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Dallas Doings: Legacy honors volunteers

Posted on 22 June 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
Have a Dallas Doings item? Email Sharon at sharon@tjpnews.com.

Legacy Senior Communities honors volunteers during awards ceremony

The staff and residents of The Legacy Senior Communities recently held a special event to recognize the individuals and groups who dedicate their time to enhancing the lives of the residents. This past year, more than 300 volunteers spent an estimated 6,500 hours at The Legacy Willow Bend alone, with a combined 9,700 hours spent serving seniors and staff across The Legacy Senior Communities.
The organization’s volunteer program has a wide variety of options for individuals as well as groups and organizations to get involved at the community. Whether giving manicures or simply listening and exchanging stories with residents, volunteers give the tremendous gift of their quality time.
The event, co-chaired by Nonie Schwartz and Marilyn Schwartz, included an awards ceremony during which Rivae Campo, volunteer coordinator for The Legacy Senior Communities, announced the Rookie of the Year Awards, the Outstanding Student Volunteer Award and the Outstanding Volunteer Group Award. Additionally, for the third year in a row Campo gave special recognition to The Legacy Willow Bend’s own knitting and crochet club, The Ladies of The Legacy Willow Bend.
The members of the club come together every Monday to knit and crochet beautiful hats and scarves for those in need throughout Greater Dallas. Each year, the group’s production numbers have increased tremendously, from last year’s whopping 2,600 items to this year’s 3,200 pieces which were donated to eight local organizations.
Hannah Hall, who visits the residents almost every Saturday, was honored by the community with the award for Outstanding Student Volunteer. For the past year Hall, 14, has visited the community to give residents manicures and call a bingo game or two. According to the Frisco teen, she learns a great deal by spending time and building relationships with the residents.
“I’ve always enjoyed surrounding myself with people I can learn from,” said Hall. “Seniors have an incredible amount of kindness and experiences to share. Spending time with the residents at The Legacy Willow Bend each week has been incredibly meaningful to me personally, as they are always willing to listen and share advice when I need it.
“When I first began volunteering it was during the summer, so I was at the community almost every day. Of course, with the school year that changed a bit, but I’m excited to spend more time with the residents this upcoming summer and continue to build new relationships.”
Additionally, Rookie of the Year Awards were presented to Ivonne Walker and Madison Bah for interacting and visiting the residents and supporting staff members at The Legacy Willow Bend.
The Outstanding Volunteer Group Award went to the psychology students from Collin College who volunteered this past year, with Josh Arduengo accepting the award on their behalf. As part of their class curriculum, 25 students each spent 20 hours throughout the Legacy Willow Bend campus assisting residents and team members during movie time and happy hour, as well as updating bulletin boards throughout the community, providing manicures, makeovers and much more.
“We are incredibly grateful to our volunteers for their willingness to spend their personal time in our community,” said Campo. “The influence they have on the residents and staff is indescribable. Volunteers give their time for a variety of reasons, and each person is unique and special to our community. Every visit — regardless of the activity or amount of time involved — is deeply appreciated by everyone involved.”
Anyone interested in volunteer opportunities can contact The Legacy Senior Communities Volunteer Coordinator Rivae Campo at rcampo@thelegacysc.org or call 972-468-6191.
— Submitted by Amy Jones

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Dallas Doings: National Senior Health and Fitness Day, Sunnyland award

Posted on 15 June 2017 by admin

Have a Dallas Doings item? Email sharon@tjpnews.com.

National Senior Health and Fitness Day

Recently, residents of The Legacy Willow Bend came together in recognition of National Senior Health and Fitness Day on May 31.
The interactive and fun events were designed to raise awareness of the importance of health and fitness for older Americans. The residents welcomed the celebration as a part of their already active lifestyle. The senior living community participated in the national movement by hosting various activities throughout the day to get everyone moving. Residents learned how to enhance their lifestyles and incorporate exercise to further improve strength, balance and flexibility.
Events such as a one-mile fun walk, tai chi demonstration, aqua toning and a happy hour with line dancing showcased The Legacy Willow Bend’s emphasis on whole-body wellness.
“At The Legacy Willow Bend, we surround residents with healthy options that fit their individual physical, spiritual and social needs,” said Alice Carpenter, wellness coordinator at The Legacy Willow Bend. “The national movement to celebrate wellness fits perfectly with our community’s philosophy. Throughout the day we highlighted several new activities, and many residents walked away with an overall sense of well-being.”
Studies by the National Institutes of Health show that Americans aged 65 and older who stay physically active improve their balance, strengthen their bodies, increase mobility, reduce their chances for depression and remain independent longer. The Legacy Willow Bend works to provide residents with the best and most comprehensive wellness programs available.
“We offer a variety of innovative fitness options that keep up with the latest trends. There really is something for everyone,” said Brian Barnes, COO/CFO of The Legacy Senior Communities, parent organization of The Legacy Willow Bend. “At The Legacy Willow Bend, we are inspired by the residents each day, especially by their dedication to continually challenging themselves to reach their personal fitness goals. We hope to show residents of Greater Dallas that fitness is an option for everyone regardless of age.”
— Submitted by Amy Jones

