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Dallas Doings: Shabbat together, Christmas mitzvah

Dallas Doings: Shabbat together, Christmas mitzvah

Posted on 18 January 2018 by admin

Photo: Steve Krant JWV and JWV Auxiliary volunteers posed beneath the large American flag in the VA’s atrium after a job well done! The JWV Post 256 assembled and delivered more than 200 gift bags to patients at the VA on Christmas Day.

Photo: Steve Krant
JWV and JWV Auxiliary volunteers posed beneath the large American flag in the VA’s atrium after a job well done! The JWV Post 256 assembled and delivered more than 200 gift bags to patients at the VA on Christmas Day.

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Shabbat Together for your Munchkin

Temple Shalom Munchkin Minyan will convene Shabbat Together for the first time this year, at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 19. The program always includes singing, dancing, story time and challah.
Saturday morning programs add a delicious child-friendly oneg. For more information contact Jen Arndt and Michelle Falk, Young Family co-chairs, at youngfamilies@templeshalomdallas.org. Additional dates are 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 17; 6 p.m. Friday, March 16; 10:20 a.m. Saturday, April 21; and 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 19.
All families with children ages 6 and under are welcome.
— Submitted by Lisa Rothberg

JWV’s Christmas mitzvah

Christmas Day morning found more than 30 members and family of JWV Harvey J. Bloom Post 256 and its Ladies Auxiliary volunteering at the Dallas VA Medical Center.
The group was on a mission to bring cheer to veterans hospitalized during the holidays. Many have little or no family to keep them company on Christmas Day. JWV’s volunteers bring each veteran a gift bag stocked with snacks, wearables, stationery and other useful items — many donated by local merchants. Perhaps most importantly, they bring a smiling face and some conversation to brighten their day.
More than 200 gift bags were distributed to patients, as well as to families at Fisher House — a nearby facility, similar to Ronald McDonald House, offering free temporary lodging to families while their loved ones undergo medical treatment.

 

 

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Diamonds and Dice

Congregation Anshai Torah recently celebrated and honored Stuart Blaugrund, one of its founding members, a devoted supporter, amazing adviser and good friend.
— Submitted by Deb Silverthorn

 (Left to right) Melanie, Michael Kerner, Stuart Blaugrund, Bari Golin-Blaugrund, Louann Leeds-Pranses and Emily Blaugrund Fox

(Left to right) Melanie, Michael Kerner, Stuart Blaugrund, Bari Golin-Blaugrund, Louann Leeds-Pranses and Emily Blaugrund Fox

(Back row, left to right) Brad Welcher, Debbie Cohn, Gretchen Edwards, Harvey Swento, Amy Gross, Shawn Frank and Cynthia Brooks; (front row) Bethany Last, Kim Velevis, Jennifer Hersh, and Kimberly Mabel

(Back row, left to right) Brad Welcher, Debbie Cohn, Gretchen Edwards, Harvey Swento, Amy Gross, Shawn Frank and Cynthia Brooks; (front row) Bethany Last, Kim Velevis, Jennifer Hersh, and Kimberly Mabel

 

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Dallas Doings: Ever wonder how ONE Night came about?

Dallas Doings: Ever wonder how ONE Night came about?

Posted on 11 January 2018 by admin

Stephanie and Dan Prescott with Seth Meyers, the featured performer at ONE Night 2016

Stephanie and Dan Prescott with Seth Meyers, the featured performer at ONE Night 2016

Dan Prescott with Jim Gaffigan, who brought down the house at ONE Night 2017

Dan Prescott with Jim Gaffigan, who brought down the house at ONE Night 2017

Prescott explains origins of event

By Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Excitement is building for the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas’ ONE Night, Sunday, Jan. 28. This year’s event will feature hilarious comedian Howie Mandel with musical guests the Maccabeats. For the third year, SMU’s beautiful McFarlin Auditorium will be the backdrop for this not-to-miss free (there is a minimum suggested pledge to the Federation) community event (doors open at 6:30; the program starts at 7:30). Having attended my fair share of Federation Women’s Events, I wondered how ONE Night evolved. I caught up with Dan Prescott, who was the sitting Federation board chair two years ago when ONE Night debuted.
TJP: What was the inspiration for having one fundraising event for the community?
DP: There were a few reasons:

  • 1. Fundraising is important and needs to happen but there is no reason it can’t be fun and enjoyable.
  • 2. We have so many factors in our world that try to divide us, to create rifts and split us by age, by gender, by religious affiliation and brand, and isn’t it nice when we can find reasons to join together, to create one strong vibrant community and show how strong and successful we can be and how wonderful when across our demographic we can pull together.
  • 3. Partners wanted events they can attend together.

TJP: How do you decide on the talent?
DP: I thought there is enough in the news and on the airwaves that makes us concerned and sigh, comedy is a break. Also with comedians no one is excluded; Reform, Conservative, Orthodox all can attend.
TJP: What have you learned from the previous two events?
DP: They are not easy and people have significant expectations. People like SMU, and profanity is not necessary. We learned that it takes a village to get the word out and for folks to sign up. Also that each year we learn from the previous year’s efforts.
We are learning to make our case more impactful and our asks more effective.
TJP: Do you think men and women miss having an event to call their own?
DP: Maybe and they may come back at some point. These events have shelf lives. Men’s and Women’s events got a little tired. That said, I can see a time when they will come back. It is interesting how other communities are following our lead. Dallas leads on so many things.
TJP: It seems like everyone is doing a comedy show now. Do you think this is a trend?
DP: Don’t know but if it is, we started it! Comedy, as long as it is at no one’s real expense, is needed in this world. Especially during these troubling times.
There is still time to register for ONE Night at www.jewishdallas.org/onenight. This event is free to attend thanks to the generous support of underwriters and presenting sponsor, BB&T.
As this is the largest fundraising event for the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, attendees will have the opportunity to make their commitment to the 2018 Annual Campaign. Attendees 31 years of age and older will be asked to make a suggested minimum pledge of $365. Attendees 30 years of age and under will be asked to make a suggested minimum pledge of $180 to the 2018 Annual Campaign.
Event chairs for the evening are Angela Aaron Horowitz and Doug French, Jolie and Michael Newman and Natalie and Michael Waldman.

