Archive | News

Gift bags soothe sting of patients’ procedures

Gift bags soothe sting of patients’ procedures

Posted on 24 March 2017 by admin

Social media helps thankful woman find thoughtful child

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

The idea that “it’s the thought that counts” couldn’t be more understated than in the expression of a thought that counts 5,354 times — and still is counting! ARI BLUMBERG - BAGS
In just over three weeks Kim Hamilton Hunter’s Facebook post to find and say thank you to 13-year-old Ari Blumberg has been counted — and, at press time liked, loved, or otherwise shared by 2,662 people, and with more than 627 comments — his original mitzvah propelled around the globe.
“I’m going to make this post public in hopes that Mr. Ari (Blumberg) age 13 from the Dallas, Texas area will see this post or someone I know can tell him thank you for me. I want him to know that I appreciated the gift bag during my treatment today! What a kind gesture!,” posted Kim, who, for a gift bag she received, created the thank-you note, and a search for her own local hero, now gone viral.
It was when Kim walked into Texas Oncology-Presbyterian Cancer Center Dallas that her heart first swelled due to the kindness of a stranger. Kim, who is battling metastatic breast cancer which spread to her bones before diagnosis five years ago, makes a monthly, four-hour and 250-mile-plus trek from her home in San Angelo for what she calls “liquid gold,” treatments. She presumed her regular seat was occupied by another patient when she saw a bag on her chair.
There were bags on the next seat and the next so she returned to her chair for treatment, receiving the gift from an unknown heart.
That heart belonged to Ari who wanted to contribute to others — like his Saba (Hebrew for grandfather) Mike Degani — who were receiving chemotherapy treatments. Knowing his grandfather’s trials, Ari wanted to do anything possible to let patients know someone was thinking about them. Ari hand-delivered almost 30 of the 120 bags made to patients, while leaving the rest for later appointments. He received a number of personal thank-yous from recipients.ARI BLUMBERG - kim and family
“I wanted to try to take away some of what makes cancer so terrible,” said Ari. He collected both items and monetary donations to put his gifts together, and with the help of friends and family filled the bags with socks, a notepad and pen, lotion, lollipops, granola bars, a bottle of water, tissues and chapstick. “I wanted them to be comfortable, I wanted to take away the bad taste that chemo can leave in the patient’s mouth and the dryness of their skin. Some of it was just because it would be nice to have.”
“Feb. 23 was a particularly hard day as I didn’t know if my treatments were working. I had been in remission, with ‘no evidence of disease,’ and then I was in terrible pain in my hip. That day I didn’t know where I was with the disease and I was scared,” said Kim. The wife of Matt and mother of 8-year-old Hodge and 5-year-old Holt Allie, she was diagnosed with the disease while nursing her then-10-month old daughter. “I’d had an MRI, and then went to my chair and these bright, beautiful, smiles of bags were everywhere. In my mind, I wasn’t creating a ‘viral moment.’ I was thinking I’d want my kids to do something wonderful like this, and I’d love to say ‘thank you.’”
It took less than 24 hours — and shares and comments from throughout the United States, Israel and beyond — for Kim to connect with Ari, a seventh-grade student at Akiba Academy, the son of Sharon and Marc Blumberg, and brother of Sam and Ayla.
In her Facebook response to Kim’s plea, Sharon explained how she and Ari had delivered the bags the day before while her father was having treatment, also including in her post a photo of Ari and his grandfather.
“Ari is incredibly humble. We’re shocked by the attention because this is just the right thing to do. Ari has learned Jewish, really human, values from school, his synagogue, and his family and he is always about doing the next good thing, taking the energy and building on it, and wanting to help people,” said Sharon, who had many friends from around the globe “sharing” the post to her Facebook page. “Ari’s school is on board about creating a project for the students to help patients at a children’s hospital and there are comments by others who are creating their own projects. Ari’s goodness is the impetus for others to do more on a bigger scale. Any time you can inspire someone to do good, that’s great and if you are doing that at 13, as his parents, we couldn’t ask for more.”
Ari, amazed by the Internet attention brought to his mitzvah project, says he was “just doing what we’re supposed to; it’s now my responsibility as a Jewish adult to live a life of giving to others and perform mitzvot.” Maybe so, but this new teen is taking to heart, and following the lessons of his parents — whose footwear and apparel company Chooze provides training, support, education, and loans to women to start their own businesses — and his brother, whose Paint 4 Peace turned Valley View Mall into a canvas raising money supporting families of victims of terror attacks in Israel. “It’s just what I’ve learned and what I know, but it’s nice to know that it was appreciated and I’m glad other people want to do something good too.”ARI BLUMBERG and Saba
Rabbi Ariel Rackovsky was honored that it was he bestowing blessings over Ari’s bar mitzvah, proud of the young man who spent a year studying to read all of the Torah readings during his service, and proud of the young man who clearly understands the concept of the responsibilities now set before him.
“A mitzvah isn’t a good deed, as it is often defined, but rather a commandment. We are commanded to perform acts of kindness and to sanctify God’s name,” said Rabbi Rackovsky. “Ari’s actions, without his knowing what would come forth, have given so many great feelings. In this time where anti-Semitism is so pronounced, what has happened through his efforts, and literally the sharing of his goodness, is a Kiddush Hashem. He most definitely has sanctified God’s name, and that that is why we are here.”
It may be Ari’s original thought that counts, but it is through his new friend Kim’s push that others know his goodness, and her affinity for him and the Jewish people as a whole keeps getting the counts over and over again. With all the likes and shares, Ari’s story was also shared by JewInTheCity.com and HumansOfJudaism.com.
“I’m not Jewish but I learn Bible and the Old Testament with a friend and I spoke with our pastor’s wife for direction. I’d recently spoken with someone who was raised Jewish who had been talking about how to support Israel and stand with the Jewish community,” Kim said.
That “strength and healing” will soon be something Ari can give through a hug and his in-person charming and genuine smile.ARI BLUMBERG fb post

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Mitzvah made viral

Mitzvah made viral

Posted on 24 March 2017 by admin

Boy’s actions lead to heart-warming moment

BLUMBERG - followup - akibakids

By Deb Silverthorn

It’s almost impossible to describe what the meeting between core souls is like. BLUMBERG followup - families

Those souls, belong to a 13-year-old Jewish boy, and a grown Christian woman, were strangers a month ago. On Thursday morning, March 23, the duo shared a moment at Akiba Academy as seventh-grader Ari Blumberg brought the spirit of a bar mitzvah project to life, and Kim Hunter, one of the recipients of his mitzvah, came to say “thank you.”

