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Special ‘bar mitzvah’ at Temple Shalom

Special ‘bar mitzvah’ at Temple Shalom

Posted on 17 August 2017 by admin

Photo: Winn Fuqua Rabbi Andrew Paley will celebrate 13 years, his “bar mitzvah,” at Temple Shalom, with his family (left to right) Debbie, Sammy, Molly, his congregation and the community beginning this Friday, Aug. 18, at 6 p.m.

Photo: Winn Fuqua
Rabbi Andrew Paley will celebrate 13 years, his “bar mitzvah,” at Temple Shalom, with his family (left to right) Debbie, Sammy, Molly, his congregation and the community beginning this Friday, Aug. 18, at 6 p.m.

Rabbi Andrew Paley celebrates 13th year with congregation

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

It’s the “Year of Rabbi Andrew Paley” at Temple Shalom and the community is invited to share in the celebrations of the rabbi’s 13th year. Festivities begin with an Oneg social at 6 p.m., and services at 6:30 p.m., Friday, Aug. 18. The celebration will continue throughout the year, with a Saturday morning bar mitzvah service, Feb. 24, also dedicated to the rabbi’s commitment to Temple Shalom.
At the Aug. 18 service, 1,000 new High Holy Day prayer books, purchased by congregants in Paley’s honor, will be dedicated. Members of the community are invited to share with Rabbi Paley, a “gift of words,” many to be spoken at services throughout the year.
“I could never have imagined the incredibly meaningful and significant journey my career has taken,” said Paley. “From my ordination when the president of Hebrew-Union College, Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, of blessed memory, asked ‘Are you prepared to become a rabbi in the community of Israel?’ until now, I still feel that sense of awe and wonder, excitement and trepidation at the sacred and blessed responsibility of being God’s servant. I see my role and opportunity in the same way I did then, and at the same time very differently.”
Paley is the husband of Debbie Niederman, associate director of the Union for Reform Judaism Leadership Institute and past president of the Association for Reform Jewish Educators, and the father of Molly, a sophomore at Duke University, and Samuel, a junior at Plano Academy High School.
The son of Dr. Leslie and Annette and brother of Steven and Michael, Paley follows family tradition in being a rabbi. His great-grandfather, Eiser Paley, was an Orthodox rabbi. Growing up in Cleveland, Shabbat dinners at his parents’ Conservative home and his involvement in a local Reform congregation’s youth group program made impressions.
“At home, there was always Jewish beauty and love for our traditions. In my youth group, I met kids like me and it was a great social connection, led by young rabbis who were engaging and who took an interest in us,” said Paley. “When I was 17 I had an epiphany during the High Holy Days, realizing that relationship was so important to me, and I wanted to do that for others.”
Paley holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial and organizational psychology from Ohio State University as well as a certificate in marital and premarital counseling and a master’s degree in Hebrew letters from HUC–JIR, where he was ordained in 1995. Before coming to Dallas he served communities in Fairbanks, Alaska; China Lake Naval Air Station; Miami, Florida; and Cleveland.
Paley is a member of the Dallas Mayor’s Task Force on Poverty; the coordinating committee of Faith Forward Dallas: Faith Leaders united for Peace and Justice — a project of Thanks-Giving Square of Dallas; and the Interfaith Advisory Committee of the North Texas Food Bank, as well as a chaplain with the Dallas Police Department (the first rabbi to serve as such in DPD history).
He’s a member of the Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR), a member of the Southwest Association of Reform Rabbis, a member and past president of the Rabbinical Association of Greater Dallas, and an honorary director of the Dallas Hebrew Free Loan Association. Paley is a mentor for CCAR and to HUC rabbinical students and is an AIPAC Leffer Fellow mentor. He serves on the national board of the Sigma Alpha Mu Fraternity; he has edited prayer books — one for Sabbath and one for the High Holy Days — and he’s written numerous articles.
“Rabbi Paley’s warmth for everyone and his presence in good times and bad is a gift. He’s an impeccable teacher, a brilliant teacher of Torah and life, and he infuses his impact by educating and caring in everything he does,” said Josh Goldman, president of Temple Shalom’s board of directors. “He sets an example of living tikun olam, making our congregation, our city, and our world a better place.”
Paley says it’s an honor to have served alongside his team. He calls Rabbi Ariel Boxman an excellent example of love and dedication to serious and creative Jewish education as well as to students and family. He appreciates the laughter and music of Cantor Emeritus Don Croll and his continued loving, committed and indispensable involvement in the congregation. Of Cantor Devorah Avery, he says you cannot find a kinder and gentler soul, and that she reminds everyone of the Jewish teaching, “Whoever sings, prays twice.”
Paley’s memories are vast, including Temple Shalom’s 40th and 50th anniversaries, the commissioning of the Blumin Family Torah, the 100th anniversary of the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, his service to Faith Forward Dallas at Thanks-Giving Square — Faith Leaders United for Peace and Justice, and, with heartfelt recollection, his offering of blessings at the July 2016 Dallas Memorial Service to the Fallen Dallas Officers.
“My dream of 2004 continues to be my guiding light in 2017 — to be a place of genuine and deep caring in our Temple and beyond, becoming a place of meaningful gathering; to nurture and support serious lifelong Jewish study, becoming a place of meaningful learning; and coming together in creative and joyful ways for purposeful, uplifting and soulful prayer, becoming a place of meaningful worship,” said Paley. “I see our ability to significantly contribute our namesake — shalom,  wholeness and peace — to our city and our state, indeed our country, as we courageously advocate for the vision of our world, as we learn in our tradition, ‘The world is sustained by three things: truth, justice and shalom.’ ”

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2nd annual Israel Symposium draws 500

2nd annual Israel Symposium draws 500

Posted on 10 August 2017 by admin

Staff report

Temple Shalom hosted the second annual Israel Today Community Symposium Aug. 5, attracting some 500 participants.
Four keynote speakers — Rabbi Andrew Paley, Technion Vice President Boaz Golany, Detroit’s Russell St. Missionary Baptist Church Reverend Dr. Deedee M. Coleman and pro-Israel activist and Dallas attorney Charles Pulman — each took their turn at the podium throughout the day in four joint sessions. Each brought their own unique perspective to the table, but it was Reverend Dr. Coleman who garnered a standing ovation in her after-lunch keynote. Coleman has made a number of trips to Israel since 2007 through the AIPAC Foundation.