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Dallas Doings: New chapter for men’s book club: women

Dallas Doings: New chapter for men’s book club: women

Posted on 04 January 2018 by admin

Group renamed to Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Bob Weinfeld is turning the pages of his Guys’ Night Out book club to a new chapter that not only invites, but also always includes women to participate. The group is now called the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club.
The all-inclusive group will welcome author Chuck Friedman, author of Just Call Me Mr. Lucky: An Ethical Will Entwined in an Autobiography, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 16, at the Aaron Family JCC.

(left to right)  Jerry Levin, Bob Weinfeld, Ken Parker, founded the Guys’ Night Out Book of the Month Club with the late Fred Fisher (far left). The club, which meets at the Aaron Family JCC has been renamed the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club.

(left to right) Jerry Levin, Bob Weinfeld, Ken Parker, founded the Guys’ Night Out Book of the Month Club with the late Fred Fisher (far left). The club, which meets at the Aaron Family JCC has been renamed the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club.

“We Jews are the ‘People of the Book,’ the men and women too, and we’re excited to include — and we look forward to having — the ‘gals’ join us on a regular basis. This has been a great group since 2002 and I know it can only get better,” said Weinfeld, program organizer. “It will be wonderful to hear their reviews and discussions.”
The new schedule begins with first-time author Chuck Friedman sharing his Just Call Me Mr. Lucky; An Ethical Will Entwined in an Autobiography. The book, which began as notes to his family, including sons Gus and Paul and his three granddaughters — to whom he dedicated the book — morphed into a bound bounty of advice and lessons he’s learned in his 80-plus years.
Friedman calls himself “lucky,” sharing life for 55 years with wife Ety and their sons. Enjoying good health and magnificent experiences along with both failures and successes during three different careers, the Minnesota native started as an engineer, then went from investor to president and CEO of Information Dynamics Corporation, then became a real estate professional, forming Bachman Construction Company. Looking back on it all, he put pen to paper to create an ethical will. What ensued, and the process of publishing the tome, has made for more memories.
“There’s a million books published this year and mine is one — that’s something,” said Friedman, who along with his wife has been a member of Congregation Shearith Israel for 50 years. “I wrote about how I hoped my family would live, what I’ve tried to do, and to teach them something about living a proper good life. I thought the lessons could help others too.”
It was Marlene and Fred Fisher, of blessed memory, who suggested to Weinfeld the idea of a men’s book club — something women in the community were already enjoying. Put a bug in Weinfeld’s ear and be sure he’ll act with even the slightest plan in sight.

Chuck Friedman, here with wife Ety, is the featured speaker at the first – now revised edition – to include women, of the now “titled” Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club at the Aaron Family JCC on Jan. 16.

Chuck Friedman, here with wife Ety, is the featured speaker at the first – now revised edition – to include women, of the now “titled” Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club at the Aaron Family JCC on Jan. 16.

“I thought it was a great idea and in a couple of weeks Fred, Jerry Levin, Ken Parker and I met and off we were,” said Weinfeld. “We started with Seabiscuit and haven’t stopped reading, covering 175 books.”
“Bob’s a magnet and anything he’s involved in is successful. I love walking by the meetings where you can hear the enthusiasm. It’s one more way the J opens its doors for learning, connections and community building — it’s what we’re about,” said Artie Allen, the J’s CEO. “The more inclusive, the better and we’re thrilled to have more people coming through our doors.”
For Myra Fischel, whose husband Bert has participated in the club for years, opening the gateway for the ladies is exciting. “The guys have always had a good time and whenever we’re invited, it’s been enjoyable,” she said, noting she and Bert are considering reviewing a book together. “I think we might lighten it up a little, but I like that we’ll be introduced to books we maybe wouldn’t otherwise appreciate.”
That the club is multigenerational — with Jews from all congregations and the unaffiliated too — is another positive for Fischel. “It’s nice to meet new people,” she said. “Bob is a super planner with more energy than anyone I know. If he’s leading the trail, it’s going to be a good ride.”
Brenda Nibert, who’s known Weinfeld for a while but never attended the programs, echoes that he’s a “dynamo and everything he plans is a success.” His record intact, at The Legacy at Willow Bend, where Weinfeld is dubbed “the Mayor,” he founded an in-house book club and that facility’s library, now with thousands of rotating books. “I’ve been involved in many areas of the community, including other book clubs as I love to read constantly, but I’m looking forward to whatever Bob instigates,” Nibert added.
The Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club events are open to the public and free of charge, with each review and discussion sweetened with socialization and snacks. For more information, email Bob Weinfeld at robert.weinfeld@tx.rr.com.

 

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2018 schedule

Feb. 20: A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order and World Order
March 20: The Life and Afterlife of a Jazz Legend, Bix Beiderbecke

Dallas resident and first-time author Chuck Friedman will share his Just Call Me Mr. Lucky; An Ethical Will Entwined in an Autobiography at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 16, at the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club at the Aaron Family JCC.

Dallas resident and first-time author Chuck Friedman will share his Just Call Me Mr. Lucky; An Ethical Will Entwined in an Autobiography at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 16, at the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club at the Aaron Family JCC.