As the two first came together, with a brief hug, the assembly of students and faculty on Thursday, March 23,became anything but ordinary. Hunter spoke about her medical experience and how Blumberg’s project caught her at the right moment, in a manner he never could’ve planned.

“I just had an MRI and I didn’t know if maybe the cancer had spread, and I was scared. I walked in for my treatment and went to my chair, and there was this beautiful bag. At first I figured it belonged to someone else but there were bags on all the chairs,” said Hunter, whose husband Matt, children Holt, Allie and Hodge, sister Stacy Sparagna and niece Skotlynn joined her at Akiba. “The first words on the card jumped at me; ‘You are not alone.’ I can’t explain how immediately it went from a terrible day, to an incredible one.”

Hunter, first diagnosed in December 2012, finished the round of treatment and couldn’t stop thinking about the gift during her return home to San Angelo. Her monthly treatments require a five-hour trip, with additional treatments sometimes in Dallas, and others closer-to-home in Abilene. BLUMBERG followup - meeting

“I kept thinking ‘I want to thank this kid.’ I got home, snapped a photo, made my Facebook post public and went to sleep. I woke up to messages from Israel and around the United States and a friend of mine made the connection in less than 24 hours,” she said, never expecting almost 2,700 shares and over 5,300 likes, “loves” and more.

“I’ve had a lot of people praying for me in the last four years and to know now that people in Israel are praying for me? I knew there was something more to it — that a 13-year-old boy in Dallas took the time to care about me is something I couldn’t ever have imagined. When you are selecting mitzvahs, pray about it and see what’s in your heart because you never know who you might impact and the ripple effect.”

Hunter had never heard of the phrase “mitzvah project,” let alone experienced the benefit. Blumberg, whose grandfather Mike Degani is undergoing treatments at the same Texas Oncology-Presbyterian Cancer Center Dallas, was, in the spirit of his March 4 bar mitzvah, inspired by his grandfather to create a mitzvah project to help other patients.

“I saw how hard it was for my Saba and Safta (Hebrew for grandma and grandpa). He had brought home a smaller bag someone had left for him,” said Blumberg, the son of Sharon and Marc and brother of Ayla and Sam. “I wanted something bigger and fuller and I really just wanted to make it easier for patients and for them to know I was thinking about them. I’m glad Mrs. Hunter appreciated it, and it’s nice that people are learning about doing mitzvah projects, but it’s really just what I do, what we are supposed to do.”

Akiba faculty member Sarah Rosen spoke the words of many in the room telling Hunter that it was she who inspired those present that she wasn’t just receiving the goodness and education of what had transpired, but that she was teaching as well. “These children,” she said, “as they move forward in their mitzvah projects for bnai mitzvah, and beyond as they perform mitzvot all of their lives, they will have in mind the meaning and respect that is felt and appreciated and I’m sure you’re example of appreciation will forever be remembered.” BLUMBERG followup - kim name

Akiba’s principal, Rabbi Avi Spodek, presented Hunter with a tzedakah box like those gifted to students on the occasion of their bar or bat mitzvah. He explained the word tzedakah comes from the word tzedek meaning righteous or justice and that fulfilling commandments is for justice, the right thing to do.

One of Blumberg’s classmates, Noa Terenyo, asked Hunter for her mother’s name, explaining that the students pray daily for those who are ill. “We want to keep you in our prayers and hope you’ll be better soon,” she said. To that, with tears welling, Hunter added her name and that of Gayle Hamilton, to the whiteboard.

“I’ve always been taught to stand with the Jewish people and I know that I was put here to be a voice. I promise to keep learning, talking, and teaching others about how amazing the Jewish people are,” Hunter said. “I know God put me where He did.”

There were tears, they were joyful, and in the middle of the Beit Knesset, there was Blumberg’s mom Sharon, at Hunter’s side — the two women a month ago unknown to one another – now support, now friends, now really a new world of family.

“We struggled with what Ari was going to do for a mitzvah project, wanting something that was meaningful and would deeply speak to him,” Sharon said. “Once my father was diagnosed it became emotional and there was a reason for what to do. We became inspired and Ari ran with it.”

“Kim’s presentation inspired all who listened to her message of faith and understanding. Through the story of her medical treatments and living with metastatic cancer, she conveyed her unwavering belief that everything happens for a reason and all is in God’s hands,” said Akiba Head of School Tammie Rapps. “When we teach how our actions matter, and about our Jewish responsibility to be a light unto the nations, it’s sometimes difficult to imagine what those lessons look like. After our meeting, those lessons looked like a blonde 41-year-old mom who has assumed the mantle of spreading goodness and kindness because she’s been on the receiving end of thoughtfulness and compassion.”

Touring the Schultz Rosenberg campus, Hunter was in awe of all the meaning put into the construction and creation by “spiritual architect,” artist David Moss and others involved in the purposeful design.  “This is a special place and I love that from the youngest of the babies, the influence of good, and beauty and kindness, is here,” she said.  “I don’t know if I’ll ever have the opportunity to go to Israel but walking down the corridor, someone explained to me that we were on target with the longitude and latitude to keep walking straight into Jerusalem. I believe in the power of prayer and in the power of healing and I thank you.” BLUMBERG followup - kim & ari

Hunter spoke to the importance allowing others to help when facing a challenge. She had always been on the giving end, helping those in need. When she became ill, she had to learn to receive, to let others in.

Hunter believes wholeheartedly that this experience is not just about an incredible mitzvah project, but the chance for her to take it one step further, and that she vows to educate Christians about the Jewish community. “I absolutely will spread the amazing things you do and how we must stand by you.  I want to stay in touch with you and learn more,” she said, after her talk hugging students and faculty members, many of whom offered baby-sitting and playgroups for her children whenever the family is in town. “I’m really overwhelmed and know that we will forever be entwined. This can’t be explained but I know it is God speaking to me and letting me know I’m not alone on this journey.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Jewish teen from Israel charged with making JCC bomb threats

Jewish teen from Israel charged with making JCC bomb threats

Posted on 23 March 2017 by admin

By Sean Savage
JNS.org

A Jewish teenager with dual Israeli and American citizenship living in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon was arrested Thursday in connection to the wave of more than 100 bomb threats against JCCs and other Jewish institutions across North America since the beginning of 2017.

