Archive | Dallas Doings

Dallas Doings: Farm Fitness, Herzl’s Luncheon

Posted on 08 March 2018 by admin

Compiled by: Sharon Wisch-Ray
from submitted reports

E-I-E-I-Instagram: Farm-inspired fitness classes at the J

Escape the stress of city life and squeeze in a great workout with the return of the Farm-to-City Series at the Jewish Community Center of Dallas (The J). After a successful fall series incorporating the tranquility of farm life with the workouts of city dwellers, The J is once again bringing back this unique fitness fusion. Free and low-cost courses including Bunny Yoga, Adopt Me–Dog Yoga and Goat Yoga Spring Harmony will take place on Sundays throughout March and April. Other Farm-to-City Series events include a special Earth Day Yoga class and a mid-section workout taught by “Ab Guru” Dashaun Johnson. It’s all part of The J’s “Let’s Get Social” initiative, which brings together the community in a variety of new and different ways to help people connect and interact beyond social media.
The Farm-to-City Series began with Bunny Yoga last week. From 1 to 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, it’s Adopt Me–Dog Yoga with dogs from Take Me Home Pet Rescue. Attendees can practice their downward-facing dog while surrounded by a host of four-legged friends looking for forever homes. The class is followed by a Let’s Get Social hour from 2 to 3 p.m. with complimentary snacks and apple cider. Adopt Me–Dog Yoga is free to attend, but RSVP is required due to space limitations. Reservations can be made at www.jccdallas.org. The J will also be collecting donation items for Take Me Home Pet Rescue on-site. Suggested items include canned puppy food, dry cat food and disinfecting wipes. A full list is posted on www.jccdallas.org.
Goat Yoga Spring Harmony will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. Sunday, March 18, and Sunday, April 29. Back by popular demand, this hands-on/hooves-on outdoor class allows participants to enjoy an exhilarating yoga class interacting with baby pygmy goats eager to join in the poses (the goats weigh only 10-12 pounds, making them the perfect weight for providing a mini-massage). Cost is $15 non-members/$10 members and space is limited. Reservations can be made at www.jccdallas.org. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be moved indoors.
To help chase away the gloom of winter, a Pamper You–Improve Your Mood Yoga will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 25. A follow-up to courses taught in December and January, this special yoga class includes sensory experiences such as sunlight therapy vitamin D treatment, a self-guided foot massage and a group, gentle-flow yoga to help boost anyone’s mood and return harmony to their life. Cost is $25 non-members/ $20 members and space is limited. Reservations can be made at www.jccdallas.org.
From 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 15, it’s The Ab Guru with The J’s boxing expert Tristan Ellison joined by Nike Pro Dashaun Johnson, aka “Ab Guru,” leading an action-packed, 90-minute workout geared specifically to sculpting the belly and midsection. Cost is $25 non-members/$20 members and space is limited. Reservations can be made at www.jccdallas.org.
The J will celebrate the planet with a special Earth Day Yoga class on Sunday, April 22, from 4 to 5 p.m. Participants will enjoy the powerful beat of conga drums and the relaxing beauty of the outdoors. The event is free, but RSVP to ensure space is required at www.jccdallas.org. Before the Earth Day Yoga class begins, the community is invited to a complimentary Let’s Get Social hour from 3 to 4 p.m. Healthy snacks and apple cider will be provided.
“After the success of the Farm-to-City Series in the fall, we knew we had to bring it back but bigger, better and with bunnies,” said Terri Arends, The J’s group director. “Animals deliver positive wellness, and we hope attendees can take a moment to enjoy the charm of farm life while finding bliss in every breath.”
All Farm-to-City Series events will be held on The J’s campus at 7900 Northaven Road in Dallas. More information is available online or by contacting Terri Arends at tarends@jccdallas.org.

Herzl’s Lifesaver Luncheon

The Herzl Group of The Dallas Chapter of Hadassah will hold its annual Lifesaver Luncheon at 11 a.m. Monday, March 19, 2018, at The Legacy at Willow Bend, 6101 Ohio Drive in Plano. The cost to attend is $25, and checks should be made out to Hadassah, and mailed to Marjorie Rosenberg, 6800 Del Norte Lane, Apt. 241, Dallas, TX 75225. Your check is your reservation. Please RSVP by Monday, March 12.
This year Herzl Group is not only celebrating its annual event but also the 100th year of Hadassah in Israel. Hadassah started taking care of the people in Israel that many years ago by sending nurses to help with unhealthy conditions and Hadassah has not stopped its quest for giving all races, religions and nationalities hope and good health.
This popular annual event is always very well-attended. There will be entertainment, door and raffle prizes, excellent food and warm companionship. You don’t have to be a member of Hadassah to attend; guests and men are welcome. There will be a bus from the JCC; to reserve a place on the bus, write “BUS” on your check. The bus will depart from the JCC at 10:15 a.m. and return to the JCC after the luncheon.
Whether you are a member or not, Herzl Group welcomes you to join them for a lovely afternoon and celebration.