April 17: Lucky Bastard: My Life, My Dad, and the Things I’m Not Allowed to Say on TV
June 19: Schmucks: Our Favorite Fakes, Frauds, Lowlifes and Liars
July 17: The Mind of Egypt: History and Meaning in the Time of the Pharaohs (a melding of fiction and nonfiction titles)
Titles for Aug. 21, Oct. 16, and Nov. 20 are to be announced, and there are no meetings in May, September and December.
While most events are hosted at the JCC, there is discussion of occasional programs to be held at The Legacy at Willow Bend.

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Sisterhoods invite Repp to tell his story

Sisterhoods invite Repp to tell his story

Posted on 27 December 2017 by admin

Holocaust survivor will discuss book at Jan. 7 luncheon

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Reflection, reconnections, and the relishing of friendships new and old are certain at the 2018 IntraFaith Sisterhood Brunch. This year’s luncheon will be hosted by Temple Emanu-El’s Women of Reform Judaism at 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 7, and catered by Simcha Kosher Catering. The featured speaker will be community member and author Jack Repp.

Photo: Deb Silverthorn Jack Repp will speak at the 2018 IntraFaith Sisterhood Brunch at Temple Emanu-El. Repp (center), here with event Honorary Chair Sarah Yarrin, has told the story of his life in his recently published Dreams & Jealousy, his story as told to Rabbi Dan Lewin (right).

Photo: Deb Silverthorn
Jack Repp will speak at the 2018 IntraFaith Sisterhood Brunch at Temple Emanu-El. Repp (center), here with event Honorary Chair Sarah Yarrin, has told the story of his life in his recently published Dreams & Jealousy, his story as told to Rabbi Dan Lewin (right).

“Sisterhoods across the country connect, advocate, and act and Temple Emanu-El’s WRJ couldn’t be more thrilled to host this year’s gathering,” said Celia Rose Saunders, co-chairing the event with Elise Mikus and Sue Weiner and Honorary Chair Sarah Yarrin. The co-chairs are excited that the event is open to both women and men (ages 15 and over), hoping to see the generations represented.
“Everything that Sisterhood stands for is meaningful and to have Jack Repp as our guest, a man we honor, admire and really love so dearly, here to share his own story that is so important, is a gift to us all,” Saunders said. “We’ve opened the event to men and women and to teens, and we’re bringing in Simcha Kosher Catering hoping those from all the congregations, and those who are unaffiliated as well, will join us together — as one — as Jews — to experience and strengthen what we know as community.”
Each Sisterhood IntraFaith Luncheon, this one the 15th annual affair, is hosted by a different Dallas-area congregation, bringing together the members of the sisterhoods of all branches of Judaism. The women of each chapter create the program and menu, and coordinate the afternoon with previous event themes related to cooking, the environment, the history of Jews in Texas, the arts, career planning and more.
“Sisterhood is about our heritage and an incredible forum for friendships and connections at the many ages and stages of life,” said Rachelle Weiss Crane, who serves as Temple Emanu-El WRJ co-president with Kay Schachter. “The relationships that are built are treasures and the platforms of issues, of youth, education, social action, world Jewry and more cross the lines of the branches of Judaism and are concerns to all of us as Jews, as women and as Jewish women.”
Repp, known for speaking to groups large and small throughout the community, will reflect on his experiences during the Holocaust as shared through the publication of his book Dreams & Jealousy; The Story of Holocaust Survivor Jack Repp as told to Dan Lewin. After his lecture and a question-and-answer session, Repp will sign copies of his book, available on Amazon and which will also be sold at the event.
“I started my life as Itzik Rzepkowicz in Radom, Poland and now I get to tell my story to children and adults, in schools and in museums, and here in the temple that I love,” said Repp, who is excited about speaking to the intrafaith sisterhood audience, and this the rare occasion for men to share in the celebration. “I am so glad that this program is open to everyone in the community. To me, if you believe in God, you are a religious person and it isn’t about Reform or Conservative or Orthodox. I was born twice — once to my parents, and once again when I was 15 and instead of going to the crematorium, I went to the other line. God has watched over me all my life and everything to do with Him has turned my life in a positive direction.”
Repp’s struggle and survival are the focus of the book that tells his story. Just 69 pounds and 99.9 percent dead when liberated, he is grateful — and amazed — to have still had his mind. “I’m not educated but I can recall 70 years ago like this morning — my marbles are working. At 94 years young, I don’t want to get old,” said the 44-year-long business owner who has remained in the same house for 58 years — always resilient, with one foot forward moving after the next. “You must depend on God. He works in mysterious ways. I want people should know the truth, accept what happened, and do their part so it doesn’t happen again.”
Immigrating to Greenville, Texas, where he had family, Jack and his wife Esther (later known as Edna), of blessed memory, raised their family: children Lotty (Peter) Casillas, David (Bobbie) and Stan (Marsha), four grandchildren and recently — a first great-grandchild.
“Jack’s done it all. He’s been a merchant, a smuggler, a spy, and a survivor and he makes lemonade out of lemons like no one I know,” said Yarrin, a past-president of Temple Emanu-El’s WRJ. “To have him speak at Temple, where I’ve belonged since 1946 and he since 1949, a place that is truly my ‘home away from home,’ is so exciting. WRJ makes a huge difference to so many and supports so many and I just love that he’s coming to speak at a program of those who serve the community. It’s what he’s done for so long on his own — and now, we come together. It’s going to be just beautiful and very, very meaningful.”
RSVPs by Dec. 29 are appreciated for the luncheon. Tickets are $20 per person and can be purchased online at tesisterhood.org/brunch or by calling 469-230-5195.