The suspect, 19, was arrested by Israel’s Lahav 433 police unit in the wake of a months-long investigation by Israeli authorities, who worked alongside the FBI and other international law enforcement agencies. Authorities did not release the suspect’s name Thursday. Additionally, police detained the suspect’s father on suspicion that he knew of his son’s activities.

Jewish leaders meet March 3 with FBI Director James Comey and other federal officials to discuss the ongoing wave of anti-Semitic threats and attacks in the U.S. Credit: Conference of the Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations.

Jewish leaders meet March 3 with FBI Director James Comey and other federal officials to discuss the ongoing wave of anti-Semitic threats and attacks in the U.S. Credit: Conference of the Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations.

Authorities believe the suspect was also behind a bomb threat against two Delta Airlines flights between New York and Tel Aviv in January 2015, the Times of Israel reported.

The JCC Association of North America said Thursday that it is “gratified by the progress in this investigation” and praised law enforcement agencies’ “commitment and leadership.” But the umbrella organization for the community centers added that it is “troubled to learn that the individual suspected of making these threats…is reportedly Jewish.”

During a raid on the suspect’s home, authorities found an advanced computer lab with sophisticated equipment, including voice-altering technology, encryption methods and a large antenna that he likely used to phone and email bomb threats to Jewish institutions in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Israel.

According to Haaretz, authorities confiscated five computers, including the large antennas, which police believe allowed the suspect to use other people’s networks to commit the alleged crimes and throw off investigators. But eventually, police were able to create a profile of the suspect and determine the method to find him.

It is believed the suspect has lived in Israel for several years, and that the IDF refused to draft him “on personal grounds after funding him unfit for service,” Haaretz reported.

The suspect was scheduled to be brought before a Magistrate’s Court in the Israeli city of Rishon LeZion Thursday.

Israel Police spokesman Mickey Rosenfeld said this arrest was part of a coordinated international operation to try to find to find suspects behind the bomb threats.

“This specific investigation was complex in terms of the suspect and its nature, and there was a significant breakthrough in the investigation which led us to make the arrest of the suspect, who lives in southern Israel,” Rosenfeld told the Jerusalem Post.

Rosenfeld added that “he was the main suspect behind the numerous amount of threats which were made to different Jewish communities and organizations around the world.” Investigators, he said, will to continue to “see if and how he was connected to the different Jewish communities in the U.S. That directs the investigation to the American connection. We are looking to see if there was an incident which triggered him to carry out threatening those communities.”

Israeli Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan congratulated police on the arrest and expressed his hope that it would bring an end to the threats against Jewish institutions.

“We hope that this investigation will help shed light on some of the recent threats against Jewish institutions, which have caused great concern both among Jewish communities and the Israeli government,” said Erdan.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, meanwhile, said the Department of Justice “is committed to protecting the civil rights of all Americans, and we will not tolerate the targeting of any community in this country on the basis of their religious beliefs. I commend the FBI and Israeli National Police for their outstanding work on this case.”

Earlier this month, U.S. authorities arrested Juan Thompson, a 31-year-old former news reporter from St. Louis, in connection with eight bomb threats against Jewish institutions. At the time, law enforcement officials said Thompson was not believed to be the main suspect behind the threats, an assertion that is purportedly confirmed by the latest arrest.

Following Thursday’s arrest in Israel, Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said that even though “it appears that the main culprit behind the majority of these attacks has allegedly been identified, anti-Semitism in the U.S. remains a very serious concern.”

“No arrests have been made in three cemetery desecrations [that have occurred in early 2017] or a series of other anti-Semitic incidents involving swastika graffiti and hate fliers,” he said. “JCCs and other institutions should not relax security measures or become less vigilant.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Kosher Chili Cook-Off names new winner

Kosher Chili Cook-Off names new winner

Posted on 23 March 2017 by admin

After several runner-up finishes, Litoff finally wins Kosher Chili Cook-Off

Henry Litoff won his first Kosher Chili Cook-Off

Henry Litoff won his first Kosher Chili Cook-Off

By Sean Shapiro
Special to the TJP

Henry Litoff finally got his chili championship; now he’s going to need a new sign.
Litoff went into the 24th Dallas Kosher Chili Cook-off with a string of second-place finishes dating back to 2014. He had always come close, but hadn’t gotten to hoist and celebrate a title until the judges deemed his as the best beef chili Sunday from a group of 44 entered in the category.
Determined in a blind tasting by the judges, Litoff’s chili edged out the entry from second-place Congregation Shaare Tefilla and the third-place winner from Moishe House.
“It’s exciting,” Litoff said, pausing after having a sip of Champagne and celebrating with the trophy. “I make the chili that I want to eat.
“I know I’m going to have 10, 15 pounds left and I got to give some to my teammates, and they are taking it home to enjoy it,” Litoff added. “I basically cook to my tastes, my teammates. There is no secret; my secret is no gimmicks.”
Litoff said it was a similar recipe to the ones that took second in the past, but this year he really took the simple chili philosophy to heart.
“This year was the most pared-down, simple recipe that I’ve made,” Litoff said. “I tried the least amount of gimmicky stuff. I tried to pare it down to what is the most delicious part, and that’s what I did. No gimmicks.”
While Litoff won the beef competition, the team from Whole Foods Market won the veggie chili title, while Jewish Family Services took second. Five teams were entered into the veggie chili category.
Congregation Shaare Tefilla was crowned the people’s choice for the second straight year. Each visitor at the event was given one gold coin and could vote for their favorite chili.
Organizers now turn their attention to the 2018 Cook-off. That will be the 25th annual event, and the 24th more than lived up to expectations.
In addition to the food, the Mazik Brothers performed a mix of ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s music covers while local vendors had stands set up. The kids were also well entertained with inflatable attractions and a woodworking station.
“It was a beautiful day,” Ed Jerome said. “We host this for the Dallas Jewish community. It’s just great for us to be able to host everybody. We had close to 50 Jewish organizations between the teams and vendors. It’s really a great day for the community.”
The 25th Cook-off already has a date, March 18, 2018 — mark your calendar now — and Jerome said that event will be a big celebration and honor the history of the Cook-off.
Of course, Litoff will be back to try and defend his title.
“As a local Dallas Jew, I was born here (in Dallas) and I’ve been coming here every single year since I think the inception of the Chili Cook-off,” Litoff said. “It’s just a great honor to participate in one of the largest, most inclusive community events that we have.”