Sunnyland earns Retailer of the Year Award

Sunnyland Patio Furniture in Dallas is the recipient of The Home Furnishings Association (HFA) 2017 Retailer of the Year Award, which celebrates retailers who exhibit exceptional examples of philanthropy, technology, customer experience, mentoring, sustainability and store design/merchandising. Sunnyland is the first casual furniture retailer to win the award.
Sunnyland Patio Furniture is the largest patio furniture store in North Texas with a 37,000-square-foot showroom and over 75 outdoor furniture collections. With 47 years of outdoor furniture presence in Dallas, Sunnyland is the trusted, go-to store for North Texans families furnishing their outdoor space.
“We are honored to be recognized by HFA and the furniture community,” David Schweig, president of Sunnyland Patio Furniture, said. “Over the last few years, the outdoor category has become more integrated into the indoor category — the patio is now an extension of the indoor space. To be successful in this industry, as a specialty retailer, we have to provide a superior product and service. Most conglomerates don’t have the same standards that a small, locally owned family business does. Our relationship with our customers extends long after the point of sale, to ensure complete satisfaction. We will continue to work hard, every day, to be the best at what we do. I thank our dedicated employees and customers for making Sunnyland the No. 1 furniture retailer in the country.”
David, Debbie and Brad Schweig received their award at the 2017 Home Furnishings Association’s Retailer of the Year awards event, June 5 at the annual Home Furnishings Networking Conference in San Antonio.
— Submitted by Deborah Holt

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Dallas Doings: AJC annual meeting

Posted on 08 June 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

AJC annual meeting at Bush Library

On May 16, nearly 350 people attended the AJC annual meeting at the George W. Bush Presidential Center on the campus of SMU. AJC Dallas President Margot Carter highlighted AJC Dallas’ accomplishments during the first year of her term as she welcomed seven new regional board members: Brian Ellman, Cory Feldman, Paul Genender, Mark Platt, Karen-Lee Pollak, Sophia Stoller, and Mark Zilbermann. AJC executive committee member Adam Lampert was named president-elect. His two-year term succeeding Margot Carter will begin in May 2018.
Representative Phil King, author of the new anti-BDS law, greeted attendees via video message and thanked AJC for its advocacy work in passing HB 89. His remarks can be viewed at www.tinyurl.com/KingAJC.
For most in attendance, the highlight was the keynote speech by AJC Chief Executive Officer David Harris. His wide-ranging remarks included commentary on AJCs recent opening of an office in Warsaw, creation of a national Muslim-Leadership Advisory Council, and the growth of partisanship on the far right as well as the far left, while re-affirming AJCs status as “fiercely nonpartisan.”
“This was a great night for AJC and for the Dallas Jewish community,” remarked AJC Dallas Director Joel Schwitzer. “AJC has worked hard to increase our local impact and visibility. Tonight was a clear illustration of the efforts toward that goal.”
— Submitted by AJC Dallas office

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Dallas Doings: Yavneh engineers win national competition

Dallas Doings: Yavneh engineers win national competition

Posted on 01 June 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Yavneh engineers win national competition

Yavneh Academy of Dallas took home the grand prize at this year’s CIJE (Center for Initiatives in Jewish Education) Young Engineers Conference.
The conference, held in Los Angeles, attracted 48 teams representing the brightest young Jewish minds from across the country. A key part of the conference involved students presenting their extraordinarily creative projects to an esteemed panel of judges which included captains of industry, best-selling business authors, academics and entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and high-tech startup veterans, all of whom embody the spirit of Israel’s “Start Up Nation.”

Submitted photo (From left) a center for Initiatives in Jewish Education employee stands next to Ezra Ruderman, Vanessa Kibel, David Cohen and Yonatan Weintraub, co-founder of SpaceIL of Israel.

Submitted photo
(From left) a center for Initiatives in Jewish Education employee stands next to Ezra Ruderman, Vanessa Kibel, David Cohen and Yonatan Weintraub, co-founder of SpaceIL of Israel.

The students spent a year designing, developing and testing their ideas and creating prototypes able to withstand the rigor of peer and mentor examination. Twelve Yavneh students are participating in the two-year program with Yavneh physics and math teacher, Brittany Pendleton. The curriculum has been developed by CIJE. The first year’s focus is on electrical engineering and the second year is on biomedical engineering. After the second year a new two-year cohort will be created. In the meantime, a coding class will be introduced at Yavneh this year.
The Yavneh team won the grand prize for developing technology for the autonomous detection of hazards within bodies of water. “The technology, when placed in a buoy, detects swimmers in distress by sensing and analyzing unusual body movement in the water and movements in the water caused by dangers such as sharks,” said a CIJE press release.
The creative minds who developed the technology were Vanessa Kibel ’18, David Cohen ’19 and Ezra Ruderman ’19. The winning team spoke about “believing in the importance to use whatever God-given talents they had in making a positive change in the world.” Cohen went on to say, “I am always looking to solve problems; wherever there is pain or suffering or need, I think of better solutions.” Ruderman went on to say, “I hope that this invention is a great first step in positively impacting people’s lives.” Kibel added, “I hope that our device raises awareness to prevent drowning and other ocean dangers and will hopefully save lives.”
Jason Cury, president of CIJE, opened the conference. He emphasized the uniqueness and relevance of CIJE’s programs in preparing Jewish students for the ever-changing 21st century world they will face after college. “Nobody knows precisely what jobs that will be around when you all graduate from college within the next 8-10 years which is why it’s so important to develop the skills which will be required, and to be prepared for whatever challenges and opportunities that present themselves.”
Rabbi Maury Grebenau, principal of Yavneh Academy, echoed Mr. Cury’s statement, “The CIJE curriculum was exciting for us and a great fit for our program because it not only helped to cultivate STEM skills but also required students to budget and pitch their idea to others. The skills being built are life skills which will ensure our students are successful in the future.”
More exciting things came out of Yavneh’s trip to the CIJE conference. Yonatan Weintraub, co-founder of Space IL, the Israeli organization aiming to be just the fourth country to land a spacecraft on the moon gave the keynote address. He also took a selfie with the crowd that will accompany the spacecraft to the moon. It was also announced that the winning biomedical device next year will come with a scholarship gift and the opportunity to be mentored by scientists from the extraordinary Rambam Hospital in Haifa, Israel. Yavneh Academy students look forward to defending their title at the CIJE Young Engineers Conference, 2018.
— Submitted by Erica Morenoff