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Cycling for awareness, research and a cure

Cycling for awareness, research and a cure

Posted on 27 December 2017 by admin

Wheel to Survive returns Feb. 18

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Be The Difference Foundation’s Wheel to Survive participants are racing with thousands of supporters and founders.
The sixth Wheel to Survive returns from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18, at the Aaron Family JCC. Practice rides are underway. The force behind the $2 million donated since the wheels began spinning has been a fearsome foursome: Jill Bach, Lynn Lentscher, Julie Shrell and the late Helen Gardner.

The 2017 Wheel to Survive had 380 riders and raised over $336,000, allowing the organization to give away its 2-millionth dollar this year. Registration is open for the Feb. 18, 2018 ride at the Aaron Family JCC.

The 2017 Wheel to Survive had 380 riders and raised over $336,000, allowing the organization to give away its 2-millionth dollar this year. Registration is open for the Feb. 18, 2018 ride at the Aaron Family JCC.

Jill Bach, a wife and mother of two who’ll celebrate 11 years of survivorship in April, was 44 when what she thought was just a cough lasted six weeks. Expecting bronchitis, her world was rocked when X-rays showed an obscured image of her left lung, revealing nodules. A biopsy and PET scan confirmed an extensive disease, most likely stage 4 ovarian cancer.
“Given the statistics I felt I survived for a reason and that was Be The Difference Foundation,” said Bach, who inherited the BRCA1 mutation. Her father had no knowledge he was a carrier before being tested himself.
Now a retired president and founder of a web development and interactive agency, Bach worked through her illness. Blogging a form of self-therapy and communication, her work and family schedule kept her feeling healthy.
Lynn Lentscher, a wife, mother of three and grandmother of three, is a retired real estate and title professional. At 53, the athletic picture-of-health woman experienced painful and prolonged diarrhea. After palpating a mass and an elevated CA125 test, Lentscher who’d previously had a hysterectomy, agreed to have her ovaries removed. She woke up to a stage 3 diagnosis. After six months of chemo, a second-look surgery showing more cancer, there was more chemo, then radiation. She endured a year of treatments and 11 years of associated issues. Now she is 18 years ovarian cancer-free.
“I prayed for survival, but also that if I survived I’d know my purpose. I understood the importance of offering hope,” Lentscher said. “The stars aligned, the four of us met and we were strong and courageous.”
Julie Shrell’s paternal grandmother had breast cancer twice — three decades apart. After her ovarian cancer diagnosis, at 48, BRCA1 testing proved positive, her family history revealed.
“There’s a lot about ovarian cancer symptoms that people don’t recognize,” said Shrell, a senior residential mortgage loan officer, married and the mother of three. “I had classic symptoms and some lesser-known, but never imagined they were a big deal. I was wrong.
“It’s funny that I hardly remember life before cancer,” Shrell said, adding that she’d focused on work and the “Mom thing.”
“I still do those things but with more intention.”
Helen Gardner, of blessed memory, was a 55-year-young wife and mother of three when she died Aug. 20, 2014. Gardner researched and sought life-extending treatments, making the most of her life. Her family is still dedicated to the Foundation as husband Gary remains on the board of directors.

Jill Bach, the late Helen Gardner, Lynn Lentscher, and Julie Shrell, founders of the Be The Difference Foundation, have shared the $2 million mark of money donated for research toward a cure for ovarian cancer. Their 2018 Wheel to Survive will take place on Feb. 18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Aaron Family JCC in Dallas.

Jill Bach, the late Helen Gardner, Lynn Lentscher, and Julie Shrell, founders of the Be The Difference Foundation, have shared the $2 million mark of money donated for research toward a cure for ovarian cancer. Their 2018 Wheel to Survive will take place on Feb. 18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Aaron Family JCC in Dallas.

About 1.3 percent of all women will develop ovarian cancer. For those with inherited gene mutations, 39 percent of women with the BRCA1 mutation and 11 to 17 percent who inherit the BRCA2 mutation, will develop ovarian cancer by age 70. The likelihood that breast and ovarian cancers are associated with these genes is highest in families with histories of multiple cases of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, where one or more family members have two primary cancers, ovarian cancer at any age, or those of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. When detected and treated early, the five-year survival rate of ovarian cancer is greater than 92 percent. With vague symptoms, and late diagnosis, only 50 percent live that long.
Making sure women find and get to treatments is the goal of the Lazarex Foundation, one of BTDF’s beneficiaries. Unique in providing assistance for FDA clinical trial participation, airfare, parking, tolls, housing, additional medical testing and the identification of trial options, they’ve helped 3000-plus patients.

Photo: Be The Difference Foundation Riding in her fifth Wheel to Survive, Linda Bezner, Dallas’ 2018 chair (center) at the 2017 ride, with her son Cole and sisters-in-law Nancy Lesch (left) and Janet Bezner. Linda’s team, “A Positive Spin,” rides in her honor, as she is a three-time ovarian cancer survivor whose first diagnosis came after a complete hysterectomy. “I had no ovaries — NO ovaries — but I am celebrating being a 14-year survivor from the first time of diagnosis and as a five-year survivor of the third,” she said. “I don’t know how anyone that learns about the wonderful things that Be the Difference and Wheel to Survive are doing could not be impressed.”

Photo: Be The Difference Foundation
Riding in her fifth Wheel to Survive, Linda Bezner, Dallas’ 2018 chair (center) at the 2017 ride, with her son Cole and sisters-in-law Nancy Lesch (left) and Janet Bezner. Linda’s team, “A Positive Spin,” rides in her honor, as she is a three-time ovarian cancer survivor whose first diagnosis came after a complete hysterectomy. “I had no ovaries — NO ovaries — but I am celebrating being a 14-year survivor from the first time of diagnosis and as a five-year survivor of the third,” she said. “I don’t know how anyone that learns about the wonderful things that Be the Difference and Wheel to Survive are doing could not be impressed.”