 

 

Photos: Sharon Wisch-Ray

Chili cook-off winners

Beef winner: Henry Litoff
Veggie winner: Whole Foods
Beef, second place and people’s choice: Shaare Tefilla
Veggie runner-up: Jewish Family Services
Beef, third place: Moishe House

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

DHM offers 1st look at Wiesenthal

DHM offers 1st look at Wiesenthal

Posted on 23 March 2017 by admin

Museum sponsors opening night viewing of one-man show

By Aaron Greenberg
Special

the TJP

DALLAS — On April 5, Wiesenthal, the award-winning one-man show about famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal, will open at the AT&T Performing Arts Center.
It’s the latest offering in a partnership between the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance and the performing arts center. The museum is sponsoring the four-show run at the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre, part of the Off Broadway on Flora Street Series, but opening night will be a full event.
“We have exclusive access to the theater and play that night, so it will be a wonderful community experience,” said Mary Pat Higgins, the museum’s CEO.
Opening night festivities include pre-show cocktails for ticket holders and sponsors, and a post-show reception with playwright and star Tom Dugan for sponsors. Single tickets for opening night start at $125 and sponsorships start at $1,000.

Submitted photo Wiesenthal is a one-man show depicting famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal.

Submitted photo
Wiesenthal is a one-man show depicting famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal.

“We were looking to do something interesting and relevant to what the museum is about as a fundraising enterprise,” said Mike Richman, executive vice president of revenue for the AT&T center.
“The subject matter, being about the most visible and famous Nazi hunter ever, ties directly into the message and mission of the Dallas Holocaust Museum.”
The one-act show is directed by Jenny Sullivan and runs about 75 minutes. It takes place on the day Wiesenthal retires after nearly 60 years in pursuit of Nazis.
“The concept of the show is that he is with one last group of visitors to his office on the day he is packing away his memorabilia,” Richman said. “It is so poignant, so interesting to see inside the mind of someone who is so single-mindedly motivated to bring these murderers to justice.”
Wiesenthal searched the world for people involved in Nazi war crimes, and tracked down more than 1,000 individuals so that they could be brought to justice. Most famously, he was involved in the capture of Adolf Eichmann, one of the main architects of the Holocaust. Wiesenthal retired in 2003, and died in 2005.
“It is a story of seeking justice not just to avenge, really, the tragedy of Jewish lives lost, but so in the future perpetrators would know there would be people who would pursue justice, as a deterrent for future genocides,” Higgins said.
The two organizations teamed up for a fundraiser a few years ago, a chance for the museum to branch out with the arts community. In 2015, a one-woman show by Mona Golabek about her mother’s experience on the Kindertransport was held at the Wyly. Higgins said it was a wonderful experience, and last year the opening night of Cabaret — set when the Nazis were rising to power — was used as a fundraiser for the museum.
“When we found out they had to opportunity to host Wiesenthal, we were very excited,” Higgins said. “We have exclusive access to the theater and play that night, so it will be a wonderful community experience.”
On opening night, cocktails start at 6 p.m. and the show at 7 p.m. Because the theater will be dedicated to the show that night, Higgins sees it as a chance to learn, mingle and support the museum. For the April 6-8 performances, the show begins at 8 p.m. and tickets start at $39. There will be an information booth for the museum at those performances, too.
Dugan, the son of a concentration camp liberator, has performed in numerous plays, movies and television shows. He has written one-man plays about Robert E. Lee and Frederick Douglass as well.
“The play itself has had a long history,” Richman said. “It debuted a few years ago at Playwrights Horizons in New York, a showcase for smaller theatrical works.
“We are constantly scouting shows to bring to the AT&T Performing Arts Center.
“One of our board members saw it previously and recommended we put it on our calendar. I saw it in New York and loved it.”
Similarly, Florence Shapiro, the museum’s board chair, saw the show last year in Richardson. She praised it to fellow board members, and when they heard it might be coming to town, the museum’s leadership reached out to Richman.
It’s seen as an opportunity not only to help the museum with fundraising, but in its mission of broadening knowledge about the Holocaust. Dugan will spend time doing educational outreach while in town, including a full hour on KERA.
There’s also a study guide available online for educators to use.
“It’s a good opportunity to get the message that always emanates from discussion of the Holocaust about tolerance and kindness toward fellow men,” Richman said.
Higgins advises anyone going to the show to visit the museum, whether they are new to studying the Holocaust or not.
“Come to the museum, take two hours and really go through and process and think about it,” Higgins said. “After that experience, there will be things that everyone learns. I have been through this museum with people who have read countless books, and there’s always some new information they glean. For those who haven’t really studied it, they will come away with a very solid, basic understanding. And hopefully they will find what really interested them or compelled them and learn on their own.”
“It just makes sense, if someone comes as a theater fan or is not fully aware of the atrocities of the Holocaust, the museum can help spark further interest and engage with the subject,” Richman said. “That’s a big win for us all.”
In addition to the Holocaust, there’s the broader message the museum focuses on, of tolerance and standing up to bigotry.
“We talk about being an Upstander rather than a bystander, not to turn a blind eye when things are happening to others, and to stand up for yourself,” Higgins said. “Simon Wiesenthal is an amazing example of those who stood up for others, seeking justice after the Holocaust. But he’s also remarkable in that he founded the Wiesenthal Center in 1977, and that center has a mission of Holocaust remembrance, but also fighting bigotry and anti-Semitism, and helping people understand the bigotry and prejudice in contemporary events. That’s our mission as well.”
The theater is at 2400 Flora St., in the downtown arts district. The event’s co-chairs are Jolene Risch, Jen Goldstein and Yana Mintskovsky. For more information on the show, to buy tickets or download the study guide, visit www.attpac.org/on-sale/2017/wiesenthal.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

SWJC talks F-35s, BDS at annual meeting

SWJC talks F-35s, BDS at annual meeting

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

Pulman speaks about perils of BDS with jet presentation in tow

By Aaron

Submitted photo Charles Pulman discusses the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement at the recent Southwest Jewish Congress annual meeting.