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Dallas Doings: Scholars, awards, lecture

Dallas Doings: Scholars, awards, lecture

Posted on 18 May 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Yavneh’s Schultz Scholars

On May 16, Yavneh Academy announced that six students have been named Schultz Scholars for the 2016-17 Academic Year. The Yavneh students include three graduating seniors and three juniors whose academic achievement and co-curricular leadership exemplify the best of Yavneh Academy.
They are:

Rosie Bernstein ‘17 (Stern College/Yeshiva University)

Rosie has served as co-editor-in-chief of the school’s award-winning student newspaper, The Bulldog Print; as co-chair of the Yavneh Spirit Committee; and as a leader in Points for Peace/Students Against Terrorism. A youth leader at Congregation Shaare Tefilla, Rosie has been active in Bnei Akiva and on the JFS Teen Editorial board. Following a gap year at Migdal Oz Seminary in Israel, Rosie will attend the honors program at Yeshiva University/Stern College.

Ariella Cohen ’17 (Barnard College/Columbia University)

Ariella, co-valedictorian of the class of 2017, has distinguished herself academically and co-curricularly during her four years at Yavneh. A leader in journalism, mathematics and community service/tikkun olam at Yavneh, Ariella represented Yavneh at last summer’s International Girls’ Math Competition — Ulpaniada 5776 — in Jerusalem, Israel.
She is active in Bnei Akiva and Junior World Affairs Council, she founded Every Smile Counts, and she completed a mechanical engineering internship at SMU. Ariella will attend Barnard College of Columbia University next year.

Megan Lacritz ’17 (Stern College/Yeshiva University)

Megan has excelled academically and has been a leader across the board at Yavneh and beyond. As co-chair of the Yavneh Spirit Committee, outstanding volunteer at CHAI, and Yachad Youth Leader, she has contributed grandly to school and community. As layout editor for the award-winning student newspaper, The Bulldog Print, Megan received top statewide awards for her graphic design. Following a Gap Year at Shaalvim for Women in Israel, Megan will attend Stern College of Yeshiva University.

Eliana Abraham ’18 (Grade 11)

A newcomer to Yavneh this year, Eliana has excelled in every area of school life and in the community. From volunteering with Bnei Akiva, to her involvement with NCSY, to her participation in the AIPAC High School Summit, Eliana has been a leader and organizer every step of the way. This coming year, she will serve as president of Dallas Yachad and as editor-in-chief of The Bulldog Print, Yavneh’s award-winning student newspaper.

Seth Gerstenfeld ’18 (Grade 11)

Seth is an all-around outstanding student at Yavneh and a patriotic U.S. citizen. From his participation in Yavneh cross-country and basketball, to his involvement with the Plano Rugby Club, Seth is a loyal and active student-athlete, photographer and athletic manager. He is also involved with the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (Sea Cadets) and plans to pursue ROTC during college and serve in the U.S. military.

Rachel Sasson ’18 (Grade 11)

Another Yavneh newcomer, Rachel excels academically and across a range of co-curricular activities. An active leader in cross-country, basketball and soccer, Rachel also serves as vice president of Yavneh’s Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD). Beyond school, she is involved with Girl Scouts, Friendship Circle of Dallas, and BBYO, where she serves as regional vice president of communications for the North Texas Oklahoma (NTO) region.

Beth Torah receives grant for welcoming interfaith families on website; more awards available

Congregation Beth Torah recently received a grant from The Federation of Jewish Men’s Clubs Keruv/Understanding Intermarriage for openly advertising that they are welcoming to interfaith families. Liz Cox accepted the award March 16 on behalf of the synagogue.
Beth Torah was one of 23 congregations meeting the criteria by specifically welcoming interfaith families on the front page of their website and also creating a dedicated Interfaith Families page with specific programs and statements to encourage their participation in synagogue life. Additionally, the FJMC offered assistance in helping these synagogues. The responses to this Website Challenge are still being received after the original closing date.
Encouraged by the many synagogues who have been motivated by this grant opportunity to revisit who they are and who they want to be, the National Center to Encourage Judaism has extended additional funding to allow other synagogues to participate in this welcoming opportunity. For further information, contact keruv@fjmc.org.

Temple Shalom holds annual meeting, wraps religious school

May is always a busy month filled with celebrations at Temple Shalom. On Friday, May 5, Temple members gathered together for the Confirmation of the class of 5777. Then, on Sunday, May 7, congregants enjoyed Temple Shalom’s 51st Annual Meeting followed by a fantastic slide show, 7th grade graduation, Next Dor Graduation and awards.
Congratulations to the new Temple Shalom officers, new graduates and award winners: Mark Fishkind, Volunteer of the Year; and Nina Minney, chair of the Shomrei Adamah – “Guardians of the Earth” Committee was awarded the Social Action Initiative Award. Brotherhood President Bill Hoffpauer awarded Lauren Stock the Tracy Fisher Memorial Next Dor Valedictorian Scholarship. Named for Tracy Fisher, the daughter of Temple Shalom members Laurel and Mark Fisher, who died in 2009, this award honors her memory and her love of Judaism and all things NFTY. “We are so very proud of Lauren for receiving this award. She is an amazing role model and certainly embodies the passion and spirit that Tracy had,” exclaimed Tracy’s mom, Laurel Fisher.
Thank you to all the staff, teachers, volunteers, parents and students who made 2016-2017 so amazing! “It was another great end to a great year at Temple Shalom,”said Rabbi Ariel Boxman.