“Be The Difference impacted 15 of this year’s patients — their $35,000 earmarked for ovarian cancer patients, that need surpassed months ago. We continue clinical trial navigations, expense reimbursements, paying for someone to accompany the patient — it all adds up,” said Program Services Coordinator Erin Miller, whose husband Mike was diagnosed in 2003 with pancreatic cancer. Mike, and Erin’s sister Dana, searched for options and Mike lived another 19 months and Dana founded Lazarex to help others. “We’ve been there. Our path allows us to help others find time and some peace.”
In 2016, rides in Austin, South Florida, Houston, Lubbock and Northern California’s Bay Area, directed by Jon Mize, also supported Clearity Foundation, Gynecology Research Lab at the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, Mary Crowley Cancer Research Center, MD Anderson’s Ovarian Cancer Moon Shots Program, and the Ovarian Cancer Research Center at the University of Pennsylvania.
Bach, Lentscher, and Shrell volunteer at UT Southwestern and Survivors Teaching Students, speaking to patients and helping medical students see cancer not only as statistics, but a journey of human survival.
“We’re serving survivors and others touched but there’s more to do. We need to share more stories, find early diagnostic testing, better treatments and a cure,” said Lentscher. “We want to, we will, Be The Difference!”
The ladies look forward to a future when ovarian cancer is a chronic disease with lifesaving treatments, ultimately hoping for a cure. Until then, their mission is to support and provide hope for women fighting the disease. Hope is the drive, keeping their wheels spinning.
Fore more information, email wts@bethedifferencefoundation.org or visit www.bethedifferencefoundation.org for Wheel to Survive 2018 registration. Use promotional code “TJP” for $10 discounted registration.

 

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Dallas Doings: JBA party, new NJHS members, JCC Matzoh Ball

Dallas Doings: JBA party, new NJHS members, JCC Matzoh Ball

Posted on 21 December 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

JBA holds annual holiday party, makes donations

Jewish Business Alliance, a business networking organization, held its annual holiday luncheon Dec. 14 at The Legacy Willow Bend. Each year JBA contributes to local Jewish-based organizations from funds that the group has raised over the course of the year.
This year, contributions were presented to StandWithUS (Jesse Stock accepting), Jewish Family Service (Jamie Dennison accepting) and Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas (Gary Wolff accepting). These are amazing organizations that really make a difference in our community.

Photo: JBA Jewish Business Alliance gathered Dec. 4 at The Legacy Willow Bend for its annual holiday luncheon. Jewish Family Service, Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas and StandWithUs were beneficiaries of funds raised by JBA this year.

Photo: JBA
Jewish Business Alliance gathered Dec. 4 at The Legacy Willow Bend for its annual holiday luncheon. Jewish Family Service, Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas and StandWithUs were beneficiaries of funds raised by JBA this year.

Now in its seventh year, JBA was founded by Mark Lowey, owner of Stonebridge Insurance Group, and Jay Levine, owner of Energy Brokers of America. JBA meets on the second and fourth Thursdays of every month at the Coffee House Cafe in North Dallas.
For more information on the group or membership, please contact Mark at 214-558-2727 or mark@marklowey.com.

Levine Academy’s newest NJHS members

On Monday, Dec. 11, following morning services, Levine Academy inducted seven middle school students into the National Junior Honors Society. After the ceremony, a short reception with parents, Levine staff and friends was held.
The newest NJHS members are eighth-graders Joey Spiro (son of Dr. Susanna Khavul and Dr. Stephen Spiro), Noa Ksabi (daughter of Avivit and Moses Ksabi), Eva Lemeshev (daughter of Drs. Jodi and Yan Lemeshev), Rebecca Hoffman (daughter of Jackie and Michael Hoffman), Mia Files (daughter of Dr. Debra Weinberger and Dr. Steve Files) and Davi Hopkovitz (daughter of Andrea and Michael Hopkovitz); and seventh-grader Ava Stern (daughter of Lori and Adam Stern).

JCC Matzoh Ball heads to Uptown

On Dec. 24, the Aaron Family JCC will host the 38th Annual Matzoh Ball. The Matzoh Ball is the J’s annual event with the goal of engaging the Dallas young adult community on Christmas Eve. The 2017 Matzoh Ball will take place Sunday from 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. at Theory Uptown on McKinney Avenue, 2912 McKinney Ave. The night will be filled with l’chaims, fun photos, and dancing while providing a place for the 20s and 30s to hang out together.
Event chairs are Nace Allen, Bari Beilinson, Kirby Bennett and Jonathan Itzhakov. Tickets are $25 or $30 at the door and can be purchased at http://bit.ly/2yYBrJd. For more information, contact Karli Ward at 214-377-1724 or kward@jccdallas.org.
The TJP is the media sponsor of this year’s Matzoh Ball.

Save the date: March 22, 2018

The Jewish Community Relations Council will hold its sixth annual Interfaith Seder at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 22, at Congregation Shearith Israel. This event has grown exponentially each year. The Seder will be led this year by Congregation Beth Torah Rabbi Elana Zelony and Bishop of the Catholic Diocese Most Reverend Edward J. Burns.

News and notes

Earlier this month, Josh Goldberg, son of Cyndi Heller and Marshal Goldberg of Dallas, released his first music video, Hashkiveinu.
Check it out at https://vimeo.com/245066485.

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Dallas Doings: Knitting group hosts event

Dallas Doings: Knitting group hosts event

Posted on 14 December 2017 by admin

 Officer Eli Herrera

Officer Eli Herrera

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Legacy knitting group hosts annual distribution event

Throughout the year, residents of The Legacy Willow Bend, Plano’s only life care retirement community, look for ways to help those in need. As the holiday season approaches, they believe it is especially important to make a difference.
Recently, The Ladies of The Legacy Willow Bend, the community’s knitting group, donated 3,000 items they knitted or crocheted to various local organizations. The group has created more than 17,000 pieces since its inception, and the distribution event is a much-anticipated yearly tradition. At the event, the groups accepting the donations spoke individually about how the items serve others. The event took place at The Legacy Willow Bend, and representatives from the following groups accepted donations at the event:

The Ladies of Legacy Willow Bend has created more than 17,000 pieces since its inception.