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JFS’ Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund will benefit from 2018 annual Chili Cook-off

Posted on 01 March 2018 by admin

Jewish Family Services’ Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund will be the beneficiary of the annual Dallas Kosher Chili Cook-off, which is celebrating its 25th year.
The festivities will kick off at 11 a.m. Sunday, March 18, at Tiferet Israel, 10909 Hillcrest in Dallas. The event has grown every year in the past quarter-century.
Since 1994, the Cook-off has made donations to 55 nonprofit agencies.
“The Dallas Kosher Chili Cook-off selected Hurricane Harvey Relief as the sole sharing charity last September because the Cook-off committee wanted to provide financial support to those in need and to remind everyone, six months after the hurricane hit, that the need for help still exists in Houston and will continue for some time,” Cook-off Co-chair Ed Jerome said.
As soon as Hurricane Harvey made landfall, JFS staff started working with community partners such as the city of Dallas and the American Red Cross to understand the need locally for evacuees, as well as what resources could be directed to our partners on the ground in the areas hit by the devastation.
JFS volunteers, donors and lay leaders purchased, donated, sorted, boxed up and sent thousands of clothing items, housewares, hygiene products, cleaning supplies and other basic necessities to families who lost everything in Houston and South Texas. JFS sent seven trailers of supplies to those hard hit areas.
JFS staff provided crisis intervention and counseling services to clients temporarily dislocated by the storm. They offered short-term assistance such as case management, emergency food, clothing, hygiene products, medication assistance and financial assistance. For those individuals staying long-term in Dallas, JFS’ entire continuum of wrap-around care was offered in order to help them get back on their feet.
The JFS team was also called upon by JFS Houston to provide additional support at their office for those families that stayed in the area.
None of this would have been possible without the power of the Dallas Jewish community, notably the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, which coordinated many local efforts, underwrote serving 50,000 kosher meals to Houston’s Jewish community and transported donations in an 18-wheeler. The Aaron Family JCC served as a hub for dropping off donations and helped the Federation get them to Houston. Dallas Kosher and kosher caterers Simcha Kosher Catering, Taste of the World and Texas Kosher BBQ prepared, transported and served the 50,000 kosher meals. Area synagogues, organizations and day schools mobilized their forces as well to collect donations to send to Houston and volunteer in local shelters. It was a community effort. The outpouring of support for the JFS Harvey Relief efforts was beyond anything imaginable.
Houston’s problems are still not resolved. Over 70 percent of the Jewish community, homes, synagogues, schools, senior center and the Jewish Community Center were affected. Many of these structures are still unusable.
“Regardless of how hot anyone’s chili recipe may be, it warms my heart even more to see our community coming together in unity and friendship sharing a common goal like the Kosher Chili Cook-off and helping local charities,” Tiferet Israel Rabbi Shawn Zell said.
Also as part of the event, Jewish Family Service, Tiferet Israel and its neighbor, Royal Lane Baptist Church, will conduct a food drive supporting the North Texas Food Bank at Jewish Family Service. Bring canned goods and other non-perishable items to the Cook-off.

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Dallas Doings: Scholar’s Conference, Marlene Tretsman

Posted on 01 March 2018 by admin

Holocaust experts to share their findings at scholars’ conference

The UT Dallas Ackerman Center for Holocaust Studies will welcome Holocaust scholars, theologians and survivors for the 48th annual Scholars’ Conference on the Holocaust and the Churches Saturday-Monday.
The collection of experts will share their findings in hopes that the lessons of the Holocaust will remain relevant. Nils Roemer, director of the Ackerman Center, said the conference focuses on being interfaith, interdisciplinary and international.
“It will be an open environment in which scholars and Ph.D. students join in a conversation and create a community of like-minded individuals who pursue similar things,” said Roemer, the Stan and Barbara Rabin Professor of Holocaust Studies at UTD. “We also are bringing together people of various backgrounds to discuss the Holocaust from historical, philosophical and theological perspectives.”
Franklin H. Littell and Hubert G. Locke founded the conference in 1970. Various universities have held it over the years. Under an agreement signed last fall, the Ackerman Center will lead and host the event on a continuing basis.
This year’s conference will feature three tracks: The Holocaust: History and Pedagogy; Faith, Memory and Responsibility; and Philosophy and Aesthetics. Roemer said the conference will include discussions about responsibility for the Holocaust.
“Where does the responsibility lie? This creates all sorts of lines of investigation that are relevant to ask today,” he said. “Where do we have to voice our opinions? Where are we quietly complicit? When do we have to overtly oppose immoral actions?”
The keynote speaker Sunday, March 4, will be Irene Hasenberg Butter, a peace activist and Holocaust survivor. Butter, professor emerita of public health at the University of Michigan, is a frequent speaker who shares her experience during World War II and stresses the importance of never being a bystander and that one person can make a difference.
Roemer said UT Dallas was chosen to host the conference because it is a young and dynamic university located in a diverse part of Dallas-Fort Worth, and because of the Ackerman Center’s success.
“We’re taking something that has existed somewhere else and we’re now placing it into a new context,” he said. “If we do a good job, it will create new connections and new synergies.”