Mahra Fox Pailet joins JWRP national board

Mahra Fox Pailet recently was appointed to the national board of directors of the Jewish Women’s Renaissance Project. JWRP also named Betty Grinstein of New York and Helen Zalik of Atlanta to its board. The three will help guide JWRP to inspire a new generation of Jewish women leaders.
Fox Pailet has extensive experience working in the Jewish community, at the Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters of Los Angeles, the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, and volunteering for Israel Bonds, the Dallas Jewish Historical Society, Congregation Shearith Israel of Dallas, the JCC of Dallas, the Ann and Nate Levine Academy of Dallas, and at AIPAC. In addition to her new role on the JWRP board, she will co-chair the JWRP’s development committee with JWRP’s vice president and co-founder, Michelle Leader.
She has an extensive professional background in marketing, communications, event planning, and product management. Fox Pailet lives in Dallas with her husband Kevin and three children.
“These incredible women personify our philosophy to a T. I am so honored to welcome them as board members and I am looking forward to the great work we will accomplish together,” said JWRP’s founding director, Lori Palatnik.

Ozsváth to discuss book at Sunday lecture

Professor Zsuzsanna Ozsváth with the Ackerman Center for Holocaust Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas will present a private lecture at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 21 in the Ackerman Center. Dr. Ozsváth will discuss her memoir, When the Danube Ran Red, about her time as a little girl in Budapest, Hungary in 1944. The lecture will be followed by a reception. Ozsváth is the Leah and Paul Lewis Chair in Holocaust Studies and director of the Holocaust Studies Program. Please RSVP to Bobbie Crowley at bcrowley@snabbo.com.

 

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Tikkun Olam in Action

Dr. Jonathan Nathan, son of Karen and Bassim Nathan, is a plastic surgeon specializing in reconstructive plastic surgery. Finishing his last year of fellowship at Loyola Hospital in Chicago, he recently joined a cadre of doctors sponsored by the Peruvian Surgical Society. The team went to Peru to perform surgeries to needy people in remote areas, particularly burn victims and children with cleft palates.

Dr. Jonathan Nathan

Dr. Jonathan Nathan

About 14 surgeons from across the United States flew to Arequipa on March 17 and returned March 28. They performed surgeries on numerous patients, young and old. At the end of the trip, Jonathan and his colleagues had time to visit the architectural beauty of the city of Cuzco.

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Dallas Doings: Cantor concert, new book, retailers of year

Dallas Doings: Cantor concert, new book, retailers of year

Posted on 11 May 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Cantors’ voices sure to be sweet treat

Temple Emanuel will host this year’s Community Cantor Concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 16, in the Tobian Auditorium.
Featured will be Cantors Vicky Glikin and Leslie Niren from Temple Emanu-El; Cantor Itzhak Zhrebker from Shearith Israel; Cantor Sheri Allen from Congregation Beth Shalom; and Cantor Devorah Avery and Emeritus Cantor Don Croll from Temple Shalom. This year’s theme is “Sweet as Honey.” Joining the cantors will be the Temple Emanu-El and Temple Shalom choirs as well as musicians from Shearith Israel.

Croll

Croll

Cost of the concert is $10 general admission or $36 for reserved seats. Tickets can be purchased online at https://participate.tedallas.org/communityconcert or at the door.

Allen

Allen

Elizabeth Silver in town with second book

Elizabeth L. Silver, confirmed in 1997 at Congregation Shearith Israel and graduated from Highland Park High School, will discuss her latest book, The Tincture of Time: A Memoir of (Medical) Uncertainty, at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 18 at the Wild Detectives Bookstore, 314 Eighth St., Dallas.
Set against the unexplained stroke of the author’s newborn daughter at six weeks, this stunning, unflinchingly honest memoir is a thought-provoking reflection on uncertainty in medicine and in life. Oprah Magazine described the book as “a delicate weave of cultural analysis, personal history, and religious teachings in a meditation on the limits of science and the boundless capacity of the human heart.” TINCTURE cover (1)
Her debut novel, The Execution of Noa P. Singleton, received national acclaim and was published in seven languages and option for film.
Elizabeth’s writing has appeared in McSweeney’s, The Huffington Post, The Rumpus, The Los Angeles Review, The Millions and The Dallas Morning News, among other publications, and she has been a writer-in-residence at several artist colonies in the United States, France and Spain. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, the MA program in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia in England, and Temple University Beasley School of Law, Elizabeth has taught English as a Second Language in Costa Rica, writing and literature at Drexel University and St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, and worked as an attorney in California and Texas, where she was a judicial clerk for the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals.
Elizabeth is currently working on a new novel, and several film and TV projects. Born and raised in New Orleans and Dallas. Elizabeth is the daughter of Kathi and Charles Silver of Dallas; she lives in Los Angeles with her family.

Schweigs named HFA Retailers of Year

Father-and-son duo, David and Brad Schweig, of Sunnyland Outdoor Furniture in Dallas were recently named Home Furnishings Association Retailers of the Year in the category of businesses with a sales volume under $10 million.
Sunnyland is the first casual furniture retailer to win HFA’s Retailer of the Year award. This 47-year-old company is the largest outdoor and patio casual furniture store in Texas with a 37,000-square-foot showroom, clearance center and on-site distribution center. David prides himself on working in an industry “whose primary purpose is to improve the quality of life of customers by providing them with comfort and relaxation.”
David and Brad Schweig will receive their awards and be celebrated at the 2017 Home Furnishings Association’s Retailer of the Year awards event, June 5 at the annual Home Furnishings Networking Conference in San Antonio.