The Israel Symposium would not be possible without Anita Weinstein and Ken Glaser.

The Israel Symposium would not be possible without Anita Weinstein and Ken Glaser.

Keynote Speakers Technion Vice President Boaz Golany, Detroit’s Russell St. Missionary Baptist Church Reverend Dr. Deedee M. Coleman, pro-Israel activist and Dallas attorney Charles Pulman and Temple Shalom Rabbi Andrew Paley

Keynote Speakers Technion Vice President Boaz Golany, Detroit’s Russell St. Missionary Baptist Church Reverend Dr. Deedee M. Coleman, pro-Israel activist and Dallas attorney Charles Pulman and Temple Shalom Rabbi Andrew Paley

“I have come today to let the house of Israel know that you are not alone, you are not alone in your struggles, you are not alone in your prayers, you are not alone in your endeavors to make Israel a free state, one that lives without fear.”
There is a commitment between the Jewish and African-American relationship, said Coleman. She pointed out the long history of Jewish support during the Civil Rights movement and how that relationship had waned at times. “We must come together as one and strive for a better world for us all. … We must walk together and declare that we can do more together than we could ever do apart.”
She stressed that education is the key, as is standing up for what you believe.
“I am clear like never before on what I am called to do during a time such as this. Without question I am a pro-Israel advocate and I am not ashamed to stand for Israel and my Jewish sisters and brothers and I am called to proclaim what I believe:
“I believe that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel.
“I believe that the United States Embassy should be in Jerusalem.
“I believe that not only does Israel have the right, but it has an obligation, to defend itself when being threatened with annihilation. And don’t ever, ever, ever apologize for defending your heritage, your land and your people.”
In between keynote sessions, participants attended four breakout sessions among 30 choices. A new feature of the symposium was a teen program led by Jesse Stock of Stand with Us.
Ken Glaser and Anita Weinstein were lauded throughout the day for their yeoman’s work in putting together an enriching program. Plans are already underway for next year.

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Shearith’s new senior rabbi aims to build portable micro-communities, networks

Shearith’s new senior rabbi aims to build portable micro-communities, networks

Posted on 03 August 2017 by admin

SunshineFamily(080317)sw

By Amy Sorter
Special to the TJP

Ari Sunshine was on a pre-law track at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, when he joined the United Synagogue Youth (USY) on Wheels. He realized two things while on the six-week national teen bus tour.
First, Judaism is portable. “The cool thing I learned on that trip was, wherever you are, you’re bringing your Judaism with you,” he said.
And second, he wanted to become a rabbi.
“Judaism had permeated my life, and I realized it would be fulfilling to share that passion with other people,” Sunshine remarked.
Many years after that epiphany, Rabbi Ari Sunshine is the new senior rabbi at Congregation Shearith Israel in Dallas, and is ready to share his passion for, and portability of, Judaism. Sunshine takes the leadership reins from Rabbi Daniel Pressman, who has served as the congregation’s transitional rabbi for the past year.
In taking on the new role, Sunshine is embarking on some journeys of his own. Born and raised in Potomac, Maryland, the rabbi’s travels took him from Maryland, to Massachusetts, to New York, to North Carolina and back to Maryland. He traveled to Toronto where, at a USY youth convention, met his future wife, Jennifer. “She lived in San Diego at the time. We were both youth workers, and dated long-distance for a year and a half,” Sunshine said. “Then we married, moved to New York, and I started at the (Jewish Theological) seminary.”
Now, for the first time, the East Coast man is in the south-central United States.
“The appeal is the congregation,” Sunshine said, explaining why he accepted Shearith’s job offer. “Shearith Israel has a long, stable and storied history; it’s multigenerational and a strong institution in the Dallas Jewish community.” Also appealing, he continued, were the staff and lay leaders.
While physical travels brought Sunshine to Dallas, he is also journeying from an internal comfort zone. His career background includes positions as youth director and senior USY adviser at Temple Israel in Sharon, Massachusetts and associate rabbi of Temple Israel in Charlotte, North Carolina. For the past decade, he led B’nai Shalom’s congregation in Olney, Maryland. All three congregations are medium-sized, especially compared to Shearith Israel.
“One of the things that is most important to me, in the rabbinate, is that I want to know everyone in the community, and learn and know everyone’s name,” Sunshine explained. “I was wondering how that would work in a congregation with 1,000 families.” After talking to the Shearith leadership, “I thought that, in time, we’ll pull that off,” he said.
It is, in fact, Sunshine’s genuine interest in people and their lives that warmed Shearith Israel’s rabbinic search committee to both him and his wife. “What is unique about Rabbi Sunshine is that when you meet him, he wants to know your name, your spouse’s name, your children’s names, what you did, and why you came to Dallas,” said Gail Mizrahi, who served as Shearith’s congregation president during the rabbinical search. “Later on, he’d remember your name, your wife’s name, your children’s names. He connects at a very personal level, that few of us had ever seen.” That personal connection, Mizrahi went on to say, was important for the congregation.
Even through internal and external travels, Sunshine’s foundation springs from a very strong faith. Calling his upbringing “the poster child for Conservative Jewish living,” Sunshine grew up in a kosher home, in which Shabbat was strictly observed; the family walked to shul every Saturday. His elementary education came through Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School (in Rockville, Maryland); summers were spent with USY’s Ramah Camping Movement.
By the time he entered Brandeis, Sunshine was moving toward a more secular path, majoring in politics, with an economic minor, and an eye toward an eventual law degree. But Judaism was never far away. He was active with Hillel at Brandeis University. And, at one point, he witnessed a debate that hit close to home: the discussion focused on rabbinic school versus law school. “That got me thinking in terms of connections,” Sunshine said. “The Jewish laws made up a huge part of how I was living.”
That thought crystalized into a solid purpose and action during his USY on Wheels tour. “I found it pretty amazing, that Judaism permeates every decision and moment in our lives,” he pointed out.
To that end, Sunshine’s plan is to bring Judaism to the Shearith congregation. He’ll soon be concentrating on getting his wife, Jennifer and two children, Jonah, 14 and Elana, 12, settled. The high holidays are also around the corner. Beyond that, Sunshine wants to focus on building micro-communities, networks within the larger congregation, that can create and live, Jewish experiences.
“We have to be able to engage and empower people in smaller groups and networks,” he said, adding that the process is less about getting people into Shearith Israel’s Douglas Street shul or Levine Academy’s Beit Aryeh at Hillcrest and Frankford. Rather, it’s about programs that will “create a powerful and impactful Jewish experience, that can lead to other Jewish experiences, and more involvement,” Sunshine said. The process will involve reaching out to people in different ways, through different locations, he said, adding that “it’s a journey, as it were.”
And, Sunshine knows plenty about journeys.

