“The next steps are for us to send out RFPs and get advice on whether or not it makes sense to renovate or rebuild,” Focus on the Future Committee Co-chair Bernstein said. She explained that there has been a strategic plan in place for the building, with Rebecca and Stuart Isgur chairing that committee.

Though it will have the proceeds from the sale of the land, the synagogue will most likely have to have some kind of capital campaign to raise the balance.

“It’s an exciting time,” Bernstein said. “Hopefully this will be an exciting process that everyone in the congregation can get behind. We do not have time restraints. We to take the time to make it happen and to do it right.”

One person who has wanted some change for the building for many years is Bernstein’s 99-year-old father, Lou Barnett, a past Ahavath Sholom president. Bernstein said that even five or six years ago, her father was talking about the synagogue doing something with its vacant land.

“Dad is one of the very few of his generation who is still with us. He’s been wanting to see this happen and had the vision long before Murray and I started working to make it reality three years ago.”

Bloom said it may have been fortuitous that the timing of the deal coincided with Parashat Shekalim.

“In the Torah this past weekend, we read about the half shekel and how each person complements each other to make it a full shekel,” Bloom said. “The school board, the city and ourselves are all complementing each other, and in the end, it works out for the betterment of everyone.”

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Around the Town: New novel, B’nai B’rith

Around the Town: New novel, B’nai B’rith

Posted on 18 January 2018 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Korenman releases new novel

On Dec. 19, author Adam Korenman released his latest novel, When the Skies Fall, the second book in the Gray Wars Saga. The Fort Worth native began working on the series while a student at Paschal High School back in 2001, chipping away at chapters in his free time until he had the foundation for the story arc.

Adam Korenman has recently released his new novel When the Skies Fall, the second book in the Gray Wars Saga.

Adam Korenman has recently released his new novel When the Skies Fall, the second book in the Gray Wars Saga.

In 2015, he self-published his debut novel, When the Stars Fade, and ran a grassroots campaign through the Kindle Direct Publishing service. The success of WTSF garnered the interest of a local publisher in Los Angeles, California Coldblood Books. Now, Adam is signed on for the full six-book run, available wherever books are sold, including Amazon.
The series focuses on a cast of pilots, soldiers, and politicians all struggling to survive amid an intergalactic war. From the explosive battles in space to the nail-biting confrontations on the ground, the war for survival is brutal and endless. It has received praise from both military service-members and the sci-fi community, and was recently called “a veritable all you can eat buffet laid out for readers who hunger for gritty, realistic military science fiction.”
Adam was a captain in the U.S. Army from 2006 to 2017, serving with units from Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Cali-fornia. He now lives in Los Angeles with his wife.
When the Stars Fade and When the Skies Fall are available now.

B’nai B’rith Christmas tradition

For more than 30 years the B’nai B’rith Isadore Garsek Lodge in Fort Worth has served meals and provided gifts for the homeless on Christmas in Fort Worth.
This year over 50 B’nai B’rith members and volunteers from Congregation Beth Israel, Beth-El Congregation and Congregation Ahavath Sholom, along with members of the Christian community, joined together for this special annual event.

Longtime volunteers Dr. Al Faigin and B’nai B’rith Board Member Robert Chicotsky get ready to cook hundreds of eggs for breakfast.

Longtime volunteers Dr. Al Faigin and B’nai B’rith Board Member Robert Chicotsky get ready to cook hundreds of eggs for breakfast.

It’s held every year at Beautiful Feet Ministries in Southeast Fort Worth, a Christian organization that serves the poor and the needy. On Christmas Day the Jewish community takes over and serves a hot breakfast and a hot lunch and distributes toys, clothing and toiletries collected throughout the year.
Each year 100-150 homeless and needy guests have their day brightened when the Tarrant County Jewish community works side-by-side to help those in need.
— Submitted by Jim Stanton

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Around the Town: Studying Torah, art salon

Around the Town: Studying Torah, art salon

Posted on 11 January 2018 by admin

Spencer Weinstein, Denae Chance Rubinson, Sarah Price, Ethan Johnson, Karen Telschow Johnson

Spencer Weinstein, Denae Chance Rubinson, Sarah Price, Ethan Johnson, Karen Telschow Johnson

 Rabbi Bloom (left) and Rabbi Gurevitch

Rabbi Bloom (left) and Rabbi Gurevitch

 (From left) Linda Lavi, Sabrina Beleck, Sarah Lavi, Stephanie Dubinsky

(From left) Linda Lavi, Sabrina Beleck, Sarah Lavi, Stephanie Dubinsky

Sharon Miles, Carla Cowan

Sharon Miles, Carla Cowan

 Talya Galaganov, Marcy Paul, Shari Paul, Lauren Rocha, Rene Rocha

Talya Galaganov, Marcy Paul, Shari Paul, Lauren Rocha, Rene Rocha

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Studying Torah, creating art