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Dallas Doings: Bagel Run, Spring Fair, promotion, new employee

Dallas Doings: Bagel Run, Spring Fair, promotion, new employee

Posted on 04 May 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

The J to host 31st annual Bagel Run Sunday, May 14

Before brunch,
lace up your sneakers
on Mother’s Day

It’s time to celebrate mom while getting the whole family moving. The 31st annual Bagel Run, hosted on Mother’s Day 2017, promises to be a must-attend event for the entire family. The race has three options — Kids K, 5K and 10K — and runners of all levels and ages are encouraged to participate. The race concludes with a host of activities including a bounce house, DJ, and stretching and yoga demonstrations led by fitness experts. All runners will also get to enjoy a delicious bagel buffet, and there will be fresh flowers for all the moms in attendance.

Bagel Run

Bagel Run

 
The Bagel Run will be held on Sunday, May 14, at The J, 7900 Northaven Road in Dallas. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. Advance registration is $25 for individuals and $55 for families. Day-of registration is $30 for individuals and $65 for families. New this year is Team Racing; families, co-workers, and friends can all run under the same team for only $180 for 10 or fewer runners. Kids ages 4 through 13 are just $8 for any race. Registration is available online and packet pickup is available on Thursday, May 11, from 4:30 to 7 p.m. and Friday, May 12, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at The J, as well as race day at the event. Awards will be presented in several different age categories. All children participating in the Kids K will also receive a medal.
“The Bagel Run has been a Mother’s Day tradition here in North Texas for 31 years,” said Artie Allen, The J’s CEO. “We’re proud that families can do something healthy and active together while also celebrating mom.”
This year, The J is partnering with Genesis Women’s Shelter of Dallas and donating items in support of their meaningful cause. The Summer Camp Supply Drive will assist kids at the shelter. Attendees are asked to bring items including sunscreen, chapstick with sunscreen, boys’/girls’ sunglasses, flip-flops (adult and child sizes), arm floaties, kid-friendly healthy snacks and drinks, summer toys/activities or arts and crafts supplies.
Runners and walkers should be adequately prepared for participation in the Bagel Run. Appropriate training and medical review should be completed before participating. Several training guides are available and provide recommendations for training.
Sponsors for the 2017 Bagel Run include: Platinum — Cindi’s Restaurant Corporation and Reliable Plant Maintenance, Inc. (RPM); Gold — The Julie and Mike Weinberg Family, Mark and Carol Kreditor, Virginia Cook Realtors, Kahn Mechanical, Key-Whitman Eye Center, Zev Shulkin, PSW, Whole Foods, The Leftin Girls Foundation, and Genecov Orthodontics; Silver — Sue Pryor and Peyton Blackwell, Carol and Steve Aaron, Bobby Gibbs, First Citizen Bank, The Family of Lisa and David Genecov, The Legacy Senior Communities, Cathy and Joel Brook/Dallas Podiatry Works, Hodges Capital, The Ochstein Family, Wickman Agency of Allstate, Ellen, Josh, Sloan and Samantha Ungerman, The Baum Family Loves to Run, and Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC; and Bronze — Marilyn and Donald H. Schaffer, Reagan ChiroSport Center, Robert and Liz Liener, Laurie and David Judson, Barbi, Scott, Kacey, Ella and Olivia Cohen, Neil Beckerman, Gary Bradshaw, The Gents Place, Debra Goldstein Phares Family, Monte and Bonnie Hurst Family, Celia and Larry Schoenbrun, Ashton Podiatry and Melissa Rubenstein, MD. Special recognition sponsors include: Baylor, Scott & White Health, Texas Jewish Post and The Lieberman Family Wellness Center.
— Submitted by Jef Tingley

Spring Fair a success

Congregation Anshai Torah says Kol Hakavod and many thanks to Heather Vanocour and her amazing team including Ilene Baumel, Jason Cathcart, Andy Cohen, Bethany Last, Marcy Kahn, Ben and Lisa Kenter, Stephanie Kufert, Denise Levine, Rachel Nicholas, Nicole Post, Barrett Stern, and Harvey Swento along with more than 100 volunteers — and sponsors — all of whom made the 2017 Spring Fair of West Plano presented by Parkhaven Dental Care a huge success! SPRING FAIR leadership
“We are thrilled to once again open our backyard and to see the generations of families having such a great time, while supporting the students of our congregation,” said Congregation Anshai Torah’s Rabbi Stefan Weinberg. “The smiles on everyone’s faces brings us to why we are here and that is to share our community, and what a wonderful community it is.”
Proceeds from the April 23 event — sponsored by Presenting Sponsor Dr. Michael Pincus & Parkhaven Dental Care; Lead Sponsors Kahn Mechanical Contractors, Ruibal’s Plants of Texas, the Texas Jewish Post, Valliance Bank, Associate Sponsor Kessler Collins Attorneys at Law; Business Sponsors Advance Heart Care, Children’s Health, Game Pad MVPs, Gardere, IMA Waldman, Marsh & McLennan Agency; and Activity Sponsors Amusement Management International, Camp Young Judaea, DJS Etc, Frisco Kid’s Dentistry, Dr. Greg Greenberg and Rx Smile, Proforma, and The Legacy Willow Bend — directly support Congregation Anshai Torah’s special programming as well as the Religious School and Preschool programs.
“I love this kind of day where we get to sell our things to people in the community and where everyone is really having a lot of fun and supporting our Jewish education,” said Josh Schnitzer, 9, who, with his sister Allie, 11, both Anshai Torah Religious School students, helps his mother Stacey Kaplan of Geodes by Stacey, a vendor at the Fair, in the design, production, and selling of the gift line.
For Stephanie Kufert, who coordinated the more than 100 volunteers, it was also a great day. “We’ve had high schoolers and grandparents helping out and everyone has been happy to give their time,” she said. “Everywhere you look someone is helping out, the booths were full, people enjoyed themselves, and it was all a good day.”
From a fully scheduled Carter BloodCare bus allowing many lives to be saved, to the yummies and fun, beautiful art and other vendor-ware, to the biggest smiles on even the littlest kiddoes, what a beautiful day to support the education programs at Congregation Anshai Torah, Plano — with a future for the children that begins with such sunny support.