 

 

*****

Welcoming Rabbi Sunshine

Shearith Israel will formerly welcome Rabbi Ari Sunshine (center), Jennifer (left), Jonah (far right) and Elana along with new members at a Kabbalat Shabbat Service and dinner at 6 p.m., Friday, Aug. 25. To register and pay for dinner visit, http://bit.ly/2w2EyQd.

 

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New play pays tribute to DHM co-founder

New play pays tribute to DHM co-founder

Posted on 27 July 2017 by admin

By Amy Sorter
Special to the TJP

While growing up, lawyer-turned-playwright-turned-journalist-turned-college-instructor Mark Donald learned bits and pieces about his father’s early life. Donald knew that his dad, Martin Donald, was a Holocaust survivor who also spent time in Canada and Britain during World War II. Donald also knew his father had spent time with British Intelligence, and was in France within days of D-Day, June 6, 1944. And, of course, Mark Donald knew that Martin Donald, who died in 2007, was an important part of the Dallas Jewish community and one of the Dallas Holocaust Museum’s founders.

Mark Donald

Mark Donald

But it wasn’t until the early 2000s that the son acquired the complete story about his father. Donald eventually consolidated his father’s notes and wrote a fictional play that is very loosely based on and inspired by Martin Donald’s life. That play, Magnum’s Opus, will premiere as a staged reading on Aug. 7-8 at the Dallas Holocaust Museum.
In the play, main character Magnum Guttmann reaches out to his estranged family by revealing complete details of his early life, which includes coming of age in Adolf Hitler’s Berlin, then ending up as a British soldier and Nazi hunter.
Though Guttmann and Martin Donald are not the same person, there are similarities. Both came of age in Hitler’s Berlin. Both were members of the British forces. Both lost family in the concentration camps. And, both rounded up Nazis after the end of World War II. Martin Donald, in fact, was part of the British military group that arrested German foreign minister Joachim von Ribbentrop in 1945.
But the comparisons end there. Martin Donald ultimately gave up his career in the military, came to Dallas, and raised a family with his wife Ann, also a Holocaust survivor. Magnum Guttmann remains a Nazi hunter for much of his life, pushing away his family in the process. As such, “I used my father’s story as inspiration for the play,” Donald explained. “But, the play is highly fictionalized.”

Martin Donald

Martin Donald

Interestingly enough, Donald himself is no slouch in the “colorful story” department. Raised in Dallas with sister Florence (former Texas Senator Florence Shapiro of Plano who is the current Dallas Holocaust Museum board chair), Donald received his law degree from Southern Methodist University. While working as a criminal defense attorney, Donald took acting lessons at the Dallas Theater Center (DTC). “Even though I was with a small firm, with a lot of work, the most I could get was four or five trials a year,” he said. “It took a while to feel comfortable in the courtroom, so I thought I’d take acting classes to help with presentation.”

Linda Leonard

Linda Leonard

In addition to acting classes, the DTC offered playwriting classes with a couple of professors from Trinity University. “I liked them, I loved the place, and before I knew it, I was halfway to a degree,” Donald said. He ended up with a master’s degree in fine arts at the DTC through Trinity University, during which time he wrote several plays. Donald eventually moved from law to freelance journalism, winding up as editor-in-chief with the Dallas Observer, until 2011. These days, Donald teaches mass communications, law and ethics, news reporting and feature writing at the University of North Texas.
Even as Donald obtained another college degree, changed careers and raised his own family with his wife Esther, father Martin remained mostly silent about his own past. “There are two kinds of Holocaust survivors,” Donald explained. “There are those who tell their children all about their Holocaust stories. Then there are those who are more reserved.”
Donald’s father would tell him intriguing bits and pieces about his background. Finally, Donald decided he wanted to expand on those bits and pieces, “because I wanted his grandchildren to know the story.” To that end, Donald used family summers spent in Sarasota, Florida to delve into his father’s background, and to tape-record it. “Five or six years before he died, I interviewed him, as a journalist would,” Donald said. “I didn’t want the surface answers. We went deep.” After three summers of intense interviews, Donald had his father’s entire story.
When Martin Donald died in 2007 at age 86, Donald reviewed the tapes, typed them up, and gave the written transcriptions to Martin’s grandchildren. That was the end of it. Or, so Donald thought. “The story still haunted me,” he said. “It wouldn’t let go.”
Busy with his stints at the Observer, then as a UNT professor, Donald had to put his father’s story aside for a time. Then, over a three-year period, he crafted the play. Donald said he chose to fictionalize the story on a historical framework, rather than focusing on blow-by-blow historical facts. “Fiction enables you to explore various types of issues with a lot of depth and emotion,” he explained. “It explores what it’s like growing up as a Jewish boy in Nazi Berlin, what it’s like to go from refugee, to vanquished, to victor.”
Donald hosted an initial reading of the play in January 2017, then moved on to the idea of a staged reading. He thought that, because Martin was one of the founders of the Dallas Holocaust Museum, “If I was going to have a staged reading, that would be the best place to have it,” he said.
Donald, who remains plugged into the Dallas theater community, asked veteran Dallas actor/director Linda Leonard to direct Magnum’s Opus. A casting call took place over Memorial Day weekend, and rehearsals are now underway. “The work is in the pioneering stages, and it’s exciting to see it come to life,” Donald said, adding that he’s grateful to the Holocaust Museum for hosting the event. “I’m humbled that Linda is directing it, that the actors in it are taking the time to work with it,” he continued.
Donald, veteran journalist, playwright and writer, acknowledged that Magnum’s Opus is as close to basing a fictional piece on real-life events as anything else he’s created. “Magnum has been fighting the good fight; it was his way of righting the wrongs inflicted on his parents,” he said. “My father had the same attitude.” So, while Magnum’s Opus isn’t Martin Donald’s exact story, “his spirit is strong within the play,” his son said.
Magnum’s Opus takes place Monday-Tuesday, Aug. 7-8 at the Dallas Holocaust Museum, 211 N. Record St., Dallas. A 6:30 p.m. reception will precede each night’s reading, with a question-and-answer session following the event. The reading is free, but reservations are required. For more information, contact 214-402-6518 or search Magnum’s Opus Staged Reading on Facebook.