Submitted photo
Charles Pulman discusses the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement at the recent Southwest Jewish Congress annual meeting.

Greenberg
Special to the TJP

ADDISON — Charles Pulman took the role of bearer of bad news in stride at the Southwest Jewish Congress’ 2017 Annual Meeting on March 6 at Venue Forty50.
That’s because Pulman and his audience were already excited for the uplifting presentation to follow, by Lockheed Martin’s Eric V. Fox regarding the F-35 fighter plane.
But Pulman’s message — about Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions — was an essential half of the duo’s picture of what he called “the threat to and strength of Israel.”
“(BDS) seeks the destruction of Israel as the nation-state of the Jewish people,” the attorney and activist told attendees.
Pulman recently took four legislators from Texas and one from South Carolina to Israel to educate them on the reality of the situation and the potential impact of BDS. Israelis don’t see it as a major immediate threat, but rather as a huge long-term danger, Pulman said.
“They are worried about the effect of BDS on Millennials, when they are leaders of corporations and state government; that’s what Israel is concerned about,” Pulman said.
Pulman is one of many pro-Israel advocates actively pushing for anti-BDS legislation, such as the pending Texas House Bill 89 and Senate Bill 29.
While the BDS movement claims it is trying to right a wrong through economic pressure, Pulman warned that it does not seek peace and does not aim to help Palestinians. Instead, he said, it is bent on delegitimizing Israel through demonization. This can be seen in U.N. resolutions, such as those targeting Israeli businesses. There’s no corresponding action being taken against nations with worse human rights records.
He showed a video by influential British Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks. Sacks pointed out that there have been successive efforts to destroy Israel militarily, then economically, then politically, then psychologically. The latest version is the BDS movement, attacking it under a moral guise.
In singling out Israel and ignoring actions by other nations or the Palestinians, Sacks says, BDS is undermining its own moral argument.
“The BDS campaign will delay, defer, and endanger the Palestinian state,” Sacks said. “Rights are universal or they are nothing.”
Pulman took the legislators on a visit to a candy factory in the West Bank where 500 Palestinians worry they could lose their jobs if BDS is effective.
“They don’t want their company to turn into another SodaStream,” he said, citing a company that moved a factory from the West Bank to the Beersheba area after being targeted.
“Who got hurt? SodaStream?” he asked. “No. The Palestinians.”
Pulman stressed that while the anti-BDS legislation won’t end the problem, it is of vital importance because it will shine a light on the true aims of the BDS movement to destroy the Jewish state.
“Because the BDS campaign is a discriminatory campaign targeting Israel,” he told the TJP, “it is an anathema to the morals of the state of Texas. The state has no obligation to spend taxpayer dollars to support discrimination.”
To date, 16 states have passed anti-BDS legislation, and New York’s governor used an executive order.

One of two F-35 fighter jets in Israeli service Submitted photo

One of two F-35 fighter jets in Israeli service
Submitted photo

“When all the states pass this legislation, it’ll be a resounding message,” Pulman said. “BDS is not seeking peace. If individuals are seeking peace, what I pray for, and 95 percent of Israelis hope for, there are other ways to make your voices heard.”
The F-35 Lightning II has been in the news quite a bit recently over the cost of the program and estimates for the latest round of orders. But Fox’ lively presentation about what the fighter plane can do for the U.S. and allies like Israel won over the room.
First off, Fox noted that the costs continue to come down due to economy of scale, so that shouldn’t be a surprise. Secondly, many countries — particularly Great Britain — have paid substantial amounts into the development of the fifth-generation jets. The U.S. sells planes like the F-35 to close allies, including Israel.
The British contribution is $2 billion, part of $5 billion from American allies “that you, the American taxpayer, don’t have to pay,” Fox said.
But what really left an impression was his discussion of the plane’s capabilities. Fox compared it to the upgrade from a rotary phone to a smartphone. The stealth planes can detect enemy aircraft far quicker than they themselves can be detected, and include cutting-edge helmets designed by Israel’s Elbit Systems.
“The F-35 is a leap in technology — not just a generational leap, but a monumental leap forward in capability,” Fox told the TJP.
The wider role for the fighter planes also brings down the cost by requiring fewer other planes and allowing that manpower to be used in other ways.
Israel has 33 planes currently contracted, and a few have arrived already. It’s been named Adir — “Mighty One.” With more than 100 F-16s that will eventually need to be replaced, Fox sees the likelihood of more orders. He and Pulman saw the first planes arrive in Israel, and both talked about how impressive it was, and Israelis’ gratitude.
The night also marked a transition with Susie Salfield Avnery taking the role of president and Jonathan Spigel stepping down as chair after serving since 2009. The other officers are Harry Ploss, founding chair; Nelda Golden, vice president programming; Cindy Ray and Keo Strull, vice presidents fundraising; Rose Stromberg, vice president community relations; Marla Greenberg Janco, secretary; and Alan Tolmas, treasurer.
Dr. Catalina Garcia, Brenda Jackson, and Michelle Shriro joined the board of directors, with Bruce Bernstien and Mel Meyers as outgoing officers, and Lauren Cohen and Jenny Walters as outgoing board members.
“As the president of SWJC, I want to see the organization continue to build bridges in the community by providing quality educational programming,” Avnery said. “I appreciate that we are an organization of varied voices, liberals and conservatives, Jews and non-Jews.”
Spigel helped guide SWJC to self-sufficiency during his tenure, overseeing its development of educational programming and legislative efforts, including a successful bill signed by Gov. Rick Perry to create American Indian Heritage Day.
Pulman and Fox will give their presentations again March 23 at Congregation Ahavath Sholom in Fort Worth. SWJC has a number of other upcoming programs, including Israel and the Middle East Briefings with Gil Elan via Skype at the Aaron Family JCC in Dallas April 5 and May 3 and Ahavath Sholom April 6 and May 11, all from 7 to 8:30 p.m. The Latin American Jewish Experience will be offered April 9 at UTD’s Davidson Auditorium at 2 p.m., featuring Eli Davidsohn and Debra Polsky.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Renewed need for community safety

Renewed need for community safety

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

Submitted photo Dallas organizational leaders attend a briefing on the new community-wide security initiative.