More than 40 very creative community members gathered at the Fort Worth Community Arts Center to study Torah and create art Sunday, Jan. 7.
Rabbi Andrew Bloom of Congregation Ahavath Sholom and Rabbi Levi Gurevitch of Chabad of Arlington and Mid-Cities led a Torah study on Parashat Vaera. The themes discussed were about the hardening of Pharaoh’s heart, different ways in which one’s hearts can be blocked or unblocked, and how the plagues can be read not only as physical manifestations of God’s power but as preparation for the Jewish people to leave Egypt.
The art created during the morning included mosaics, paintings, glass art, photography and music. The participants drew heavily on the themes discussed during the study session and created some truly remarkable pieces. A video of the art produced is available on the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County Facebook page.
Special thanks go to Jan Ayers Friedman, Nan Phillips, Gloria Sepp, Marvin Beleck and Sarah Price, all from the Texas Jewish Arts Association, for leading each of the studios and creating the program. Hats off to Stephanie Dubinsky, Marla Owen, and the Fort Worth Community Arts Center for hosting the event. This program was sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth & Tarrant County and the Texas Jewish Arts Association with financial support from the Dan Danciger/Fort Worth Hebrew Day School Supporting Foundation.
— Submitted by Angie Friedman

Art salon: Barbara Goldstein

As part of the exhibit of renowned artist Barbara Goldstein’s collection that has been on display at Beth-El Congregation since late fall, the temple will hold an art salon from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 23, in the boardroom.
As previously reported in this column, Goldstein spent four months in Paris creating 22 paintings. Many of those paintings as well as others have been on display in the boardroom. On Jan. 23, the Goldstein family will share stories of their mother Barbara’s art world and capture the memories of her inspiration and adventures. If you own a Barbara Goldstein art piece, bring it with you and share your story.
Art salons date back to Paris in 1667 as an opportunity for artists, art lovers and others to gather, network and exchange ideas about art. Beth-El began holding its art salon in 2015.
— Submitted by Hollace Weiner

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Learn how fellow Jews are living in Hungary at Fort Worth brunch

Learn how fellow Jews are living in Hungary at Fort Worth brunch

Posted on 27 December 2017 by admin

Submitted report

The Jewish Federation of Fort Worth & Tarrant County will present Brunch & Budapest: A Revitalization of Jewish Life at 10 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 14, at Congregation Ahavath Sholom.
The event is part of the Federation’s 2018 Annual Campaign, co-chaired by Robert Simon and Cheryl Visosky. The Jewish community is invited to learn about what it’s like to be Jewish in Hungary today. Budapest has the largest postwar Jewish population in central Europe, and the city is at the forefront of the revitalization of Jewish life. Budapest is also a Partnership2Gether city with close ties to Fort Worth.

Submitted photo Marton Tordai, along with Hedi Pusztai, was born in Budapest and both were raised in secular Jewish homes. Both found their Jewish roots through Birthright.

Submitted photo
Marton Tordai, along with Hedi Pusztai, was born in Budapest and both were raised in secular Jewish homes. Both found their Jewish roots through Birthright.

Featured speakers will be Hedi Pusztai and Marton Tordai. Born in Budapest after the downfall of communism, both were raised in secular Jewish homes — Tordai’s family even celebrated Christmas. Both young Hungarians found their Jewish roots through connecting with Birthright. Pusztai made aliyah in 2009, and has been actively working both in Israel and Budapest with young adults through the Jewish Agency. Tordai, a millennial, made his trip in 2014 and has worked in Budapest since then to revive the Jewish community in the capital.
Since 2012, the Fort Worth and Tarrant County Federation’s Partnership2Gether consortium has made Budapest a sister city along with Akko and the Western Galilee in Israel. In Budapest, there are a large number of people who are Jewish by birth but whose families have not chosen to live a Jewish lifestyle. By creating community with young Jews in America and Israel, Partnership2Gether aims to support the revitalization of Jewish community in central Europe that was devastated by the Holocaust and Communism.
Brunch & Budapest event chair Lisa Rein  welcomes all. “Come feed your face, your mind and your soul. Your presence is important to support the hard work of these young pioneers.”