—Submitted by Phil Roth

 

Author Trestman to lecture at Historical Society

The Dallas Jewish Historical Society will present noted author and historian Marlene Trestman at its lecture series, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 6, at the Aaron Family JCC, 7900 Northaven Road.
Trestman is the author of Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin. Prompted by her research on Margolin’s early life and by her own childhood in New Orleans as a Jewish orphan, Trestman is currently working on her second book, The History of New Orleans Jewish Orphans Home, 1855-1946.
To support her research, the American Jewish Archives awarded Trestman the 2015-2016 Frankel Family Fellowship. She presented portions of her work at the 2015 Southern Jewish Historical Society (SJHS) Conference in Nashville and at the 2016 conference in Natchez, Mississippi, Nov. 5, 2016.
Trestman presented a third facet of her research about the Jewish Orphans Home of New Orleans at the society’s 2017 conference in Cincinnati.
Trestman, who was orphaned at age 11, grew up in New Orleans as a beneficiary of the Jewish Children’s Regional Service. Trestman attended the Isidore Newman School under the spirit of its founding charter to educate Jewish orphans.
Trestman is a former special assistant to the Maryland attorney general, where she started her 30-year legal career in 1982. She has taught law at Loyola University of Maryland’s Sellinger School of Business & Management, where she earned her MBA. Trestman twice received the Attorney General’s Exceptional Service Award and, in 2004, was named Isidore Newman School’s Distinguished Alumnus.
A former trustee of Goucher College, she currently serves on the board of Goucher’s Prison Education Partnership. She and her husband, Henry Kahn, a partner with the law firm of Hogan Lovells, live in Baltimore. They have two grown children, Helene and Eli.
Cost is free for DJHS members and $10 for non-members. RSVP at http://bit.ly/DJHSLectureSeries.

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Dallas Doings: IEngage, Reagan Dinner, JWV Panel, Akiba Cougars

Dallas Doings: IEngage, Reagan Dinner, JWV Panel, Akiba Cougars

Posted on 22 February 2018 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
from submitted reports


IEngage’s Elana Stein Hain briefs Dallas audience

On Feb. 5, the Dallas Community iEngage Initiative welcomed Hartman Scholar Dr. Elana Stein Hain for a community lecture at Congregation Shearith Israel. Dr. Stein Hain, who brilliantly addressed the topic “On American Jewry’s Israel Conversation: Between Prophetic and Rabbinic Politics,” is scholar-in-residence and director of faculty at the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America. Stein Hain earned her doctorate in religion from Columbia University, and is a graduate of the Yeshiva University Graduate Program in Advanced Talmudic Studies and the Cardozo Interdisciplinary Fellowship in Jewish Law and Legal Theory. She has served as clergy member at Lincoln Square Synagogue and The Jewish Center, and as a member of Wexner Institute faculty. She co-founded the Orthodox Leadership Project (OLP) to support female leaders working in the Orthodox Jewish community, and was recognized by The Jewish Week in its inaugural “36 under 36” as an emerging Jewish leader.
The Dallas community iEngage Initiative is a grassroots consortium (comprising Adat Chaverim, Anshai Torah, Beth Torah, Shearith Israel, Temple Emanu-El, Temple Shalom and the JCC) and is a direct outgrowth of Rabbi Donniel Hartman’s powerful talk in Dallas in May 2017. The Shalom Hartman Institute’s work on transformative thinking and teaching addresses some of the major challenges facing the Jewish people in Israel and around the world and encouraged a group of local rabbis and educators to gather and plan a communitywide approach to Jewish values–based education about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
Using the Hartman Institute iEngage materials, the consortium has created a context for genuine Israel engagement across denominational, generational and geographic divides. In October, 100 students began studying a 12-week curriculum together with five rabbis in three locations across our community. Current faculty are Rabbis Nancy Kasten, Michael Kushnick, Andrew Paley, Adam Roffman and Elana Zelony.
The consortium will be meeting soon to plan future course offerings.