Submitted photo
Dallas organizational leaders attend a briefing on the new community-wide security initiative.

Federation looks ahead to protect Dallas Jewish organizations

By Sean Shapiro
Special to the TJP

The Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas rolled out a new community-wide security initiative last week, with the goal of helping protect and better secure all of the Jewish organizations in the area.
“This is something that we wanted to undertake, and it’s something that we felt we could help do for everyone else,” Bradley Laye, CEO and president of the organization, said. “This is something we felt could be put in place to help keep our entire community safer.”
The announcement comes at a time when security has become more paramount for Jewish organizations. Across the country there have been more than 150 bomb threats against Jewish institutions and communities in the past eight weeks, while other acts of vandalism and anti-Semitic incidents have been on the rise.
“Unfortunately it hasn’t been the easiest time to be a Jew in the United States,” Laye said. “Through this (initiative) we want to help combat that and protect our community.”
While it may look reactionary because of the timing, the Federation has been working on this for more than a year.
“It’s unfortunate that the latest events nationally have been thrust on the forefront of our news, and have been what people outside of our community been reading most about our community,” JFGD Board Chair Dan Prescott said.
“However I will say that what I can say personally, is the that entire the Dallas Jewish Community led by the Federation will continue to be strong and will be safe and will continue to be successful.”
In February 2016 the Federation requested a $30,000 grant to research and create the community infrastructure required for a more secure Jewish community. They homed in on three main goals including:

  1. Develop a community-wide communication strategy.
  2. Develop continuous community-wide training.
  3. Perform physical site assessments to harden one’s physical infrastructure.

Representatives from local law enforcement, the FBI, and the Secure Community Network (SCN) consulted on this project and on Feb. 7, officially launched a Community Security Initiative that will be led by a director of community security.
The director of community security will be hired with a law enforcement and security background, and the hire is expected to be made within three weeks, Laye said.
That person will guide an initiative that will assess security needs; implement Mir3, a mass communication service; develop training programs; act as a liaison to local law enforcement; and work to create a commissary of security needs to increase quality and potentially reduce cost.
There is no cost to community organizations to be involved and more than 50 local Jewish organizations attended the rollout meeting last Thursday.
Laye said the meeting has had great results. Most of the questions came about specific concerns for specific organizations or institutions, which showed the community is already thinking big-picture with the application.
“It shows that this really was needed and people realize it can help them,” Laye said. “We’re happy to have something in place like this and hopefully we can help everyone feel a little bit safer.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Crowning Kosher Chili Cook-off champ

Crowning Kosher Chili Cook-off champ

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

44 teams vying to become 24th winner during March 19 event

By Sean Shapiro
Special to the TJP

The world’s best kosher chili is going to be crowned this Sunday, March 19 on the campus of Congregation Tiferet Israel.
It’s a bold claim, but now in its 24th year, the Dallas Kosher Chili Cook-off has developed a history and consistently delivers the tastiest and best kosher chili to more than 4,000 in attendance.
The cook-off started in 1994 with 10 teams and has grown into a must-attend event for the local Jewish community. There are now more than 30 sponsors for the event, including the title sponsors for this year, Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC (locally known as Prescott Pailet Benefits) and Key-Whitman Eye Center.
Dan Prescott, along with Mark Kleinman and Jack Baum, established the Kosher Chili Cook-Off in 1994.

More than 4,000 people are expected to attend this year’s Kosher Chili Cook-off, which was founded in 1994.

More than 4,000 people are expected to attend this year’s Kosher Chili Cook-off, which was founded in 1994.

Last year’s first-place winners

Last year’s first-place winners

“We were looking for a simple family event that would bring the entire Jewish community together. It is amazing how it has grown into an event that has become recognized on a national and international level,” Prescott said. “And now, along with my partners — my brother, Stuart Prescott and Kevin Pailet, and longtime friend Dr. Jeff Whitman — we are proud to serve as the title sponsors at this 24th anniversary of the cook-off.”
Forty-four teams have entered the competition this year, and more than 4,000 people are expected to attend the event Sunday. Gates will open at 10:30 a.m. and winners will be announced around 3 p.m. with prizes for the top-three beef entries and top-two veggie entries handed out by a panel of seven judges.
“It really is a difficult competition to judge,” Ed Jerome said. “Between all the teams and all the chili, it’s hard to pick out a winner. But the winner really is the best kosher chili in the world.”
There is also a people’s choice award, which is voted upon the attendants who will have a chance to taste all the different recipes.
Tickets are $12 for adults, while tickets are $6 for children aged 4 through 10. Parking and shuttles will be set up at the Dallas Jewish Community Center to help ease the traffic flow.
The sponsors help cover the majority of the costs, which helps organizers raise money for local nonprofit charities. This year the cook-off proceeds will be shared with the Assist the Officer Foundation and Jewish Community Center Camp Scholarships fund.
Assist the Officer provides financial assistance for police officers who have lost work or are out of work due to serious injury or another catastrophic event. JCC Camp Scholarships help children who otherwise wouldn’t be able to attend camp take part in the summer camps.
“Regardless of how hot anyone’s chili recipe may be, it warms my heart even more to see our community coming together in unity and friendship sharing a common goal like the Kosher Chili Cook-off and helping local charities,” Rabbi Shawn Zell of Tiferet Israel said in a press release.
Royal Lane Baptist Church will also be on-site working with Tiferet Israel on a food drive for the North Texas Food Bank at Jewish Family Services.
While the chili and charity is the main attraction, each year organizers add new elements to the event.
On Sunday, Dallas Fire and Rescue will be on-site with their Fire Safety House, a mobile house that teaches and promotes fire safety for kids. The Home Depot is setting up a station for children to work on supervised wood craft projects.
Representatives from Be The Match will be on-site. Be The Match is an organization that works to cure blood-related cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, and operates the largest bone marrow transplant registry in the world.
The Mazik Brothers band, which volunteers for the event, plays and covers hits from the 1960s through the 1980s, and singing along is always encouraged.