CD Wealth Management promotes Friedman

Ilona Friedman was recently promoted to principal at CD Wealth Management. Friedman specializes in comprehensive financial planning and wealth management with a focus on working with women and individuals in transition.
“Ilona’s expertise, commitment, and innovation have a major impact on the firm and our clients,” said Scott Cohen, founder and principal.

Ilona Friedman

Ilona Friedman

“We are honored to welcome Ilona as a partner, and we look forward to her leadership in the firm,” added Andy Dropkin, principal.
Bill Gershon joins Rosenthal Energy Advisors as executive vice president
Bill Gershon has joined Rosenthal Energy Advisors in the capacity of executive vice president, business development. Bill served as senior rabbi of Congregation Shearith Israel in Dallas for 18 years. He is the immediate past president of the Rabbinical Assembly, one of the world’s largest international rabbinic associations. Bill achieved significant success in leading major fundraising campaigns raising millions of dollars in the nonprofit sector and brings a plethora of expertise in strategic planning, marketing and public relations. His extraordinary communication skills, coupled with his inexhaustible drive for excellence, are a welcomed addition to REA.

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Dallas Doings: Holocaust survivor tells story at Temple Shalom, Ben & Jerry’s, Mankoff

Dallas Doings: Holocaust survivor tells story at Temple Shalom, Ben & Jerry’s, Mankoff

Posted on 27 April 2017 by admin

By Steve Weintraub
Special to the TJP

Local Holocaust survivor, Sara Rigler, was the featured guest and speaker at the Temple Shalom Brotherhood’s Yom HaShoah commemorative event Saturday  evening, April 22, in the synagogue’s Epstein Chapel. A reception took place before the event.Yom Hashoah 1
Her harrowing and miraculous story of survival, which is detailed in her book, 10 British Prisoners of War Saved My Life, was recounted for the crowd who listened intently to her story being told as she was interviewed by former Temple Shalom Brotherhood President and Hall of Famer Bob Weinfeld.

Sara Rigler and Bob Weinfeld

Sara Rigler and Bob Weinfeld

 
Mrs. Rigler, up until her early teens, along with her family, had lived a life of privilege, which was suddenly ended when the Russians and later the Germans had invaded her hometown of Shavli, Lithuania.
Her father was imprisoned by the Russians and later killed by the Germans along with all the men in Shavli. Her mother and sister were forced into a horrible and crowded existence in the Shavli Jewish ghetto and later the Stutthoff concentration camp.
As the Allied troops were advancing in the latter stages of World War II upon the concentration camp, her sister and mother were led on a forced death march deep into Nazi Germany, where she was implored by her mother and sister to try to escape as they were near death from the starvation and unhealthful conditions. She was the healthiest and they wanted her to survive.
She somehow managed to slip away from the marching line and escaped to a farmhouse where she was later found by Willie Fisher, a British POW from the Battle of Dunkirk. He and nine other British POWs nursed and fed her back to reasonable health and wanted to care for her further, as they too were being marched deeper into Germany three weeks later away from the advancing Allied troops.Yom Hashoah 7
Sara did not want to endanger her new friends’ lives. She decided to stay behind and managed to find work with a local German family till the Soviet army liberated the area.
From there she moved on from job to job and had other harrowing experiences until 1947, whereupon she was offered a marriage of convenience to a rabbinic student, transportation to America and a divorce once she arrived.
It was important to Sara to resume her education as she settled in Brooklyn, New York, lived with a war widow, and had a job caring for her son. She then finished high school and graduated from Brooklyn Jewish Hospital in 1949 as a registered nurse.
She married her husband, Bill Rigler, a struggling attorney at that time who was “as poor as a church mouse,” she joked, following her graduation. He went on to become a New York Supreme Court judge.
Her family, who were in attendance last Saturday, grew to include two children and grandchildren.
Sara also became very active in politics as a state committeewoman in New York and enjoyed knowing political people of influence who could make things better for others, she explained.
Throughout her adult life in America, she began a search to find her 10 British POW rescuers which took 20 years. In 1972, they were all finally reunited. Her book details a diary and letters from two of the gentlemen.Yom Hashoah 5
Her POW friends are now all deceased. Yet Sara has survived and thrived in her life, a wonderful irony and testimony to her plight and to others who’ve pushed past and built new lives and legacies from a horrific time in their pasts.
This year’s Temple Shalom Brotherhood  Yom HaShoah event was chaired and directed by Sander Gothard.

Ben & Jerry’s partners with Susan G. Komen North Texas

On Free Cone Day (April 4), Robyn and Hunter Rose scooped 16,107 free ice cream scoops to honor customers and raise awareness for breast cancer at their Ben & Jerry’s locations in Highland Village and Plano. More than 1 million scoops of ice cream were dipped worldwide.