Pusztai

Pusztai

Brunch is free, but reservations are required by calling the Federation at 817-569-0892 or emailing c.simon@tarrantfederation.org.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

New program links text study, art making

New program links text study, art making

Posted on 27 December 2017 by admin

Marvin Beleck

Marvin Beleck

By James Russell
Special to the TJP

The usual takeaway from a Torah study is ethereal, ideally intellectual and spiritual enlightenment.
On Jan. 7 in Fort Worth, participants will take art home too. Through a Jewish Lens: A Day of Learning, Creation and Community is a new approach to Torah study sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County and the Texas Jewish Arts Association.
Participants, who must register by Dec. 29, can take classes in glass fusing, painting, mosaics, music composition and photography. Each artist is local and practices full-time. Studios are limited to 10 participants each.
The program has been years in the making, according to Angie Friedman, the program director at Federation who is spearheading the effort.
“I’ve wanted to do this for a few years. We just bit the bullet and said, ‘Let’s try it,’” Friedman said.

Nan Phillips

Nan Phillips

Participants will study text with local rabbis for the first hour.
At noon, participants then break out to one of the artist sessions. For the next two hours, they will respond to their studies with one of the artist facilitators.
Nan Phillips of Dallas is one of five participating artists. The fused and stained glass artist’s breakout session lets participants explore their readings in a hands-on way. It is just not purely an intellectual exercise toward spiritual growth. It’s an artistic exercise too, allowing people to interpret texts in new ways.
She is bringing a “baby kiln” for participants in her workshop, and some of her own work as well.
(She realizes some glass will not be ready in two hours and will fire the work for free and ship it.)
Other participating artists include Gloria Sepp, mosaic artist Marvin Beleck, violinist Sarah Price, who is leading a music composition class and photographer Jan Ayers Friedman. (She asks that participants bring a camera or smartphone.)

Sarah Price

Sarah Price

Participants do not just leave the daylong event full of wisdom but also with a piece of art, too.
The event fits with the TJAA’s mission of providing a network for Jewish artists. According to Phillips, the group, founded in 2013 and formalized in 2014, started with seven artists. The group’s membership now includes more than 100 artists. The event also fits the group’s mission of opening up opportunities for artists who are sometimes limited in participating in events. Gallery openings take place on a Friday evening or Saturday, which can be inconvenient for those who observe Shabbat.
“We needed something else,” Phillips said.
The approach for artists is different too.

Jan Friedman

Jan Friedman

The artists are not lecturing, Friedman said. They’re asking, “What do you want to make? How do I help you make it?” The day ends with a reception at the Center from 4 to 6 in the evening, where participants show their work.
The program may be new but it has generated substantial interest.
“There has already been a lot of interest. Some classes are almost full. But everyone is still welcome,” Friedman said.
Participants can sign up online at TarrantFederation.org/jewishlens, or by contacting Angie Friedman at 817-569-0892 or a.friedman@tarrantfederation.org.

Gloria Sepp

Gloria Sepp

 

*****

 

If you go …
Event: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with presentations from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 7, at the Scott Theater in the Fort Worth Community Arts Center, 1300 Gendy St., Fort Worth.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Around the Town: Gifts, mah jongg, vacations, meeting

Posted on 21 December 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Gifts for community

JFS Senior Director Hedy Collins tells us that “The Menschettes were at it again, wrapping over 100 gifts for the Jewish Family Services senior program and the Jewish community. They did a great job. Everything has ribbons and bows. Community donations make all of this possible. We thank the Menschettes and the community for their incredible support. Happy Hanukkah.”

Extra! Extra! Read all about it!

Jeremy Allen, son of Professor Richard Allen and Cantor Sheri Allen, has been promoted to staff editor for The New York Times special sections. Before this promotion, Jeremy was a senior news assistant, responsible for organizing the production of nearly 200 domestic and international special sections and designing many of them with the team’s art director. He has written several articles for the Times as well. Previously, he has worked for Vogue.com, GQ.com, Bloomberg.com, and Allure.com.
Jeremy graduated from the University of Southern California in 2010 with a fine arts degree and what he describes as “the ill-advised dream of working in layout and production for print media.” Seven years later, that dream has become a reality.
Jeremy attended the Fort Worth Hebrew Day School, Fort Worth Academy, and was valedictorian of his senior class at Arlington Heights High School. He loves living and working in Manhattan, attending Congregation Beit Simchat Torah, and attempting to tame his diva of a cat, Evita Carol.

Order mah jongg cards today

Suzie Herman is taking orders for the 2018 mah jongg cards. Your purchase benefits the Fort Worth Chapter of Hadassah. Standard cards are $8; large print are $9. Deadline is Jan. 19. Send your check and a copy of your order to Suzie Herman, 4701 Springwillow Road, Fort Worth TX 76109.
By the way, Debby Rice tells the TJP that Hadassah will have a citywide mah jongg tournament in 2018. It’s currently in the planning stages, so if you would like to be on the planning committee contact Debby Rice at 817-706-5158.