— Submitted by
Rachel Weiss Crane


Reagan Day Dinner speakers share positive remarks toward Israel

Diane Benjamin, Republican Precinct #2021 chair for Preston Hollow, hosted a table at the recent Reagan Day Dinner with special guest and keynote speaker, Vice President Mike Pence.
Senator Ted Cruz spoke as well. Diane, who is also president of the Texas Region of Bnai Zion Foundation, was touched when Senator Cruz recalled that his father, Pastor Raphael Cruz, was also a former honoree of Bnai Zion, for his special friendship with Israel, as a strong Christian Zionist. The event was a successful fundraiser for the Dallas area GOP. The Dallas County GOP chair, The Honorable Missy Shorey, also announced her pride in her husband, Lt. Colonel (Ret) Marc Himelhoch, who is a member of the Dr. Harvey J. Bloom Post #256 of the Jewish War Veterans of the USA, currently a pilot for Southwest Airlines, but formerly having flown F -16 aircrafts for the USAF. Pastor Nancy Cole commented on how wonderful it is to share love for Israel and political passions as well as strong convictions for the welfare of our country. Diane appreciated the opportunity to host dear friends and strong Christian Zionists who are true leaders of their flock in deeds as well as words.
Seated at Diane’s table were distinguished guests who were former honorees of Bnai Zion Foundation, Pastors Larry and Tiz Huch of the New Beginnings Church in Bedford, Texas, along with Pastor Nancy Cole and former Bnai Zion honoree and area representative of American Friends for a Safe Israel (AFSI), Ann Stacy, and her husband, John. Additionally, Diane’s table guests included Dr. Lionel and Gloria Reiman and Raphael and Yaffa Bloch. Vice President Pence spoke to a captive audience of over 1500 and received a standing ovation when he mentioned the commitment of President Trump to move the United States Embassy to Jerusalem.

— Submitted by
Diane Benjamin


Plano’s Rosenfield on JWV panel

While in Washington, D.C., at the Jewish War Veterans National Executive Committee meeting, members of the Dallas/ Fort Worth delegation were surprised to see Plano native and member of Post 256 Dan Rosenfield as one of the panelists discussing Jews in the military and issues surrounding them. The four panelists consisted of active duty member Dan Rosenfield (son of Andi and Stuart Rosenfield), a female chaplain, a wife of an active duty member, and a member transitioning out of active duty. Dan graduated from Texas A&M in May 2017. At A&M, he was a member of the Corps of Cadets, Hillel president, Student Government Association executive vice president, and a founding member of AEPi and Aggie Students Supporting Israel. He is a public affairs officer for the U.S. Air Force and is stationed at Ellsworth Air Force Base in South Dakota.

— Submitted by
Sandra Cantor

 

Akiba Cougars take girls’ and boys’ TAPPS titles

What a season for Akiba hoops! Seventh- and eighth-grade girls’ and boys’ basketball teams swept the TAPPS 3-AAA playoffs recently, taking home the district championships.
This marks the second year in a row that the girl’s team won the district championships. This year, the girls were in fourth place in the district before they beat The Covenant School and clinched the top spot. Following the girls’ game, the boys celebrated their undefeated season with a championship game win over Ovilla Christian School.
“We are so proud of the amazing accomplishments of both our girls’ and boys’ teams,” said Tammie Rapps, head of school at Akiba Academy. “Yes, they won and that’s exciting. What’s even more exciting is both teams’ amazing display of teamwork and sportsmanship.”

— Submitted by
Sara Mancuso

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Beth Torah names Robyn Rose Torah Fund Honoree

Beth Torah names Robyn Rose Torah Fund Honoree

Posted on 15 February 2018 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
from submitted reports

Robyn Rose has been named this year’s Torah Fund Honoree by the Sisterhood of Congregation Beth Torah. Her choice as the 25th annual awardee marks double milestones for the annual event of 2018: It’s the first time two family members have received this award — and the other is Robyn’s mother, Esther Cohen, the first woman ever to be so honored!
As Robyn receives her well-deserved applause, there will also be special recognition of Esther, who stood in that same place when the event made its debut back in 1994. Both have outstanding histories of service to Sisterhood and the Congregation.
The Cohen family moved from Montreal to San Antonio for husband and father Nat’s job relocation in 1979, moving again to Plano in 1984, and immediately becoming active at Beth Torah. Nat is a past president of the Congregation; Esther founded and directed its first preschool, and has shared the Sisterhood presidency with her daughter for the past three years. Both women have also served long terms on the Beth Torah Board.
While excelling in speech and debate at Plano Senior High, Robyn was also Beth Torah’s United Synagogue Youth president, and then was active in Hillel at Emory University. After returning to Dallas with a business management degree, she worked in sales for a hotel company and continued her synagogue involvement as its BBYO advisor and founder of a young singles’ social group. She later earned her MBA at UT/Austin, where she wrote the business plan for the Greater Austin Sports Foundation. And she was granted a “pay-per-call” advertising patent 10 years ago!
Coming back again to Dallas, Robyn was in marketing with Verizon when she spearheaded a major singles’ event for the JCC. But it wasn’t there that she met her future husband: That happened “on a blind date,” she says, “set up by his grandmother and an old friend of my family. Both women were living in the same San Antonio retirement home!” After marriage to Hunter Rose, she founded a young couples club at Beth Torah. Today, Hunter is active in its Men’s Club, co-fielding a team in the annual Kosher Barbecue Competition and working on the event’s publicity.
Son Dylan, born in 2003, became a bar mitzvah at Beth Torah; younger daughter Ilana is now anticipating her bat mitzvah there. Both are active in the synagogue’s youth programs, Dylan in USY, Ilana in Kadima, and in the shul’s Learning Center. Dylan attends Plano ISD Academy High School, Ilana is at Schimelpfenig Middle School, and their father advises on communications and websites for both.
The Roses live in Plano and have two area Ben and Jerry’s; Robyn also consults with businesses, advising on communications, internet marketing, website building and on-line advertising. Together, the family enjoys murder mysteries, board games, vacation travel, and their two dogs: Shihtzu “Matzah” and Maltipoo “Dreidel.”
This year’s Beth Torah Sisterhood Torah Fund Luncheon (milchig) will begin at noon on Sunday, March 4, at the Crowne Plaza, 14315 Midway Road, Addison. Cost to attend is $40 per person, plus an $18 minimum deductible contribution to the Torah Fund, which supports, through the Women’s League of Conservative Judaism, five programs for the training of rabbis and Jewish educators at institutions in New York, Los Angeles, Jerusalem, Buenos Aires, and Potsdam, Germany. Donations at levels of $180 (Benefactor) and $200 (Guardian) also cover luncheon costs for family members.
Following long tradition, last year’s Torah Fund Honoree, Stacey Clark, is in charge of this year’s event; all past Honorees make up her committee. For further information and reservations, contact Torah Fund Chair Elaine Scharf, 972-307-3521, ebscharf@verizon.net.