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Rabbis with Texas ties on ‘blacklist’

Rabbis with Texas ties on ‘blacklist’

Posted on 17 July 2017 by admin

Israel’s Chief Rabbinate doesn’t trust list to vouch for engaged couples’ Jewishness

By Rick Press
Special to TJP

In 2017, the notion of a “blacklist” — particularly one involving rabbis — seems almost unthinkable.
And that may explain the howls of complaint surrounding last week’s revelation that Israel’s Chief Rabbinate had compiled a list of 160 rabbis — 66 from the United States and at least one from Texas — who, essentially, would not be trusted to vouch for the Jewishness of immigrants wishing to get married in Israel.

Ken Roseman

Ken Roseman

Itim, the immigrant advocacy group that filed a freedom of information request to acquire the names, dubbed it a “blacklist,” and the group’s leader, Rabbi Seth Farber, said it reflects the ultra-Orthodox Rabbinate’s distrust of Jewish communities beyond Israel’s borders.
“It’s telling 160 Jewish communities around the world ….your rabbi is not a rabbi,” Farber told the Associated Press. “The baseline assumption is that no one can be trusted.”
Kobi Alter, a spokesman for the Chief Rabbinate, was in full damage-control mode Wednesday, insisting that the list was not an attempt to delegitimize the rabbis but rather was a reflection of requests that were rejected in 2016 because of  missing documents or technicalities.
“Every case has a different explanation,” he told NPR.
Reactions from rabbis who made the list were mixed: some were perplexed, some defiant, others outraged.
Rabbi Kenneth D. Roseman, rabbi emeritus at Beth Israel Congregation in Corpus Christi, said he was unsure why he made the list but he viewed his inclusion with “a wry smile” and “contempt for the corruption in the Haredi,” the ultra-Orthodox sector of Israeli society that controls the rabbinate.
“The publication of this list will only alienate even more diaspora Jews who want to support Israel,” said Roseman, who served as senior rabbi at Temple Shalom in Dallas for 17 years before moving to Corpus Christi. “Too often, they go through traditional motions, but ignore the essential ethical values of Judaism.”
Roseman was in prominent company. Rabbi Adam Scheier of Montreal, who is close with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, was on the list. So was Daniel Krauss of Kehilath Yeshurun Synagogue in New York, where U.S. President Donald Trump’s daughter, Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, were congregants. (Another former Texas rabbi, Alberto Zeilicovich, was also on the list. The Argentine-born leader of Congregation Beth Shalom in Fair Lawn, New Jersey, was formerly rabbi at Congregation Ahavath Sholom in Fort Worth.) Also, on the list was Houston’s beloved Rabbi Joseph Radinsky of United Orthodox Synagogue.
“I have received a number of congratulatory letters from colleagues, many asking how they could have the ‘honor’ of being on the list,” said Roseman in an email. “When I announced my listing to the congregation (Friday) night, there was applause and approbation.”
A group of 13 California rabbis even sent a letter to the Rabbinate asking that their names be added to the list, as a show of solidarity.

Rabbi Alberto Zeilicovich of Congregation Ahavath Shalom in Fort Worth photographed July 1, 2008. (Photo/ Richard W. Rodriguez)

Rabbi Alberto Zeilicovich of Congregation Ahavath Shalom in Fort Worth photographed July 1, 2008. (Photo/ Richard W. Rodriguez)

Rabbi Brian Zimmerman of Beth El Congregation in Fort Worth was not on the “blacklist,” but he believes the fallout surrounding it should be a cautionary tale.
“We’ve always known that our decisions would be challenged by a very small group in Israel. But ultimately this is about power. It’s not about religion,” said Zimmerman. “This is why you should separate synagogue and state.”
The Chief Rabbinate has sole jurisdiction over many aspects of Jewish life in Israel, including marriage, divorce and burials. And the ultra-Orthodox group has rejected thousands of requests from international rabbis in recent years.
Israeli Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi David Lau said in a letter of apology that “the list’s intention was not to invalidate rabbis, God forbid, but rather to invalidate letters that raised doubts and questions.”
But Roseman and many others weren’t buying that explanation.
He said, if asked, he wouldn’t hesitate to write another letter on behalf of a congregant.
“I’ll tell the truth,” he said, “and if some Haredi in Israel doesn’t like the way I dot my “I” or cross my “t,” that’s too bad.
“The Chief Rabbinate may want to hold the line in opposition to the modern world,” he added, “but that strikes me as effective as if a peewee football team were to play the Dallas Cowboys. They will eventually disappear from power; their days are numbered. as they should be.”

Zeilicovich had an opinion on the matter as well.
“It’s clearly a dividing policy, and it’s very, very sad that the State of Israel is telling a huge part of the Jewish people you are not recognized here,” said Zeilicovich. “I have more religious rights in a non-Jewish country, like the United States, than in my own Jewish country.”
Zeilicovich returned from Israel on Monday and he said tensions were running high iafter the blacklist was released. Conservative and Reform Jews were making their voices heard.
“There was a huge outrage. The fact that rabbis are being discriminated against by the Rabbinate, it is very concerning. And it’s not just the rabbis it’s the Conservative movement. They disenfranchise Jews,” he said. “And who are they, who gave them the power to do that? They’ve got political power. This is a political problem, not a religious problem.”

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Va. mayor to talk career, Congressional shooting

Va. mayor to talk career, Congressional shooting

Posted on 13 July 2017 by admin

Allison Silberberg and her parents Barbara and Al, at the future mayor of Alexandria, Virgina’s graduation from American University. “I absolutely hear my parents belief in me,” said Mayor Silberberg. “They set the example for a life of doing good.”