 

*****

 

Judges

Chef Stephen Erwin is culinary service director for the Reserve North Dallas (previously, Town Village North) and has extensive experience as chef in many Dallas area restaurants and clubs.
David Feder has been a chef in Dallas and Austin, a food writer, and teacher of Food Science and Nutrition at UT Austin. He is currently a full-time journalist, author of The Skinny Carbs Diet Book and executive editor–technical for Prepared Foods/NutraSolutions magazine.
Dotty Griffith, known as “the culinary ambassador of Texas” and an authority on Texas cuisine, is an award-winning journalist, best-selling cookbook author, television-radio personality, and adjunct professor of culinary journalism at The University of North Texas. The former Dallas Morning News critic is the face and voice of True Texas Cuisine (www.truetexascuisine.com).
Chef Danny Hall is executive chef at John Q. Hammons Hotels & Resorts and has extensive experience as chef in many Dallas area restaurants and clubs.
Chef Michael Mrugala runs the entire kitchen operation for the Olive Garden on Northwest Highway and has extensive experience as chef in many Dallas area restaurants and clubs.
Chef Pete Nolasco is the owner, chef and sculptor of Chef Pete Catering, and was awarded “best caterer in Addison” in 2013. Pete has worked for many years in the Dallas area’s best restaurants and hotels.
Michael Scott is the executive chef and sales manager at Rosewood Texas Wagu Beef in Dallas and, previously, was the executive chef at Northwood Club in Dallas. He has extensive experience as chef in many Dallas area restaurants and clubs and is currently vice president of the World Master Chefs Society.

Competing teams

Adat Chaverim Brotherhood, Akiba Academy, Anti-Defamation League, Bnai Zion, Camp Sabra, Chabad of Plano/Collin County, CHAI/Yachad, Congregation Anshai Torah, Congregation Beth Torah, Congregation Ohev Shalom, Congregation Ohr HaTorah, Congregation Shaare Tefilla, Crystal Creek at Preston Hollow, Dallas Chevra Kadisha, Dallas Holocaust Museum, Dallas Jewish Conservatives, Dallas Jewish Historical Society, Dallas Kosher/Vaad Hakashrus, DATA, Far North Dallas/Richardson Democrats, Hadassah, Hebrew Order of David International, Henry Litoff, Jewish Community Center, Jewish Family Service, Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, Kehillat Chaverim, Legacy Senior Communities – Willow Bend, Loncar & Associates, Moishe House, Sephardic Torah Center of Dallas, Shearith Israel Brotherhood, Sparkman Hillcrest, Tamarack Camps, Temple Emanu-El, Temple Shalom, Texans for Education Opportunity, Tiferet Israel, Tom Thumb, Torah Day School, Whole Foods Market, and Yavneh Academy.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (2)

No doubt that Dallas Jews support Israel

No doubt that Dallas Jews support Israel

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

GM030517-0109

AIPAC Dallas Annual Event Co-chairs Eric and Melanie Pinker, AIPAC Dallas Executive Council Chair Kenny Goldberg, Keynote Speaker Professor Alan Dershowitz and Co-chairs Susie and Joel Carp

AIPAC Dallas Annual Event Co-chairs Eric and Melanie Pinker, AIPAC Dallas Executive Council Chair Kenny Goldberg, Keynote Speaker Professor Alan Dershowitz and Co-chairs Susie and Joel Carp

AIPAC National President Lillian Pinkus moderates. (From left) Rep. Pete Sessions, Rep. Louie Gomer, Rep. Bill Flores, Rep. Marc Veasey and Rep. John Ratcliffe

AIPAC National President Lillian Pinkus moderates. (From left) Rep. Pete Sessions, Rep. Louie Gomer, Rep. Bill Flores, Rep. Marc Veasey and Rep. John Ratcliffe

Susie Carp interviews Alan Dershowitz.

Susie Carp interviews Alan Dershowitz.

More than 1,500 attend AIPAC Dallas event

Staff report

More than 1,500 ardent supporters of Israel gathered at the Omni Hotel on March 5 for AIPAC’s Dallas Annual Event (DAE). AIPAC Dallas Executive Council Chair Kenny Goldberg kicked off the evening, followed by welcoming remarks from Eric Pinker, event co-chair.
AIPAC National President Lillian Pinkus moderated the bipartisan congressional round table featuring Rep. Pete Sessions (R), U.S. Representative Louie Gomer (R), U.S. Rep. Bill Flores (R), U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey (D) and Rep. John Ratcliffe (R). Temple Emanu-El Rabbi David Stern followed, discussing his participation in an American Israel Education Foundation (AIEF) rabbinical mission.
One of the most memorable parts of the evening was a talk by TCU student activist Yannick Tona, a survivor of the genocide in Rwanda. He made poignant remarks about how members of his nuclear family had perished and his escape. He shared that his story is Israel’s story, making him a passionate advocate for the Jewish state.
Following that, Elias Saratovsky, AIPAC Southwest regional director, shared AIPAC’s mission through personal vignettes. The denouement of the evening was DAE Co-chair Susie Carp’s discussion with Harvard Professor Alan Dershowitz. A passionate Israel advocate, Dershowitz explained in depth the case for Israel from all political vantage points and the insidiousness of BDS.
In addition to Eric Pinker and Susie Carp, co-chairs for the well-received evening were their spouses Melanie Pinker and Joel Carp.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Bachman Lake’s survival hinges on dredge

Bachman Lake’s survival hinges on dredge

Posted on 16 March 2017 by admin

High school student on path to get funding, works to clear silt, debris from water

By Aaron Greenberg
Special to the TJP

DALLAS — Henry Roseman sits at the controls of a small boat on Bachman Lake. He slows the boat down, and turns off the motor. He gets up and grabs an oar, guiding the boat for a moment. Then he stands straight up, lifts the oar so that it is completely vertical, and lowers it into the water.

Submitted photo Henry Roseman has worked to raise awareness about the condition of Bachman Lake.

Submitted photo
Henry Roseman has worked to raise awareness about the condition of Bachman Lake.