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J to host Fiddler Family Sing-Along Feb. 19

J to host Fiddler Family Sing-Along Feb. 19

Posted on 15 February 2018 by admin

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
from submitted reports

 

 

Since 1964, Fiddler on the Roof has left audiences singing some of its most memorable songs including Matchmaker, Matchmaker and Sunrise, Sunset. On Monday, Feb. 19, the whole family is invited to The J for a free sing-along to this iconic movie musical. The event is a precursor to the J Performing Art Space (JPAS) production of Fiddler on the Roof JR. featuring two different casts of children and young adults ages 6 to 18 years old running March 8-25.
The Fiddler on the Roof Sing-Along will be held 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 19, at The J, 7900 Northaven Road in Dallas. The film begins at 5:15 p.m. and lyrics will be subtitled on the screen. Admission is free and light dinner fare from Kosher Fresh will be provided, however, RSVP is required at http://bit.ly/2ssETOn to ensure space.
Fiddler on the Roof JR. is a witty and poignant tale about the struggle of one father to maintain his religious convictions in the face of a changing world with the help of his family and five daughters. Central themes in Fiddler on the Roof JR. revolve around traditional ways being shaken by new thinking, longstanding beliefs being challenged by young minds and families needing to decide between acceptance and rejection. These are the same issues that are challenging our world today. It’s a current reminder of today’s times and how each and every one of us are affected in some way or another, no matter our religion or ethnic background.
“At its core, Fiddler is about tradition and how tradition shapes our families and our lives,” said Alise Robinson, director of The J Performing Arts Space. “It is a story that captures the essential human longing for love, community, success, freedom, family and meaning.”
Fiddler on the Roof JR. will be performed at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 8; at 8 p.m. Saturday, March 10; at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 11; at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 22; and at 2 and 6 p.m. Sunday, March 2, in Zale Auditorium. Tickets are $18 for adults and $12 for children and can be purchased at http://bit.ly/2BuFBxE.

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Dallas Doings: Shabbat together, Christmas mitzvah

Dallas Doings: Shabbat together, Christmas mitzvah

Posted on 18 January 2018 by admin

Photo: Steve Krant JWV and JWV Auxiliary volunteers posed beneath the large American flag in the VA’s atrium after a job well done! The JWV Post 256 assembled and delivered more than 200 gift bags to patients at the VA on Christmas Day.

Photo: Steve Krant
JWV and JWV Auxiliary volunteers posed beneath the large American flag in the VA’s atrium after a job well done! The JWV Post 256 assembled and delivered more than 200 gift bags to patients at the VA on Christmas Day.

Compiled by Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Shabbat Together for your Munchkin

Temple Shalom Munchkin Minyan will convene Shabbat Together for the first time this year, at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 19. The program always includes singing, dancing, story time and challah.
Saturday morning programs add a delicious child-friendly oneg. For more information contact Jen Arndt and Michelle Falk, Young Family co-chairs, at youngfamilies@templeshalomdallas.org. Additional dates are 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 17; 6 p.m. Friday, March 16; 10:20 a.m. Saturday, April 21; and 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 19.
All families with children ages 6 and under are welcome.
— Submitted by Lisa Rothberg

JWV’s Christmas mitzvah

Christmas Day morning found more than 30 members and family of JWV Harvey J. Bloom Post 256 and its Ladies Auxiliary volunteering at the Dallas VA Medical Center.
The group was on a mission to bring cheer to veterans hospitalized during the holidays. Many have little or no family to keep them company on Christmas Day. JWV’s volunteers bring each veteran a gift bag stocked with snacks, wearables, stationery and other useful items — many donated by local merchants. Perhaps most importantly, they bring a smiling face and some conversation to brighten their day.
More than 200 gift bags were distributed to patients, as well as to families at Fisher House — a nearby facility, similar to Ronald McDonald House, offering free temporary lodging to families while their loved ones undergo medical treatment.