Allison Silberberg and her parents Barbara and Al, at the future mayor of Alexandria, Virgina’s graduation from American University. “I absolutely hear my parents belief in me,” said Mayor Silberberg. “They set the example for a life of doing good.”

Dallas native Silberberg guiding DC-suburb Alexandria

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, recently made a comment that defines the translation of l’dor v’dor — from generation to generation.
“Only together can we preserve what our ancestors left to us,” she said. “We are all the temporary stewards of this national treasure called Alexandria.”
Silberberg will share her story at 3 p.m. Thursday, July 20, at The Legacy at Willow Bend.

“Life is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world,” said Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, who will speak at The Legacy at Willow Bend July 20.

“Life is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world,” said Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, who will speak at The Legacy at Willow Bend July 20.

Silberberg’s city quickly gained the national spotlight after June 14, when a gunman shot Republican lawmakers at Eugene Simpson Stadium Park. Capitol Police Special Agent David Bailey, Congressional Aide Zachary Barth, Capitol Police Special Crystal Griner, Tyson Foods lobbyist Matt Mika and Representative Steve Scalise, the House Majority Whip, all were injured during the attack. The gunman, James Hodgkinson, died in a shootout with police.
“This has been a shocking time but Alexandria responded with action,” Silberberg said. “We continue to pray for the wounded. To our first responders, who saved the lives of many, there aren’t enough thanks, and to our strong residents, who came out for days offering cool drinks, baked goods and their hearts. You can’t manufacture ‘community,’ and Alexandria has it overflowing.”
Silberberg, a Hillcrest High School graduate with a B.A. from American University and a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of California, Los Angeles, is the daughter of the late Al and Barbara and sister of Dana and Susan. She grew up at Temple Emanu-El and was a second-generation member of BBYO’s Jennie Zesmer chapter.

(left to right) Dana, Susan, and Allison Silberbergs’ futures were in bloom long before their futures were known. Today, Allison is the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia.

(left to right) Dana, Susan, and Allison Silberbergs’ futures were in bloom long before their futures were known. Today, Allison is the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia.

Silberberg says her love for service was taught by her parents, rabbis and a caring community that she calls very special and it’s her parents’ encouraging voices that she feels in her heart. Her mother’s volunteering at her schools, working on political campaigns, including those of Adlene Harrison and Ann Richards, and her appointment to the Texas State Library and Archives Commission set the bar. Barbara Silberberg also shared her example through active membership in both National Council of Jewish Women and the family’s synagogue. Temple Emanu-El’s Rabbi Kimberly Herzog Cohen says Silberberg lives the heart of her heritage.
“Mayor Silberberg exemplifies that value of service we seek to cultivate as Jews, here at Temple and beyond,” said Rabbi Herzog Cohen. “We’re inspired by and grateful for the ways she pursues tzedakah, charity that helps those in need, and tzedek, justice, at the heart of systemic change.”
Silberberg’s career began as a writer and photographer — which could easily be the focus of a chapter in her book, Visionaries in Our Midst: Ordinary People Who Are Changing Our World. The Society for Women’s Health Research commissioned Silberberg to co-author a book and she created a bound legacy in her commissioned memoir And Life Will Be a Beautiful Dream: A Book about Peggy and Alvin Brown. Her writing appeared on PBS.org in conjunction with Ken Burns’ and Lynn Novick’s The War and David Grubin’s The Jewish Americans. Her talents broad, she’s written for politicians and an episode of Mama’s Family.
Silberberg’s career includes an internship with Senator Edward Kennedy; her role as chief editor and chief research assistant for Senator Lloyd M. Bentsen; being the founding leader of Lights, Camera, Action! — a nonprofit to mentor youth as well as grant making to nonprofits; serving on the World Bank’s community outreach grants committee; and serving on the City of Alexandria’s Economic Opportunities Commission, also as its chair.
While leading a monthly community service group called the Film Biz Happy Hour, which she founded to make contacts, have fun and make a difference all at once, more than $50,000 was raised for nonprofits. When she asked to run for office, it was an idea whose time had come. After being Alexandria’s vice-mayor, she was elected to lead Nov. 3, 2015. This April, she was a panelist at the U.S. Conference of Mayors, regarding vacant and abandoned properties and issues of aging.
“It’s about rolling up your sleeves and getting work done, and it’s the work that matters,” said Silberberg. “It’s an honor to see what’s possible, and to be a part of making the possible happen.”
For Bob Weinfeld, who has interviewed more than 50 guests at The Legacy, hosting Silberberg is an honor.
“It’s absolutely a genuine honor to interview Madame Mayor,” said Weinfeld, who will spend the day of Silberberg’s visit celebrating his 91st birthday. “She’s lived a fascinating life and it seems to be more so every day. Our community should be, and we are, so proud of her.”
Weinfeld’s daughter Brenda Bliss, one of many hometown friends with whom she’s close, echoes her father’s esteem of Silberberg.
“Allison is loyal, honest, objective and a good listener. She’s open to ideas while strong in her convictions and committed to the causes that matter to her,” said Bliss, whose friendship with Silberberg spans teenage tennis court matches and BBYO experiences, as well as the years they both attended graduate school in Southern California.

(left to right) Sally Waxler Oscherwitz, Caryn Statman Kboudi and Allison Silberberg, now Mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, when the threesome were BBYO best friends.

(left to right) Sally Waxler Oscherwitz, Caryn Statman Kboudi and Allison Silberberg, now Mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, when the threesome were BBYO best friends.

“Allison has been interested in politics for as long as I’ve known her and she is successful because she wants to fix things and make them better. She’s always wanted to problem solve,” said Bliss. “She’s always been a great friend and I’m so proud of all that she has accomplished.”
For Silberberg, what she’s accomplished, and what she continues to pursue, all of which her friends, family and supporters are proud of, is giving her heart, talent, expertise and dedication each day, serving in a life that she says “is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world.”
For more information about the July 20 program at The Legacy at Willow Bend, or to RSVP, email robert.weinfeld@tx.rr.com.