Great vacation for Levines

Debbie (Stryer) and Larry Levine recently returned from a trip overseas. They met Debbie’s college friends in Venice and spent several days seeing the sights, including the Jewish ghetto. They toured a couple of old synagogues in the ghetto. Debbie reported, “They are very beautiful!” Next, they got on a cruise ship and went to Montenegro and several ports in Greece. Of course, Athens included the Parthenon and Acropolis. Debbie added, “As with all vacations, it is sad when it comes to an end but it is a great opportunity to get home and plan for the next one.” They are looking forward to 2018!

Save the date: Jan. 7, 2018

The Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County and the Texas Jewish Artists Association will sponsor “Through a Jewish Lens: A Day of Learning, Creation & Community,” Sunday, Jan. 7. This will be a unique opportunity to study Jewish texts and apply what you learn to art. There is no charge, and the deadline to RSVP is Dec. 29. Stay tuned to this page next week for more detailed information.

 

*****

Beth-El joins in URJ Biennial

A six-member delegation from Beth-El Congregation attended the Union for Reform Judaism Biennial earlier this month. It was the largest URJ biennial gathering to date with more than 6,000 people in attendance. Clockwise from left, Rabbi Brian Zimmerman, Beth-El President Jeff Kaitcer, Beth-El Music Director John Sauvey, URJ North American board member Dr. Michael Ross and his wife Beverly Ross Not pictured is Jordyn Schwartz.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Around the Town: Happy 90th birthday, Corrine

Posted on 14 December 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Happy belated 90th birthday to Corrine Jacobson

Corrine Jacobson celebrated her 90th birthday with a monthlong celebration as family from San Francisco, Arizona, St. Louis, Dallas and Austin visited her.
Her actual birthday was Oct. 24. Corrine is also celebrating 80 years as a devoted congregant of Beth-El Congregation as well as a Fort Worth resident. Corrine is and always has been “sharp as a tack.” Dallas Morning News Watchdog columnist Dave Lieber featured Corrine in his Nov. 9 column titled “Granny watchdog offers advice to surviving spouses about how to get smart after losing a mate.”
The article details Corrine’s dogged fight to track down the person who stole mail from her mailbox and cashed $1,000 worth of checks. It also discusses her book, A Handbook for Widows, which she cowrote with Rose Rubin. Although the slim volume is now out of print, among Corrine’s best tips, as detailed by Lieber are: Funeral security: During a funeral, make sure someone stays at the family home. Thieves read obituaries. Top advice: Make sure both spouses’ names are jointly listed as primary holders on bank accounts, credit cards and all utility bills. Avoid major decisions: After a spouse’s death, avoid any quick life changes. For example, don’t immediately sell a home and move away. Don’t lose control: Avoid giving complete control to anyone else to be responsible for your finances. Seek advice and study subjects: Learn about finance and investment strategies you may not know about.
The full article is available online at http://bit.ly/2AN3i1v.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Around the Town: First responders, Hanukkah

Posted on 07 December 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Support veterans and first responders

The Martin Hochster Jewish War Veterans Post No. 755 and the Congregation Ahavath Sholom Ladies Auxiliary need help to “Thank a Veteran.” Following Havdallah, at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 9, the groups have organized a “Make a Star” party.
Stars will be cut from American flags that have been retired and can no longer be flown. The stars will be placed in small clear plastic Baggies with a special message. They will be given to veterans and first responders, thanking them for their service.

Chabad Hanukkah events

Chabad of Arlington and the Mid-Cities will hold two Hanukkah events. At 6:30 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 17, Southlake Mayor Laura Hill will light the Hanukkah Torch at Southlake Town Square. Among the festivities will be a live sculpture of an ice menorah, a fire show, doughnuts and latkes.
At 6:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 18, Chabad will “Light up the Night” at Arlington City Hall. In addition to lighting the Star of David menorah, there will be a “fill the dreidel” toy drive to benefit Israeli victims of terrorist attacks.

Daytimers Hanukkah party is Dec. 20

The December gathering of the Daytimers, at noon, Wednesday, Dec. 20, will feature Genie Long. Along with pianist Brad Volk, Long will present a Hanukkah music program. Bring a brown bag lunch and enjoy jelly-filled doughnut holes, coffee, tea and snacks provided by the Daytimers. There will be a slide show and videos of previous Daytimers get-togethers. To make a reservation, contact Larry Steckler at 817-927-2736.
Daytimers is a program of Beth-El Congregation with financial support from the Jewish Federation.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

View or Subscribe to the
Texas Jewish Post

Advertise Here

Photos from our Flickr stream

See all photos

Advertise Here