 

 

*****

 

Diamonds and Dice

Congregation Anshai Torah recently celebrated and honored Stuart Blaugrund, one of its founding members, a devoted supporter, amazing adviser and good friend.
— Submitted by Deb Silverthorn

 (Left to right) Melanie, Michael Kerner, Stuart Blaugrund, Bari Golin-Blaugrund, Louann Leeds-Pranses and Emily Blaugrund Fox

(Left to right) Melanie, Michael Kerner, Stuart Blaugrund, Bari Golin-Blaugrund, Louann Leeds-Pranses and Emily Blaugrund Fox

(Back row, left to right) Brad Welcher, Debbie Cohn, Gretchen Edwards, Harvey Swento, Amy Gross, Shawn Frank and Cynthia Brooks; (front row) Bethany Last, Kim Velevis, Jennifer Hersh, and Kimberly Mabel

(Back row, left to right) Brad Welcher, Debbie Cohn, Gretchen Edwards, Harvey Swento, Amy Gross, Shawn Frank and Cynthia Brooks; (front row) Bethany Last, Kim Velevis, Jennifer Hersh, and Kimberly Mabel

 

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Dallas Doings: Ever wonder how ONE Night came about?

Dallas Doings: Ever wonder how ONE Night came about?

Posted on 11 January 2018 by admin

Stephanie and Dan Prescott with Seth Meyers, the featured performer at ONE Night 2016

Stephanie and Dan Prescott with Seth Meyers, the featured performer at ONE Night 2016

Dan Prescott with Jim Gaffigan, who brought down the house at ONE Night 2017

Dan Prescott with Jim Gaffigan, who brought down the house at ONE Night 2017

Prescott explains origins of event

By Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Excitement is building for the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas’ ONE Night, Sunday, Jan. 28. This year’s event will feature hilarious comedian Howie Mandel with musical guests the Maccabeats. For the third year, SMU’s beautiful McFarlin Auditorium will be the backdrop for this not-to-miss free (there is a minimum suggested pledge to the Federation) community event (doors open at 6:30; the program starts at 7:30). Having attended my fair share of Federation Women’s Events, I wondered how ONE Night evolved. I caught up with Dan Prescott, who was the sitting Federation board chair two years ago when ONE Night debuted.
TJP: What was the inspiration for having one fundraising event for the community?
DP: There were a few reasons:

  • 1. Fundraising is important and needs to happen but there is no reason it can’t be fun and enjoyable.
  • 2. We have so many factors in our world that try to divide us, to create rifts and split us by age, by gender, by religious affiliation and brand, and isn’t it nice when we can find reasons to join together, to create one strong vibrant community and show how strong and successful we can be and how wonderful when across our demographic we can pull together.
  • 3. Partners wanted events they can attend together.

TJP: How do you decide on the talent?
DP: I thought there is enough in the news and on the airwaves that makes us concerned and sigh, comedy is a break. Also with comedians no one is excluded; Reform, Conservative, Orthodox all can attend.
TJP: What have you learned from the previous two events?
DP: They are not easy and people have significant expectations. People like SMU, and profanity is not necessary. We learned that it takes a village to get the word out and for folks to sign up. Also that each year we learn from the previous year’s efforts.
We are learning to make our case more impactful and our asks more effective.
TJP: Do you think men and women miss having an event to call their own?
DP: Maybe and they may come back at some point. These events have shelf lives. Men’s and Women’s events got a little tired. That said, I can see a time when they will come back. It is interesting how other communities are following our lead. Dallas leads on so many things.
TJP: It seems like everyone is doing a comedy show now. Do you think this is a trend?
DP: Don’t know but if it is, we started it! Comedy, as long as it is at no one’s real expense, is needed in this world. Especially during these troubling times.
There is still time to register for ONE Night at www.jewishdallas.org/onenight. This event is free to attend thanks to the generous support of underwriters and presenting sponsor, BB&T.
As this is the largest fundraising event for the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, attendees will have the opportunity to make their commitment to the 2018 Annual Campaign. Attendees 31 years of age and older will be asked to make a suggested minimum pledge of $365. Attendees 30 years of age and under will be asked to make a suggested minimum pledge of $180 to the 2018 Annual Campaign.
Event chairs for the evening are Angela Aaron Horowitz and Doug French, Jolie and Michael Newman and Natalie and Michael Waldman.

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Dallas Doings: New chapter for men’s book club: women

Dallas Doings: New chapter for men’s book club: women

Posted on 04 January 2018 by admin

Group renamed to Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Bob Weinfeld is turning the pages of his Guys’ Night Out book club to a new chapter that not only invites, but also always includes women to participate. The group is now called the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club.
The all-inclusive group will welcome author Chuck Friedman, author of Just Call Me Mr. Lucky: An Ethical Will Entwined in an Autobiography, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 16, at the Aaron Family JCC.

(left to right)  Jerry Levin, Bob Weinfeld, Ken Parker, founded the Guys’ Night Out Book of the Month Club with the late Fred Fisher (far left). The club, which meets at the Aaron Family JCC has been renamed the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club.