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Weinsteins’ business in perennial bloom

Weinsteins’ business in perennial bloom

Posted on 13 July 2017 by admin

Petals & Stems celebrates 45 years of flower service

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

For Dotty and Lew Weinstein — and their son Brad — their business has smelled sweeter with every prepared bouquet during the past 45 years.
“The business of Petals & Stems is about special moments — we’ve been a part of thousands of memories. What an incredible business this is,” said Lew, the Weinstein patriarch who opened the doors to Petals & Stems in June 1972.

Submitted photo (From left) Lew, Dotty, and Brad Weinstein have a blooming business in Petals & Stems florist, celebrating 45 years this summer. For most of those years, the family has run their business from the same Montfort Drive storefront.

Submitted photo
(From left) Lew, Dotty, and Brad Weinstein have a blooming business in Petals & Stems florist, celebrating 45 years this summer. For most of those years, the family has run their business from the same Montfort Drive storefront.

With a strong business sense and experience, but a business partner who wilted and left him sole owner, a budding legacy was created.
Always in the same Montfort Drive shopping center, resettling a few doors away at one point, Petals & Stems has a history, and client list, that is lasting. They’ve delivered customer service and stunning floral artistry for generations of families — from baby celebrations to bar mitzvahs and boutonnieres, from weddings to funeral arrangements. Each customer, each posy: precious.
“On countless occasions Petals & Stems made my tables look and smell so beautiful,” said Carol Gene Cohen, whose family has been listed in the Weinsteins’ Rolodex for years. “They did the flowers for four bar mitzvahs, two weddings and more celebrations and dinners. Every arrangement has been stunning.”
Dotty and Lew are the parents of Brad (spouse Keri), Jeff (Ava), and Lori (Grant), and grandparents of Ansley, Ari, Brice, Gabe and Jill. The family’s best vacations, to Colorado, Lake Tahoe, and this year to San Francisco, are for tables of 13.
In 1997, Brad joined his parents, and for the last two decades the generations have worked hand in hand. With more than 20 employees, and a business that continues to blossom, Lew takes care of the bills, receivables, and payroll while Brad handles the day-to-day operations.
“I grew up riding with deliveries, never thinking the store would be my future, but I’ve loved working with my parents. They’re great people, great business owners, and great examples of working hard and providing exceptional care to their customers,” said Brad, noting the family business also included his grandfather Arthur, who was an important part of the team for many years. “Believe me, your florist knows everything — and we love being there for our clients’ every-things.”
When the store opened, the Weinsteins couldn’t get flowers from Europe; now, many are in the store 36 hours after they’ve been cut. From Israel, one of the top 10 floral exporters, the Weinsteins order the popular Gerbera Daisy.
Petals & Stems has weathered grocers, 800 numbers and the internet — all offering flower sales — finding new clientele by providing an online catalogue and partnering with the Teleflora network. Their Rolodex has morphed into email contacts, sharing specials and contests — during this anniversary month they gave away 45 bouquets.
“Service and family always come first,” said Dotty, a former teacher, recalling her children would be in the truck while the couple would clean up after celebrations. “Lew gave birth to the store and has devoted so much to the service part of the business. Local Jewish caterers took us under their wings and wanted to give him the business.”
The Weinsteins’ professional design team has decorated Metroplex homes, hotels and headquarters. During a 1995 Jewish Federation trip to Israel, with 400 Dallasites, Lew and Dotty couldn’t get over how many people recounted the occasions that Petals & Stems had serviced.
Keeping calendars for their clients, reminding them of birthdays and anniversaries, is a touch to success. Carol Gene Cohen made notes of calls she’s received before she had a chance to order. Brad says clients take care of them as well, with cookies and other treats showing up for the floral team on Valentine’s Day and other occasions. Dotty recalls many husbands who’ve called with “thanks for keeping me out of trouble,” also remembering Southwest Airlines bringing lunch to the store. “Imagine the customer buying us lunch,” she said.
Wanting to give back to the ever-grateful community, for almost 15 years the Weinsteins have donated 10 percent of $30 minimum sales, for deliveries, phone orders, simchas, and arrangements picked up at the shop to synagogues purchasers designate. They also hold floral decorating contests with prizes donated to charities chosen by winners.
“Brad keeps bringing new inspiration, vitality and spark to the business,” said Lew, proud that some in the next generation are stepping in to help out too. “He’s tripled our business and, like all of our kids, made us proud. To know that Petals & Stems is where it is, because our family has worked together, is very special to us.”
Never losing the personal Weinstein touch, either Brad or Lew, or both, are always at the store, located at 13319 Montfort Drive. To place an order, call 972-233-9037 or visit petalsandstems.com.

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Helping people find healthy harmony

Helping people find healthy harmony

Posted on 06 July 2017 by admin

Suzy Harmon has written Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, providing the busy person’s guide to harmonious health. Photo: Deb Silverthorn

Suzy Harmon has written Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, providing the busy person’s guide to harmonious health.
Photo: Deb Silverthorn