The Ladies of Legacy Willow Bend has created more than 17,000 pieces since its inception.

  • Dallas Police Department
  • Girl Scouts Troop #953: allotment to Dallas CASA, TOM’s and Communities in Schools
  • Hope’s Door
  • International Refugee Committee and Pebbles Apartments
  • Jewish Family Service
  • Plano Police Department
  • Streetside Showers
  • Vickery Meadow Food Pantry and Clothes Closet
  • Christ United Methodist Church
  • Cochran Chapel United Methodist Church

“Through the volunteer program here at The Legacy Willow Bend, residents can give back and make a difference for others in the local community,” said Rivae Campo, volunteer coordinator. “We take pride in supporting other not-for-profit organizations, as we understand that it takes a group effort to positively impact the lives of those in need. The Ladies of The Legacy Willow Bend are nothing short of remarkable, and we are humbled by their dedication to give back.”

 Public Safety Officer Kevin Lemon, Officer David Tilley

Public Safety Officer Kevin Lemon, Officer David Tilley

The Ladies of The Legacy Willow Bend work on their precious projects throughout the year by knitting and crocheting hats, washcloths, scarves and children’s blankets. For the past eight years, the group has remained steadfast in its commitment to provide articles of clothing to the area homeless and families in need. For volunteer Sonia Goodman, supporting the group’s efforts reminds her of the blessings she has received and provides her with the opportunity to share them with others.
“It’s incredibly fulfilling to provide someone with an item that you’ve made with your own hands,” said Goodman. “What has been accomplished by the group is astounding when you start to think about it, and it’s incredible to imagine the impact made on so many lives. Over the years we’ve received remarkable support from all across the state through yarn donations, and it’s amazing to think of all the people who had a hand in making what we do possible. We hope that our efforts inspire others to think about ways they can make a difference.”
“It’s an honor to have people like The Ladies of The Legacy Willow Bend as a part of our community,” said Laura Levy, executive director of The Legacy Willow Bend. “The group’s efforts are heartwarming and a reminder of true generosity. We are proud to support them in their endeavor to give back to those in need in the greater community.”

(Back row, from left) Carol Sobaol, Laura Levy, Rivae Campo, Officer David Tilley, Peggy and David Millheiser; (front row) Helen Wunsch, Dottie Lombardi, Ruth Altman

(Back row, from left) Carol Sobaol, Laura Levy, Rivae Campo, Officer David Tilley, Peggy and David Millheiser; (front row) Helen Wunsch, Dottie Lombardi, Ruth Altman

If you are interested in supporting The Ladies of The Legacy Willow Bend in their work and would like to donate yarn, they prefer to work with all colors, including variegated and mixed colors. They also prefer medium worsted weight yarn over bulky or baby yarn. Donations to the group may be dropped off with the concierge at the front desk.
—  Submitted by Sarah Jackson on behalf of The Legacy Willow Bend

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Dallas Doings: TTI scholarship banquet, Women of Valor

Dallas Doings: TTI scholarship banquet, Women of Valor

Posted on 07 December 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

TTI to hold 14th scholarship banquet

Texas Torah Institute, the yeshiva of Dallas, will celebrate its 14th annual scholarship banquet on Dec. 17, 2017.
The event promises to be another night to remember. Back for an encore performance is Sruli Subar Inc. A renowned East Coast kosher caterer, Subar is famous for his extraordinary culinary abilities and artistic flair. This year’s event will be held in the upscale Vouv-Meeting and Event Center.
The yeshiva will use the evening to reflect back on 14 years in Dallas. It is a chance to bridge the past with the future. Guests of honor, Brian and Susan Wertheim, are two of TTI’s first and longest supporters — connected with the school since its earliest days, when it was housed in the building of Congregation Ohev Shalom.
Zak and Chanie Klein, the Young Leadership awardees, represent the important role that the younger generation is playing in carrying the yeshiva and the whole community into the future. Part of the huge influx of younger families to the North Eruv in recent years, the Kleins are known and loved by all, young and old alike. Zak is a current board member of TTI and the treasurer of Ohev Shalom.
The final honorees are Meshulem and Shaina Novoseller. This year’s Alumnus of the Year, Meshulem came to Dallas as a teenager to attend the yeshiva, and forged relationships that still flourish. He has stayed connected in the years since graduation, through his marriage to Shaina and the birth of their two children. TTI and its alumni are proud to be represented by the Novosellers, and are eager to introduce the community to the wonderful products of a TTI education.
Dinner reservations can be made at TexasTorah.org or by calling the office at 972-250-4888.
— Submitted by Rabbi Daniel Ringelheim

Temple Shalom 2018 Woman of Valor

On Wednesday, Oct. 25, Staci Romick Mendelsohn was named Temple Shalom Sisterhood’s 2018 Woman of Valor (WOV). This unforgettable evening began with the Temple Shalom Sisterhood Paid Up Dinner. Guests enjoyed a delicious meal prepared by Catering by Ed. The highlight of the evening was a fantastic panel of speakers: Jill Cumnock, Ronald McDonald House, CEO; Lisa Brodsky, CHAI House, CEO; Mary O’Conner, O’Conner & Advisors, LLC, President; and Cathy Barker, Jewish Family Service, COO/CDO!