(left to right) Jerry Levin, Bob Weinfeld, Ken Parker, founded the Guys’ Night Out Book of the Month Club with the late Fred Fisher (far left). The club, which meets at the Aaron Family JCC has been renamed the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club.

“We Jews are the ‘People of the Book,’ the men and women too, and we’re excited to include — and we look forward to having — the ‘gals’ join us on a regular basis. This has been a great group since 2002 and I know it can only get better,” said Weinfeld, program organizer. “It will be wonderful to hear their reviews and discussions.”
The new schedule begins with first-time author Chuck Friedman sharing his Just Call Me Mr. Lucky; An Ethical Will Entwined in an Autobiography. The book, which began as notes to his family, including sons Gus and Paul and his three granddaughters — to whom he dedicated the book — morphed into a bound bounty of advice and lessons he’s learned in his 80-plus years.
Friedman calls himself “lucky,” sharing life for 55 years with wife Ety and their sons. Enjoying good health and magnificent experiences along with both failures and successes during three different careers, the Minnesota native started as an engineer, then went from investor to president and CEO of Information Dynamics Corporation, then became a real estate professional, forming Bachman Construction Company. Looking back on it all, he put pen to paper to create an ethical will. What ensued, and the process of publishing the tome, has made for more memories.
“There’s a million books published this year and mine is one — that’s something,” said Friedman, who along with his wife has been a member of Congregation Shearith Israel for 50 years. “I wrote about how I hoped my family would live, what I’ve tried to do, and to teach them something about living a proper good life. I thought the lessons could help others too.”
It was Marlene and Fred Fisher, of blessed memory, who suggested to Weinfeld the idea of a men’s book club — something women in the community were already enjoying. Put a bug in Weinfeld’s ear and be sure he’ll act with even the slightest plan in sight.

Chuck Friedman, here with wife Ety, is the featured speaker at the first – now revised edition – to include women, of the now “titled” Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club at the Aaron Family JCC on Jan. 16.

Chuck Friedman, here with wife Ety, is the featured speaker at the first – now revised edition – to include women, of the now “titled” Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club at the Aaron Family JCC on Jan. 16.

“I thought it was a great idea and in a couple of weeks Fred, Jerry Levin, Ken Parker and I met and off we were,” said Weinfeld. “We started with Seabiscuit and haven’t stopped reading, covering 175 books.”
“Bob’s a magnet and anything he’s involved in is successful. I love walking by the meetings where you can hear the enthusiasm. It’s one more way the J opens its doors for learning, connections and community building — it’s what we’re about,” said Artie Allen, the J’s CEO. “The more inclusive, the better and we’re thrilled to have more people coming through our doors.”
For Myra Fischel, whose husband Bert has participated in the club for years, opening the gateway for the ladies is exciting. “The guys have always had a good time and whenever we’re invited, it’s been enjoyable,” she said, noting she and Bert are considering reviewing a book together. “I think we might lighten it up a little, but I like that we’ll be introduced to books we maybe wouldn’t otherwise appreciate.”
That the club is multigenerational — with Jews from all congregations and the unaffiliated too — is another positive for Fischel. “It’s nice to meet new people,” she said. “Bob is a super planner with more energy than anyone I know. If he’s leading the trail, it’s going to be a good ride.”
Brenda Nibert, who’s known Weinfeld for a while but never attended the programs, echoes that he’s a “dynamo and everything he plans is a success.” His record intact, at The Legacy at Willow Bend, where Weinfeld is dubbed “the Mayor,” he founded an in-house book club and that facility’s library, now with thousands of rotating books. “I’ve been involved in many areas of the community, including other book clubs as I love to read constantly, but I’m looking forward to whatever Bob instigates,” Nibert added.
The Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club events are open to the public and free of charge, with each review and discussion sweetened with socialization and snacks. For more information, email Bob Weinfeld at robert.weinfeld@tx.rr.com.

 

*****

 

2018 schedule

Feb. 20: A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order and World Order
March 20: The Life and Afterlife of a Jazz Legend, Bix Beiderbecke

Dallas resident and first-time author Chuck Friedman will share his Just Call Me Mr. Lucky; An Ethical Will Entwined in an Autobiography at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 16, at the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club at the Aaron Family JCC.

Dallas resident and first-time author Chuck Friedman will share his Just Call Me Mr. Lucky; An Ethical Will Entwined in an Autobiography at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 16, at the Guys’ and Gals’ Book of the Month Club at the Aaron Family JCC.

April 17: Lucky Bastard: My Life, My Dad, and the Things I’m Not Allowed to Say on TV
June 19: Schmucks: Our Favorite Fakes, Frauds, Lowlifes and Liars
July 17: The Mind of Egypt: History and Meaning in the Time of the Pharaohs (a melding of fiction and nonfiction titles)
Titles for Aug. 21, Oct. 16, and Nov. 20 are to be announced, and there are no meetings in May, September and December.
While most events are hosted at the JCC, there is discussion of occasional programs to be held at The Legacy at Willow Bend.