At least, he tries to. It only goes down about half a foot, meeting muck and debris.
“Welcome to Bachman Island, population 0,” Roseman said.
The high school student is in the middle of the body of water, yet a number of sizable tree branches are sticking out of the water within a few feet of him. From this vantage point, it quickly becomes clear that a vast swath of Bachman Lake hardly covers sediment and whatever else has settled there.
It’s a familiar routine for Roseman, who regularly brings media members out to “the island,” and constantly contacts government officials in an effort to fix the problem. He notes many boats have been damaged, and the island could pose a life-threatening risk to those unfamiliar with it.
Supporting the effort
It’s hardly a one-man show — Roseman has the full support of the Dallas Rowing Club — but the senior at Dallas ISD’s School for the Talented and Gifted has clearly taken the reins of the effort. The island developed as a result of a storm in May 2015, and has continued growing since. Orange buoys put up by the club mark the boundaries, about the length of a football field and 20-30 feet wide.
Club President Richard Misdom says many members have called for action, especially since their regatta had to be canceled, but Henry took the next step.
“He wasn’t satisfied just telling us,” Misdom said. “He doesn’t want to just sit on the sidelines; he wants to be involved.”
Roseman said that as a student he has more time than members with careers, but they have helped set up meetings a high schooler can’t.
That’s not all of it, though. Roseman paraphrases Hillel’s saying in the first chapter of Pirkei Avot.
“It’s a pretty strong tikkun olam thing,” Roseman says. “I can fix it. If not me, who? And why not? If not now, when? It’s only getting worse.”
He and his brother Robert are fourth-generation members of Temple Emanu-El, and his family has always been very involved in Jewish circles. His grandparents are Rabbi Kenneth (who served at Temple Shalom) and Phyllis Roseman and Lynn and Sharan Goldstein. Parents Amy and Michael are also extremely proud of what Henry is doing.
“I love our family dinners, and looking across the table, and looking next to me to think what our boys are doing to give back to the community,” said Amy Roseman. “Honestly, it is the ultimate compliment to see my kids get involved in the Jewish community and Dallas community. It just warms my heart.”
Henry has become a song leader at Emanu-El and was on the search committee that brought in Cantor Vicky Glikin. And while he calls the Bachman Lake effort his first real activism, it stems in part from lessons learned when, as a sophomore, he took part in L’Taken, a social justice seminar and lobbying weekend in Washington.
Roseman and his fellow students met with staffers for Senators Ted Cruz and John Cornyn, and met Rep. Pete Sessions. He learned the power of reaching out to officials and their staff. That’s become helpful, as there are multiple jurisdictions at the city and agency level for Bachman Lake.
“They probably think this high school kid is working on a project, ‘I’ll give him 15 minutes and help someone with their school project,’ not realizing they’re dealing with someone who has devoted a lot of time and done extensive research,” Amy Roseman said.
Henry has spent hours digging through materials at the library, plus the 6,000 photos and 22 gigs of data he received as part of an open records request about the 2015 storm.
“When something piques his interest, he wants to learn as much as possible,” Amy Roseman said. “He’s been that way since he was tiny. So it’s not totally out of character for him to take this to the media and get passionate about it.”
The lake is in State Rep. Rafael Anchia’s district, but Roseman says he’s been able to get help from his own rep, Jason Villalba. Three city councilors represent portions of the lake — Mayor Pro Tem Monica Alonzo, Jennifer Staubach Gates and Adam Medrano.
“Luckily, Mayor Pro Tem Alonzo is taking it on as though it is hers,” Roseman said.
Through a quirk of fate, 10 feet of Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson’s congressional district was swapped with 10 feet in the middle of the lake — part of the island. Roseman said her office was more responsive after this was pointed out.
Johnson is on the aviation subcommittee, and since the lake is so close to Love Field, any effect on air travel could cause the FAA to help pay to clean it up. Roseman’s research into bird strikes shows that they went up drastically in the year after the storm, from 80 to 122. He believes the island plays into that, as birds can be seen standing in the water with easy pickings.
“The birds being there isn’t a problem except for the metal birds. It turns out birds and airplanes don’t play so well together,” Roseman said.
Red tape surfaces
But the lake is under the direct authority of the Trinity Watershed Management, which hasn’t been as helpful as Roseman would like. Several other agencies also have a say, from parks to utilities to the EPA.
The Bachman Lake Annual Sprint Trials were the only regatta in Dallas, drawing 18 clubs and 271 entries in 2015. Roseman estimated that $9,350 in tax revenue is lost per year. Hundreds of people use the lake to row, kayak or canoe each weekend.
The last dredging cost $5.5 million. Roseman estimates it would be about $13 million now, with the cost increasing each year. The last study was done shortly before the 2015 storm, so Roseman said it was outdated as soon as it was released, and despite promises of a new study, he hasn’t seen action.
And so Roseman is bringing attention to the island and debris, especially near the overpasses. For rowers like him, it’s a lurking danger. For those who are less familiar with the lake, it’s a potential death trap.
“I’ve seen everything from adult-sized waterwings to air mattresses. If it floats, they are out there,” he says. “It could end really badly for a significant number of people. We don’t want for someone to die.”
Roseman said the consistency of the island is similar to compost, and anyone who tries to stand on it will sink like in quicksand.
“You could easily sink so your mouth and nose are underwater. Can you swim through compost?”
There is also the ever-changing nature of the island. Each time he’s gone out, Roseman has encountered new contours and problems.
“Tomorrow morning or afternoon, it’ll be a totally different underwater topography,” Roseman said.
His biggest success so far came after considerable back and forth with City Hall. A boom with a hole about 2 feet wide — thanks to a Christmas tree — was repaired. On the same trip, debris was cleared away near one of the overpasses. But as time goes by, the debris will continue to gather, building up the island.
This has happened before. It was so bad at one time that a picnic table was placed in the middle of the lake. After the dredging in 2002, there was a minimum depth of 8 feet. Now it’s 6 inches.
Roseman has been rowing for five years, starting in the eighth grade. He’s been with the rowing club since spring 2013, and Bachman is the only home base he’s ever had.
“It was pristine, it was beautiful,” he said.
Now, not so much. About a month ago, Misdom saw a fire department rescue in progress. A vehicle had gone into the water, and the rescuers didn’t realize how little room they had to maneuver their boat.
“He probably needs 3 feet, 2 feet of water,” Misdom said. “That’s just not there. He had to push and pull to get loose. Fortunately, there was nobody in that car. It’s going to be increasingly more difficult for them to get those size boats through the lake.”
Henry Roseman sees three possible scenarios. One, it gets fixed now. Two, officials procrastinate and pay more. Three, they let it be, taking Bachman Lake off the map.
“Let the lake fill up, and take a Sharpie marker and make it Bachman Park,” Roseman said.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

View or Subscribe to the
Texas Jewish Post

Advertise Here

Photos from our Flickr stream

See all photos

Advertise Here