(From left) Ann Weintraub, Cathy Barker, Mary O’Conner, Stacey Segal, Jill Cumnock and Lisa Brodsky

(From left) Ann Weintraub, Cathy Barker, Mary O’Conner, Stacey Segal, Jill Cumnock and Lisa Brodsky

During this Wonder Woman theme inspired evening, panelists shared pearls of wisdom about leadership and success including: “Make sure to network,” “Be a great listener.” “Do what others won’t do, so you can have what they don’t have,” “Follow your passion,” and “Follow the road less traveled.” These amazing wonder women credited their success to parents, spouses, mentors and even the amazing parents that they come in contact with who are surviving everyday struggles.
Keo Strull, Sisterhood’s 2017 WOV honoree, shared “clues as to the identity of this year’s recipient.” “She is a Texas girl, born and raised in Dallas. She has been a member of Temple Shalom her entire life. She is married to her college sweetheart, and they have two children. She played club soccer at the University of Texas, as a defender. This explains her passion as a soccer mom with her daughter….”
Staci is a past Sisterhood president following in the footsteps of her mom, Lynn Romick, of blessed memory, who was also a Sisterhood president at Temple Shalom.
Plans are in the works for the the Woman of Valor celebration on April 15, 2018, at the Renaissance Dallas Richardson Hotel. For more information, contact Ali Rhodes at ali.rhodes18@gmail.com. or Gail Davidson at onekidmama@gmail.com.
— Submitted by Lisa Rothberg

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JFGD launches new grant opportunities

JFGD launches new grant opportunities

Posted on 07 December 2017 by admin

The Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas has rolled out restructured supplemental grant opportunities. In an effort to address new and increased needs in the Jewish community, these grants will enable partner and non-partner agencies to continue to focus on providing quality services and programs while also providing opportunities for innovation. Formerly known as Community Impact Grants and Outreach and Engagement Grants, Short- and Long-Term Grants were launched by the Federation on Dec. 6, for initiatives that address one of the Federation’s impact areas: education, social services, global and local responsibility, Jewish identity, outreach/engagement and security.

Submitted photo The J on Wheels, which travels around the Dallas area and provides J programming, is an example of a program funded through a Federation grant.

Submitted photo
The J on Wheels, which travels around the Dallas area and provides J programming, is an example of a program funded through a Federation grant.

“The Federation is excited to be enhancing our allocations process,” said Stefani Eisenstat, chair of the Planning and Allocations Committee. “Over the last 18 months, our planning committee identified a need to enhance our supplemental funding process to address emerging needs in our community as well as strengthen our support to current partner agencies. Our hope is that this simplified process continues to drive innovation and provide resources for our partners to focus on being excellent.”
Short-Term Grants will replace the former Outreach and Engagement Grants. These grants are available to all Jewish 501(c)3 organizations serving the greater Dallas area. The funds are for one-off programs and/or seed funding of a project. The duration should be no more than 12 to 18 months and the maximum funding request is $20,000. These grants will be offered annually.
Long-Term Grants will be available to current partner agencies that receive core funding from the Federation. These grants will enable partner agencies to address increased and new needs for their organizations as well as new, innovative programming. The grant funding will be from 18 months to a maximum of 3 years. The maximum funding request is $75,000. Similarly to other grant-making organizations in the Dallas area, the Federation will commit funding for the duration of the program, pending its performance, without the need for agencies to reapply annually.
Bradley Laye, president and CEO of the Federation, said, “Our responsibility to the community is to ensure its strength and vibrancy. This shift will help both partner and non-partner agencies address needs that didn’t exist 10 years ago and better serve members of the Dallas Jewish community. With our growth in campaign, we have had increasingly more dollars to allocate through our grants process. We look forward to continuing this expansion this year.” Grant applications are due Feb. 6, 2018 to Mercedes Deviney at mdeviney@jewishdallas.org. For more information on Short- and Long-Term Grants, please contact Sarah Golman at sgolman@jewishdallas.org or 214-615-5275.
— Submitted by Nina Stenzler

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Dallas Doings: Beth Torah, physician of year, more

Dallas Doings: Beth Torah, physician of year, more

Posted on 22 November 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Beth Torah Learning Center takes on student-led service

Chugim is Hebrew for “special projects” of all kinds. The 15 teens in Beth Torah’s Congregational Learning Center’s Chugim class took on — and pulled off! — an incredible project: They planned, cooked, served, and cleaned up after a special dinner preceding a student-led service on a recent Friday evening, using a menu they put together from many different Jewish sources!
Teacher Lynda Markowitz met with Chugim participants for the first segment of their regular classes each week to learn about the various cuisines; then the students put in extra time Sunday mornings and Wednesday and Thursday evenings to develop their menu and prepare everything in the synagogue’s kitchen.

Submitted photo Beth Torah Chugim teens prepare Shabbat dinner prior to their student-led service.

Submitted photo
Beth Torah Chugim teens prepare Shabbat dinner prior to their student-led service.

After the procedures used by many of today’s popular Food Network cooking show competitions, the students divided into two teams, identified by white and blue aprons, and gave them names: “Flour Power” for the first, “Bake It Up” for the second. Each Chugim teen had a lead role in preparing, serving, or introducing a menu item to the 90 at the dinner. Among attendees were the cooks’ parents and siblings, other Learning Center families, and all Learning Center teachers. Providing additional help with setup and cleanup were Congregation President Cyd Friedman, Board member Debbie Wills, Congregational Learning Center Director Beri Schwitzer, Learning Center Co-chairs Carlie Ross and Jessica Winter, and teacher Markowitz’ husband Jeff.

Submitted photo Beth Torah Chugim teens prepare Shabbat dinner prior to their student-led service.

Submitted photo
Beth Torah Chugim teens prepare Shabbat dinner prior to their student-led service.