Harmon’s book provides clarity for ‘whys’ of health

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Dallas resident Suzy Harmon is taking a big bite out of life — a healthy bite — combining her talents and expertise as an Integrative Nutrition Health Coach and author of Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, with advice on how to live a harmonious life.
“I want to know the ‘whys’ of my clients: why do they want to lose weight, why do they want to be healthy, and why do they want to live,” said Harmon, a New York native who made Dallas home in 1996. A former accountant who traded in financial spreadsheets for cookie sheets with healthy treats, she is now making a healthy lifestyle one to enjoy.
“People want to be healthy. They just think it’s much more difficult, expensive, or time-consuming than it really is.”
The wife of Andy and mother of Bradley, Zach and Lindsay, Harmon spent more than two decades as a CPA. Looking back, she notes that she and those around her were more worried about their financial health than their personal health. When her father passed away in 2008, she gained weight, couldn’t sleep, had hair and skin issues and needed medicine to focus and sleep. An online search brought her to the Institute for Integrative Nutrition and, with a “click,” she signed on for a class and up for a life change. That move would enhance her world, that of those around her and for many she’d never met.
Harmon decided to make a difference — believing the dream of a career involving health, nutrition, and overall wellness was within her grasp. Becoming a Certified Integrative Nutrition Health Coach, Harmon created a curriculum that provides her clients guidance in the areas of positive nutrition, lifestyle, relationships, career goals, financial concern and reaching their fullest potential.
Believing and living the mantra “your greatest wealth is your health,” Harmonious Health support comes through in her book, blog, recipes, classes, grocery store tours, lunch and learn events, food demonstrations, and corporate training programs.
“I wrote the book to expand my audience and the response has been incredible,” said the first-time author. “I love the one-to-one working relationship I have with my clients but I also wanted to reach further.”
In Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, an easy read of 143 pages — chapters that are easy to pick up independently — Harmon breaks down the habits of healthy living into five categories related to home environment, eating, body care, cooking, and the mind. It isn’t about homing in on one area that brings success, but respect for caring for one’s total self.
Her website, SuzyHarmoniousHealth.com, teases taste buds with delicious recipes on her blog, guaranteed to ignite the healthy spirit. From Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Meat Sauce to Homemade All Natural Snack Bars, and Green Chile Chicken to Dessert Date Bars, Harmon provides the possibilities that make getting healthy easy, delicious, and a “want to,” rather than a “have to.”
The planning, shopping, and creating is part of the process — memory making she shared first in the kitchens of her mother and grandmother. “There’s nothing wrong with reaching for food for comfort, but there’s everything right in finding it through the act of creating the food, cooking it, and knowing what’s in it,” said Harmon. “Truly, we are fed by aroma, by a beautiful display of a meal, by the prayers that come from us in appreciation for what we have. You won’t find true comfort in a bag of chips — or in a second. My goal is to get more people to enjoy being in the kitchen, cooking real food and showing them how simple it is with a little planning.”
Her approach isn’t focused on just diet or exercise but on an overall education of wellness. “Many of us take the time to read the ingredients of the foods we buy, but how many take a look at what goes into our soaps and lotions, shampoos and other body products?” she said — noting that our skin is one of our largest organs, absorbing all that it’s exposed to.
“We need to know not just what we’re ingesting, but what we’re absorbing, through our skin into our bloodstream.”
In addition to her individual coaching sessions, Harmon has addressed high school students and seniors with the keys from her book and experience, talking to students about how to make healthy tasty choices in the dining hall and the dorm room, and reduce stress, while leaving the “freshman 15” on the table.
“I never expected to discuss many of the issues that come up during my health coaching sessions with clients, but in examining health and nutrition, many deep and personal issues surface that answer many of the questions about happy and fulfilling lives,” said Harmon.
“I’ve become passionate about how healthy living can add vibrancy to our lives. What feeds us, feeds our souls and it’s important to learn how to make the connection for success in our careers, relationships, and our purpose in life.”
For more information about Harmon’s programs or to register for classes, for recipes, or to order Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, visit SuzyHarmoniousHealth.com, email harmonioushealth@sbcglobal.net, or call 214-293-7768.

 

*****

Healthy living
Feeling great is as easy as finding the balance by:
Creating a sacred space in your home
Choosing foods that help you feel your best
Stress reduction and pampering
Cooking meals that taste great and curb cravings
Making time to unplug and relax

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Breaking ground in Midtown

Breaking ground in Midtown

Posted on 29 June 2017 by admin

_DSC1629

First phase underway for new 430-acre Dallas Midtown, which includes demolition of Valley View Mall

By James Russell
Special to the TJP

The much-anticipated Dallas Midtown development broke ground Friday, June 23, at a press event attended by its most enthusiastic backers.
The 430-acre development at the corner of Preston Road includes the site of the shuttered Valley View Mall. It has been in the making since 2009, when then-City Councilwoman Linda Koop brought together various stakeholders to create an urban village linked via existing roads, trails and a trolley system.
Koop is now a Republican state representative whose district no longer is confined solely to Dallas. She was among the enthusiastic officials at the event.
“This development will create a city within a city. With restaurants, shopping, housing and office space, Dallas Midtown will completely redefine this part of Dallas,” Koop said.
Those entertainment destinations include a 183,000-square-foot Life Time Fitness facility featuring residence, working spaces, large aquatic and workout studios. The residential component, called Life Time Living, is a new concept for the health and wellness company. When completed, the Life Time facility will be the brand’s largest in the country. The other anchor is a 10-screen Cinépolis movie theater. The chain is known for its high-quality reclining chairs, full-service bar and gourmet snacks.
Also announced were plans for more than 1,000 apartments, 400,000 square feet of retail, 500,000 square feet of office space and an 18-story luxury hotel. The hotel brand will be announced soon.
The development will ultimately surround Midtown Commons, a previously announced 20-acre park backers call the centerpiece of the development.
“Over 20 acres are being dedicated to create a place for the tens of thousands of people who will be living here as well as our broader community. The Commons will be a place to gather, play, dream, exercise, and learn,” said Jaynie Schultz, a member of the city’s planning commission. “Midtown Commons will be the place for residents north and south to easily and joyfully celebrate the blessing of living in Dallas.”

 Jaynie Schultz spoke at the Midtown groundbreaking. “If we pull together and our corporations and foundations rise to the moment, our children and grandchildren will see Midtown Commons as a second home,” she said.

Jaynie Schultz spoke at the Midtown groundbreaking. “If we pull together and our corporations and foundations rise to the moment, our children and grandchildren will see Midtown Commons as a second home,” she said.

At the groundbreaking was developer Scott Beck, CEO of Beck Ventures, who has been involved since 2012, when his company acquired the Valley View Mall site.
Like others in attendance, Beck noted the project is not just another north Dallas infill site. Dallas Midtown will compete with the city’s northern suburbs, like Frisco and Plano, which are increasingly attracting more corporate relocations.
“We will now have our answer to stop the flight from corporate America to the far outreaches of our northern and western suburbs,” Beck said during the ceremony. “For far too long, city politics have created an environment where instead of encouraging and demanding policy for strong northern and southern sectors of our city, we have enabled and allowed neighboring cities to take away valuable corporate clients from the tax base in Dallas.”
The development also benefits the southern part of the city too. Dallas Midtown is a designated tax-increment financing district, or TIF, a commonly used method for public financing community-improvement developments. The TIF funds a “desperately needed” redevelopment of Southwest Center Mall in South Dallas.
Beck previously told the TJP Midtown would bring billions of dollars of revenue to the region in the next 30 years. Of that, a significant portion will go toward redeveloping Southwest Center.
“Dallas Midtown will become a major economic driver for the city of Dallas. It will strengthen our tax base and help our city lure and retain corporate headquarters. This is an extremely desirable site and this is the perfect way to develop it,” said City Councilman Tennell Atkins, who represents Southwest Center.
The overall impact will not just be the 430-acre development. The entire region will benefit, too. That’s what makes it historic.
“Our family and the Beck Ventures family of companies are honored to be the stewards of Dallas’ most crucial transformational project this century,” Beck said in a statement.