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Sisterhoods invite Repp to tell his story

Sisterhoods invite Repp to tell his story

Posted on 27 December 2017 by admin

Holocaust survivor will discuss book at Jan. 7 luncheon

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Reflection, reconnections, and the relishing of friendships new and old are certain at the 2018 IntraFaith Sisterhood Brunch. This year’s luncheon will be hosted by Temple Emanu-El’s Women of Reform Judaism at 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 7, and catered by Simcha Kosher Catering. The featured speaker will be community member and author Jack Repp.

Photo: Deb Silverthorn Jack Repp will speak at the 2018 IntraFaith Sisterhood Brunch at Temple Emanu-El. Repp (center), here with event Honorary Chair Sarah Yarrin, has told the story of his life in his recently published Dreams & Jealousy, his story as told to Rabbi Dan Lewin (right).

Photo: Deb Silverthorn
Jack Repp will speak at the 2018 IntraFaith Sisterhood Brunch at Temple Emanu-El. Repp (center), here with event Honorary Chair Sarah Yarrin, has told the story of his life in his recently published Dreams & Jealousy, his story as told to Rabbi Dan Lewin (right).

“Sisterhoods across the country connect, advocate, and act and Temple Emanu-El’s WRJ couldn’t be more thrilled to host this year’s gathering,” said Celia Rose Saunders, co-chairing the event with Elise Mikus and Sue Weiner and Honorary Chair Sarah Yarrin. The co-chairs are excited that the event is open to both women and men (ages 15 and over), hoping to see the generations represented.
“Everything that Sisterhood stands for is meaningful and to have Jack Repp as our guest, a man we honor, admire and really love so dearly, here to share his own story that is so important, is a gift to us all,” Saunders said. “We’ve opened the event to men and women and to teens, and we’re bringing in Simcha Kosher Catering hoping those from all the congregations, and those who are unaffiliated as well, will join us together — as one — as Jews — to experience and strengthen what we know as community.”
Each Sisterhood IntraFaith Luncheon, this one the 15th annual affair, is hosted by a different Dallas-area congregation, bringing together the members of the sisterhoods of all branches of Judaism. The women of each chapter create the program and menu, and coordinate the afternoon with previous event themes related to cooking, the environment, the history of Jews in Texas, the arts, career planning and more.
“Sisterhood is about our heritage and an incredible forum for friendships and connections at the many ages and stages of life,” said Rachelle Weiss Crane, who serves as Temple Emanu-El WRJ co-president with Kay Schachter. “The relationships that are built are treasures and the platforms of issues, of youth, education, social action, world Jewry and more cross the lines of the branches of Judaism and are concerns to all of us as Jews, as women and as Jewish women.”
Repp, known for speaking to groups large and small throughout the community, will reflect on his experiences during the Holocaust as shared through the publication of his book Dreams & Jealousy; The Story of Holocaust Survivor Jack Repp as told to Dan Lewin. After his lecture and a question-and-answer session, Repp will sign copies of his book, available on Amazon and which will also be sold at the event.
“I started my life as Itzik Rzepkowicz in Radom, Poland and now I get to tell my story to children and adults, in schools and in museums, and here in the temple that I love,” said Repp, who is excited about speaking to the intrafaith sisterhood audience, and this the rare occasion for men to share in the celebration. “I am so glad that this program is open to everyone in the community. To me, if you believe in God, you are a religious person and it isn’t about Reform or Conservative or Orthodox. I was born twice — once to my parents, and once again when I was 15 and instead of going to the crematorium, I went to the other line. God has watched over me all my life and everything to do with Him has turned my life in a positive direction.”
Repp’s struggle and survival are the focus of the book that tells his story. Just 69 pounds and 99.9 percent dead when liberated, he is grateful — and amazed — to have still had his mind. “I’m not educated but I can recall 70 years ago like this morning — my marbles are working. At 94 years young, I don’t want to get old,” said the 44-year-long business owner who has remained in the same house for 58 years — always resilient, with one foot forward moving after the next. “You must depend on God. He works in mysterious ways. I want people should know the truth, accept what happened, and do their part so it doesn’t happen again.”
Immigrating to Greenville, Texas, where he had family, Jack and his wife Esther (later known as Edna), of blessed memory, raised their family: children Lotty (Peter) Casillas, David (Bobbie) and Stan (Marsha), four grandchildren and recently — a first great-grandchild.
“Jack’s done it all. He’s been a merchant, a smuggler, a spy, and a survivor and he makes lemonade out of lemons like no one I know,” said Yarrin, a past-president of Temple Emanu-El’s WRJ. “To have him speak at Temple, where I’ve belonged since 1946 and he since 1949, a place that is truly my ‘home away from home,’ is so exciting. WRJ makes a huge difference to so many and supports so many and I just love that he’s coming to speak at a program of those who serve the community. It’s what he’s done for so long on his own — and now, we come together. It’s going to be just beautiful and very, very meaningful.”
RSVPs by Dec. 29 are appreciated for the luncheon. Tickets are $20 per person and can be purchased online at tesisterhood.org/brunch or by calling 469-230-5195.

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