The vegetarian dinner began with Shabbat blessings over small cups of grape juice and individual braided challahs at each round table. The first-course appetizer, also brought to each table, was hummus with pita and vegetables for dipping. A sumptuous buffet followed, featuring Brazilian cheese muffins, lentil/veggie-stuffed cabbage from Poland, Moroccan seven-vegetable couscous, Israeli salad and spice cookies, a Turkish eggplant and cheese casserole, maki and nigiri sushi from the Far East, Russian chocolate babka and familiar American fruits.
Students who made this very special project happen included seventh-graders Drew Gluckman, Joshua Kesner, Jack Koenigsberg, Madeline Miller, Ilana Rose, Rikki Silver and Noah Winter; eighth-graders Landon Cox, Marissa Kohn, Farrah Montoya and Jaden Portnoy; and ninth-graders Dylan Rose, Asher Rosen, Millie Rowe, and Hannah and Miriam Schwitzer. Mazal Tov and Yasher Koach to all!
— Submitted by Harriet Gross

Noah Appel named Presby Dallas 2017 Physician of Year

Mazal tov to Noah B. Appel, M.D., radiology/vascular and interventional radiologist, who was voted Texas Health Presbyterian of Dallas 2017 Physician of the Year Nov. 14. Appel received both his undergraduate and medical doctor degrees from Washington University in St. Louis. He did his residency in diagnostic radiology at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology in St. Louis and completed a fellowship in vascular and interventional radiology there as well.
In 2003, Noah and his wife Gila Rosenstock Appel moved to Dallas with their family when he joined the group which ultimately became Radiology Associates of North Texas. Since June 2014, he has served as the chairman and medical director of the Department of Radiology at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas. In January 2017, he was named medical staff president-elect. His duties as medical staff president will begin Jan. 1, 2018.

Appel

Appel

The Appels are members of Congregation Shearith Israel and the parents of Daniela, 17, Ari, 14 and Gabriela, 11.

New officers for Hebrew Order of David

On Sunday, Nov. 13, 2017, the Shimon Perez Lodge of the Hebrew Order of David inducted its new officers. It was a wonderful event shared by the Brothers of the lodge, wives and national and international executive representatives of this noble order. Worthy Brother David Joss, North American Governing Lodge president, presided over the event. Worthy Brother Mario Oves, the vice president of the Governing Lodge of North America, came in from Atlanta. Worthy Brother Avron Krasner, president of the Governing Lodge of South Africa, traveled 6,000 miles for the ceremony.
The inducted executive board officers are Jeff Romick,  president, Ivan Kahn, vice president; Gary Bonner, immediate past president; Matt Kurtzman, secretary; Joel Cane, treasurer; Martin Berk, master of ceremonies; Jeff Levitt, preceptor; and Warren Harmel, — scribe. Jeff Romick and Gary Bonner shared success stories of the past year. HOD focuses on service to the community and fostering brotherhood among the members of the organization. The HOD goals are to:

(From left) Gary Bonner, Shimon Perez Lodge of HOD immediate past president, receives an award from Jeff Romick, Shimon Perez Lodge of HOD president.

(From left) Gary Bonner, Shimon Perez Lodge of HOD immediate past president, receives an award from Jeff Romick, Shimon Perez Lodge of HOD president.

  • Raise funds for worthwhile charities
  • Support local institutions by the giving of our time
  • Support brethren in time of their difficulties
  • Promote the ideals and work of the Hebrew Order of David International within the community
  • Enjoy ourselves while we organize and participate in all our activities
  • Encourage our members to further their knowledge and understanding of the precepts and traditions of Judaism

Gary thanked the Brothers for their dedication, support, energy and participation. Jeff thanked the Brothers for making HOD a vibrant and meaningful organization. HOD is looking forward to another wonderful year of fun, learning and serving the community.
— Submitted by Jeff Romick

Tales from Camelot

Lakehill Preparatory School’s talented musical theater students took to the stage on Nov. 11 and 12, to present the beloved classic Camelot.
Borrowing from the Arthurian legends, Lerner and Loewe’s Camelot centers around an idealistic young King Arthur (played by an earnest Warren Lester), who hopes to create a kingdom built on honor and dignity, embodied by his Knights of the Round Table. His ideals, however, are tested when his lovely queen, Guinevere (played with great feeling and strong vocals by Lauren Bush), falls in love with the young knight Lancelot, and the fate of the kingdom hangs in the balance.
The production featured a collection of unforgettable songs centering on a well-rendered love triangle involving Arthur, Guinevere and Arthur’s right-hand man, Lancelot du Lac (Asher Chamoy), that depicts the conflict between love, honor and duty. Asher, a Lakehill freshman, is the son of Rita and Abraham Chamoy.
Chamoy was perfectly cast as an idealistic Lancelot who, despite his spiritual dedication, falls prey to human emotions. He captured Lancelot’s essential decency and nobility.
Jacob Besser provided a respite from the drama as Arthur’s ally King Pellinore, and Keegan Clendenin was a dynamic villain as Arthur’s evil, illegitimate son Mordred. Also shining in featured roles were Elizabeth Blanchard as the magical tutor Merlyn, Reese Brown as the enchantress Nimue, and Katie McKnight as the bewitching Morgan Le Fey.
The stripped-down stage was a perfect backdrop for the elaborate costumes. The Lakehill production showcased the talents of 33 Upper School students.
Lakehill’s production featured stage direction by Mark Guerra and musical direction by Tracy Herron. Jeff Lankov provided musical accompaniment, while Catherine D’Annibale coordinated the costumes. Second-grade teacher Emily Wolfe lent her talents as choreographer. Junior Kate Langley served as stage manager.
PFC Performing Arts Committee Chair Winnie Arrington and her team of parent volunteers helped bring Camelot to the stage.

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