Submitted photo Hunter Rose (left) and Chuck Cooperstein on Free Cone Day

Submitted photo
Hunter Rose (left) and Chuck Cooperstein on Free Cone Day

“We love getting involved with and giving back to our communities. It’s amazing what we can do together over shared values and several scoops of ice cream,” said Hunter Rose, ice cream czar at Ben & Jerry’s of Plano and Highland Village. Ben & Jerry’s has been a longtime advocate of social causes like marriage equality, environmental sustainability and ensuring that their ice cream is made in the best way possible, which includes sourcing fair-trade and non-GMO ingredients.
Ben & Jerry’s of Plano and Highland Village partnered with the Susan G. Komen North Texas foundation to spread the word about dealing with breast cancer within the community. Rose explained that “the money raised by this group stays in our community to educate and battle against breast cancer in our North Texas community. They are a wonderful group filled with concerned individuals, survivors and family members of survivors. There is no pressure to donate, but since you aren’t paying for your ice cream on this day, if you can find it in your heart and pocketbook to drop a dollar or two in their buckets… it will be put to good use.” The Susan G. Komen North Texas foundation helped Ben & Jerry’s scoop and keep things clean and organized. Among those in the Jewish community who participated in the event were Chuck Cooperstein, the voice of the Dallas Mavericks, and Barry Horn, sports columnist for the Dallas Morning News.

Mankoff joins ZBT Foundation board

The Zeta Beta Tau Foundation welcomed Jeffrey (Jeff) W. Mankoff, Sigma (Tulane University) ’84, as one of its the three newest members of the board of directors. “It is an honor to be selected to serve on the Zeta Beta Tau Foundation board of directors. For me, ZBT Sigma Chapter (Tulane University) is where I forged lasting and treasured friendships. And through ZBT, new friendships and connections are being formed as well. I am looking forward to working with the many talented brothers on the Foundation Board. What a great experience it was attending and participating in the International Convention, and meeting the many young college brothers eager to learn, connect and forge new friendships. ZBT is making a difference.”

Mankoff

Mankoff

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Dallas Doings: Scouts, Conversation Project, Wiesenthal

Posted on 20 April 2017 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Attention: Scouts Religious Emblems Workshop

The Dallas Jewish Committee on Scouting will conduct a Religious Emblems Workshop from 2-5 p.m., Sunday, April 23, at Temple Emanu-El, 8500 Hillcrest Road.
The following awards will be worked on at the event: Maccabee for Tiger Cubs and Cub Scouts, Aleph for Cub Scouts, Ner Tamid for Scouts and Venturers and Etz Chaim for older Scouts and Venturers.
Cubs should be able to complete the Aleph or Maccabee at the workshop. Because of service attendance requirements, Boy Scouts working on the Ner Tamid or Etz Chaim will not be able to complete them at this session but should only need to complete the attendance requirements after taking this workshop. Workbooks and application forms will be provided to all attendees. Cost is $5 per Scout attending.
The emblem itself, the certificate of achievement, and processing for them is $21, payable at the workshop to P.R.A.Y. for the Maccabee emblem. Applications for Aleph will be given to the parents to be sent in when requirements are completed. In order to register, please provide your or your Scout’s name, rank, unit number, and the emblem on which you will be working by filling out the form on the registration page at http://bit.ly/2o2ijbX.
Scouts should wear their full field uniform (Class A) and bring a pen or pencil and a spiral notebook. For more information, visit dallasjscouts.org.
The Dallas Jewish Committee on Scouting is also in search of host families for this year’s Tzofim Friendship Caravan. The annual Israeli scout delegation will be in the Dallas area from July 3-11. For more details contact Mark Zable at 469-774-0110 or caravan@DallasJScouts.org.

Harriet Warshaw, executive director of The Conversation Project, coming to Dallas

The Conversation Project is dedicated to helping people talk about their wishes for end of life care.
Its mission is to help people have this conversation and make sure their loved ones know and respect their desires. Talking about end-of-life wishes won’t make a death any less sad, but it will alleviate the stress and potential guilt of the decision making process.
As a parent, having this conversation is a gift to children and as an adult child, it may calm parents’ fears and anxiety about end of life. There is a need to help clients express their wishes.

DAGS partnering with Conversation Project

The Dallas Area Gerontological Society (DAGS) is partnering with The Conversation Project for two free events.
The workshop at The Senior Source on Thursday April 27 from 10 a.m.-noon will focus on professionals who work with boomers and seniors. The workshop will discuss having this conversation from a values perspective, the importance of financial safety and security and how you can enhance your client experience by being the go-to person for an older adult.
This seminar is perfect for financial planners, real estate and insurance agents, health care workers, social workers, etc.
Details and registration are available at http://conta.cc/2oSMr9V.

Train the Trainer

The “Train the Trainer” seminar at Belmont Village is from 10 a.m.-noon Friday, April 28 and is geared toward volunteers who work with seniors. This seminar is perfect for Hospice, faith based or community volunteers. The seminar will discuss tips and learn about free tools, such as the starter kit and “How to Choose a Health Care Proxy” kit, and learn how to effectively help others begin to have the conversation.
Call Belmont Village to reserve your seat. 214-559-5402.
Seating is limited for all events.
— Laurie Miller

DHM/CET’s Wiesenthal performance enjoyed by many

 

Award-winning stage actor Tom Dugan performed his critically acclaimed one-man play, Wiesenthal which opened for one night only at the Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Theater at Hockaday School. The event opened there due to a flooding issue at the Wyly Theatre on  April 5.
The performance was sponsored by the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance and was staged by ATTPAC. Wiesenthal was part of the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Off Broadway On Flora Series.
Wiesenthal depicts the final case of Simon Wiesenthal, nicknamed the “Jewish James Bond,” who devoted his life to bringing more than 1,100 Nazi war criminals to justice. Dugan won the 2011 Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award for his portrayal of a 94-year-old Wiesenthal still actively searching for the highest-ranking living Nazi while giving a lecture to students.
Proceeds from opening night of this one-man play about Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesenthal will support the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance.
Co-chairs for the April 5 benefit performance are Jen Goldstein, Jolene Risch and Yana Mintskovsky. Committee members are Jarrod Beck, Dana Carroll, Megan Hyman, Melanie H. Kuhr, Aviva Linksman, Mahra Pailet, Melanie Rasansky, Alice Skinner, Carrie Sternberg and Blair Wittneben.