 

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Preserving small-town history

Preserving small-town history

Posted on 22 June 2017 by admin

Corsicana synagogue receives $25,000 grant to maintain 117-year-old structure, p.5

Corsicana spends $30,000 each year to maintain the building.

Corsicana spends $30,000 each year to maintain the building.

By Hollace Ava Weiner
Special to the TJP

The Texas Jewish Historical Society is donating $25,000 to Corsicana’s century-old, onion- domed synagogue, an architectural gem that needs $403,000 to replace rotting wood, upgrade HVAC equipment and install a fire-sprinkler system.

 

Photo: Fort Worth Jewish Archives Corsicana was a thriving city during the first half of the 20th century before urban development soon phased out the town. In its heyday, Corsicana was home to more than 500 Jews, some of whom were familiar with the stained-glass windows.

Photo: Fort Worth Jewish Archives
Corsicana was a thriving city during the first half of the 20th century before urban development soon phased out the town. In its heyday, Corsicana was home to more than 500 Jews, some of whom were familiar with the stained-glass windows.

The city, which has owned and maintained the Moorish revival Temple Beth-El since 1987, is optimistic that the TJHS grant will attract funds from Jewish foundations and individuals, which in the past have contributed little for the landmark’s preservation.
Babbette Samuels, 89, the oldest surviving member of Corsicana’s once-thriving Jewish community, said it was a “miracle” that the TJHS approved the $25,000 grant. “The temple is a monument to Judaism and to this small town,” the octogenarian said, following an emotional discussion and vote at a TJHS board meeting June 11 in Austin. “The city of Corsicana has been taking care of the synagogue all these years and will continue to do so. It just wants financial help.”
The 117-year-old Temple Beth-El is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has a Texas Historical Marker. Although repurposed as a city community center, the worship area —with its stained-glass windows, vintage menorahs and wooden pews — hosts Shabbat services once a month, drawing up to 20 people from miles around.
Dallas attorney Bud Silverberg, who grew up in Corsicana, told the TJHS board, “Temple Beth-El is not just a structure. It represents a part of our Jewish heritage and the lives of Jews living in small towns in Texas and across our great country.”
Since 1980, when Temple Beth-El’s congregation disbanded and its exotic building faced demolition, the local Christian community has rallied to preserve the religious landmark. Initially, a Save-the-Temple Committee staged potluck suppers, applied for grants, and hired a preservation architect to restore the building and reopen it as a community center available for weddings, parties and meetings.
The synagogue, located on 15th Street, is within sight of the Collin Street Bakery, known internationally for its fruitcake. Both landmarks draw tourists from around the world, most recently two Israelis representing the Israel Movement for Reform and Progressive Judaism. The website www.Synagogues360.org describes the building as “a fine example of Eastern European wood and Gothic masonry motifs modified for American frontier construction.”
Corsicana (population 25,000), a rural county seat 55 miles southwest of Dallas, budgets $30,000 annually for the temple’s upkeep. Seven years ago it restored the building’s twin onion-domed towers and three stained-glass windows — which some authorities say were crafted by Tiffany.
British-born Judith Steely, a non-Jew and president of the recently formed Corsicana Preservation Foundation, said local residents often wonder why Jews haven’t contributed toward maintaining this landmark. Last year she convened a meeting of Dallas residents with ancestral ties to Corsicana’s Jewish community. The idea to approach the TJHS for funds came from that meeting. The ad hoc committee plans to draft a formal fundraising plan to tap Jewish institutions and individuals.

he city restored three stained-glass windows seven years ago.

The city restored three stained-glass windows seven years ago.

The city preservation society has also received a $25,000 restoration grant from the Navarro Community Foundation and $1,500 from the Church in the Park, a local Southern Baptist congregation. The Parks and Recreation Department has published a handsome brochure promoting the temple as a unique venue for weddings and receptions.
The distinctive synagogue, with its octagonal towers and keyhole windows, has seating for 150. The main sanctuary has a rose window with a Star of David and two other stained-glass windows depicting matching tablets of the Ten Commandments.
During the first half of the 20th century, Corsicana was a thriving oil, industrial, mercantile and agricultural center. It became home to more than 500 Jews and both a Reform and Orthodox synagogue. During the late-1960s, the younger generation began gravitating to urban areas. Faced with dwindling membership, the Reform Temple Beth-El, unable to afford the upkeep of its landmark building, disbanded in 1980. The Orthodox congregation, Agudas Achim, dissolved in 1999. Its building became a senior citizens center.
Temple Beth-El is the only onion-domed house of worship in the Southwest, and one of a handful across the country. The others include Temple Aaron in Trinidad, Colorado; Congregation B’nai Israel in Butte, Montana; and the Plum Street Temple in Cincinnati. The onion dome harks back to the Golden Age of Spain in Jewish history. Its use in Moorish revival architecture reflected optimism that the American Jewish experience would lead to another Golden Age.
Writing in 1990 about Corsicana’s distinctive synagogue, Texas historian Jane Manaster described it as a two-story wooden structure “fronted by a gabled roof and squat twin towers, each exotically topped by an onion-shaped cupola or dome.” Her article in the East Texas Historical Journal deemed the house of worship “a remarkable ecclesiastical heirloom.”
Renovations on Temple Beth-El have already begun, utilizing funds donated to date. According to Charla Allen, director of Parks and Recreation, restoration work is divided into four phases:

  • Remove existing siding and substrate, install new plywood, weather barrier, and wood siding with trim to match original;
  • Seal dissimilar material junctions with urethane sealant; paint new siding and trim with two coats of acrylic latex paint;
  • Refurbish 24 windows and two doors;
  • Install fire-sprinkler system and up-to-date heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems.

For further information or to make individual donations, contact the City of Corsicana Parks and Recreation Department, 903-654-4874 or www.cityofcorsicana.com.

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