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Dallas Doings: Vigil, new film, play

Dallas Doings: Vigil, new film, play

Posted on 06 April 2017 by admin

Submitted report

Congregation Beth Torah’s annual 24-hour Holocaust vigil begins Saturday night, April 22, as people from many faiths in North Texas gather to read the names of thousands of people murdered in the Holocaust.
The Men’s Club at Congregation Beth Torah, a Conservative synagogue in Richardson, has organized the “Reading of the Names” event every year since 2002 to preserve the memories of the Nazis’ 11 million victims, 6 million of them Jews.

Photo: David Duchin/dspnphotos.com Participants read names at Congregation Beth Torah’s annual 24-hour Holocaust vigil service in 2016.

Photo: David Duchin/dspnphotos.com
Participants read names at Congregation Beth Torah’s annual 24-hour Holocaust vigil service in 2016.

“Most of the victims were only known by a number and were never given a proper

memorial,” said Ed Matisoff, co-chair of the project. “The Dallas community has the opportunity to keep their memories alive by reading and listening to the names. It’s both an obligation and an honor for us to do this.”
The event begins at 9 p.m. April 22 with a moving candlelighting ceremony in the synagogue sanctuary. The theme is “Unto Every Person There Is A Name,” the title of a classic Israeli poem about the Holocaust.
Then, in 15-minute shifts, volunteers of all ages and faiths read the names, ages, and hometowns of individual victims, as well as the dates of their deaths. The details are supplied by Yad Vashem, the Holocaust memorial, museum and research institute in Jerusalem, as well as the United States Holocaust Museum. The readings pause periodically for the Kaddish, the Jewish prayer for the departed.
“The entire community is invited, and we’re very gratified that more people join us every year, both as readers and to listen to the names,” said Jeff Markowitz, co-chair of the project. “It’s hard to put into words just what an emotional, meaningful experience this is for everyone involved.”
Some of the spiritual leaders taking part this year include Rabbi Elana Zelony of Beth Torah; Shakeel Muhammad of the Islamic Association of Collin County; Dr. Robert Chishold, Jr. of the Dallas Theological Seminary; and Dr. Michael Perry of King’s Right Hand Ministries. Representatives of many houses of worship, schools, and organizations will participate, and some readers will take part from around the world through Skype.
The Reading of the Names continues through the night, and then will pause at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday for a breakfast program featuring Cheryl Drazin, director of the Anti-Defamation League’s North Texas/Oklahoma regional office. She will discuss the organization’s battle against bigotry, prejudice, and anti-Semitism in the current political environment.
The readings will then resume, culminating in a closing ceremony that ends at 9 p.m.
The Reading of the Names program is unique in North Texas, and Beth Torah Men’s Club has been honored by the national Federation of Jewish Men’s Clubs for organizing it year after year.
“Reading of the Names is sacred at Beth Torah because it helps us grasp the enormity of the loss during the Holocaust as well as gives us a feeling of solidarity with one another and determination to make the world a better place,” stated Rabbi Elana Zelony, Beth Torah’s spiritual leader.
Congregation Beth Torah is located at 720 W. Lookout Drive in Richardson, near the crossroads of Bush Turnpike and Central Expressway. For more information, or to request the opportunity to participate in the program, call the synagogue at 972-234-1542, ext. 227.
— Submitted by Laura Matisoff

Mondell’s new short

Veteran filmmaker Cynthia Salzman Mondell’s newest short will screen this week at the Texas Women’s Caucus for Arts’ Vignette during Dallas Arts Week through April 9, at the former Women’s Museum Building in Fair Park.
Mondel explained what inspired the project.IMG_9263 copy
“After the Democratic Convention, I was elated with the possibility of witnessing the election of the first woman president. I thought about my grandmother, who could not vote until 1920; about my mother, who taught me to vote; and about my legacy, my daughter, Fonya.
“I bought my tickets to be at Hillary Clinton’s inauguration. I was devastated when she lost. When I heard about the Women’s March, I knew I was going. After all, I already had my plane tickets and a place to stay. And I needed to get back on my feet and keep fighting for women’s rights.
“In my six-minute video, I hoped to capture the excitement, the camaraderie and diversity of the March. Signs, music and dress were artistic and political expressions of both women and men. And I collected some great shoe stories for my Sole Sisters film.”
The Women’s March opened Wednesday, April 5.
On Thursday, April 6, from 3 to 4:30 p.m., Cynthia will join other female industry leaders for a panel discussion. The film screens daily. For more information visit https://texaswca.org.

Cedar Hill produces play about the Holocaust, garners awards

On March 29, The Cedar Hill ISD Theatre Arts Department presented Sending Down the Sparrows, a play which calls attention to the systematic persecution and extermination of the handicapped by Nazi Germany through the character of Viktor, a young man who is a reluctant member of the Hitler Youth.
Viktor has a mentally handicapped sister who is the ward of a state institution. The theatre arts and CHISD communications departments hosted the performance for community groups uniquely connected to the subject of this play. Among those in attendance were a group of Holocaust survivors. Last month, six schools competed in the UIL district-level theatre competition, and CISD was one of three that will move forward to the bi-district round.

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