Archive | News

BBYO Kiev trip opens local teen’s eyes

BBYO Kiev trip opens local teen’s eyes

Posted on 05 December 2018 by admin

Photos: Courtesy Hannah Fritts
Hannah Fritts and 19 other teens represented the United States as BBYO ambassadors in Kiev last month.

By Hannah Fritts

On Nov. 4, 2018, I joined 19 other Jewish teens from across the United States for an eight-day journey to Kiev, Ukraine. The 20 of us were going as international ambassadors with BBYO, a Jewish teen-led youth organization, to explore the city, learn and bond together, tour historical sites, do service projects, and be part of the international delegation to BBYO’s partner organization in the former Soviet Union, Active Jewish Teens, fifth International Conference.
Our time in the city and engaging with the local Jewish community was absolutely incredible, but the conference is definitely what stuck with me the most from the trip.
At the conference, I was placed in a programming group filled with incredible people. There, I was able to make powerful connections with everyone in my group, despite not speaking the same language as all of them. With all the programming being in Russian, my translators were an integral part of my experience. The girls who would translate for me became my friends quickly. Our off-topic conversations turned into strong friendships, and we would spend our breaks chatting, bonding over our cultural differences, dancing the night away during the final party and crying into each other’s arms the next morning when we had to say goodbye.
I was crying not just because we had to go our separate ways, but because the stories of the teens at the convention, like these girls, were moving and inspiring.
Jewish life has always been an under-appreciated freedom of mine. I grew up at Temple Shalom and became a bat mitzvah, but in recent months I began to ponder my Jewish identity more than ever before. On the bus ride after leaving the convention, I began to analyze all the little things that led me to Kiev — the things that led me to meet these people, hear their stories, and be given the privilege to have them be a part of my lifelong Jewish journey.
All my Jewish ancestors came to America from Eastern Europe. They dreamed of an American Jewry so strong that it was able to be a light for other Jews around the world. This is the beautiful Jewry that BBYO enables, not just for teens in America, but for teens in places worldwide where Judaism is finally being rekindled.
That is what brought me to tears — the thought of these teens activating their Judaism and being the first generation in a long time to live a Jewish life, celebrating it, and sharing it with me.
I went on this trip wishing to have a stellar travel and learning experience, but I walked away with much more than just that. I left with many little blessings to carry with me in my mind for many years to come. Blessings of newfound friends, religious perspective and memories that will last longer than my lifetime, because I get to share them with all of you. Memories of laughter despite not sharing a language, smiles despite not sharing any acquaintance and lasting friendships despite not sharing geography.
This trip has excited and inspired me to take on new adventures, make the most out of the rest of my time in BBYO and not take my Judaism for granted. BBYO has given me the outlet to explore, refine and elevate my own Jewish identity, and through this trip, I have been given the privilege to honor our history, serve the community and be a small part of someone else’s Jewish life.
Hannah Fritts is a junior at The Winston School of Dallas and is engaged within the Jewish community. She holds leadership roles both within BBYO and her school’s student government. She also loves singing and spending time with friends.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

‘Never leave anything unfinished’ is her motto

‘Never leave anything unfinished’ is her motto

Posted on 05 December 2018 by admin

Photo: Deb Silverthorn
Janet Fein will receive her bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of Texas at Dallas Dec. 19.

By Deb Silverthorn

Reading, ’riting, and ’rithmetic were always important to Janet Fein, but never more so than in the last six years, as she’s studied toward earning her bachelor’s degree. Never has there been more of an example of “better late than never” than this octogenarian, who will walk during University of Texas at Dallas’ commencement Wednesday, Dec. 19.
The 84-year-old sociology major and mother of David (Dena), Robert, Mitchell (Gail), Scott (Meryl) and Susan, of blessed memory, and the grandmother of Jonathan and Michael (Katia) Bittle, Adam (Kylee), Brooke, Joshua, Rachel and Zachary Fein, and Whitney (Blake) Silverthorn, is the second-to-last family member to graduate college.
“In my family, I’ve got a doctor, a speech therapist, a couple of artists, sales and marketing professionals, a nurse, a teacher and an engineer,” Fein said. “I’m excited to join them in getting my degree. I’ve worked hard and as proud as I am of them, I’m proud of me too.”
Born Janet Schwartz Oct. 16, 1934, Fein found herself uninterested at school, perhaps ahead of her classmates. She eventually skipped the eighth and 11th grades, and graduated from New York’s William Taft High School at age 16.
Fein went to work after high school as a secretary at a dress manufacturer. That’s where she met Howard, of blessed memory, the man who would be her husband of 35 years.
Once their children were born, Fein stayed home as the family followed Howard’s U.S. Army service to Fort Myers, Virginia; Miami; and Columbia, South Carolina. The family also lived in Maryland and Kentucky before Dallas became home in 1970. She reflects on a city where Belt Line Road was two lanes and “about as far north as most people traveled.” The Feins belonged to Congregation Tiferet Israel, then were among the founders of Temple Shalom.
Fein spent 12 years working at the Dallas Hilton Inn as a secretary, payroll clerk and, eventually, personnel director. Two years after work required a move to Buffalo, New York, Fein returned to Dallas, alone, wanting to be closer to her children and their growing families.
“We’d built a beautiful family, but it was time,” she said. “I came back to the kids, and I’ve never been sorry.”
Returning home, Fein earned her associate degree from Richland College in 1995, a journey begun years before.
“Mom’s been through a lot, and she’s always stuck by to finishing what is important to her,” said son Scott, recalling Fein riding DART with her walker and oxygen when her health required. “She still pursued it all and with lots of enthusiasm, and her family couldn’t be prouder of her.”
After returning to Dallas, Fein worked for the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas and then Texas Scottish Rite Hospital where she built a 20-year career — the first and most soothing face one met in the movement lab.
“I loved it because it wasn’t ‘work,’” Fein said. “They appreciated me and treated me very well. I saw many of our patients grow from youngsters to adulthood.”
Retiring in 2012, at 78, Fein believed it time to finish her degree. “Because I was over 65, I got free tuition. I picked sociology because the study of people and society was a perfect match,” Fein said.
“I learned about cultures, people and religions, and I learned to respect many I didn’t know about,” said Fein. “Even at 78, I realized I had a lot to learn.”
“Janet soaked up our class materials and lessons and shared her knowledge and wisdom with her fellow students, helping them see the importance of the knowledge of history and the lessons learned through the study of religion and society today,” said UTD Professor Bobby Alexander, who taught one of Fein’s favorite classes, Religion in Society, along with the Immigrants and Immigration in U.S. Society course she took.
“She showed them how to stick to the task of study,” Alexander said. “The best part of teaching Janet was her referring to historical events related to our discussions, bringing wisdom of her years and experience.”
UTD Sociology Program Head Richard Scotch supervised Fein during her last two semesters through independent studies. Emailing lessons and assignments, the two created a bond without ever meeting.
“We had many interesting interchanges, and I’m glad we could accommodate her,” said Scotch, for whom online programs are rare. Making an exception, he said she wrote thoughtful papers and asked great questions. “It was more than a pleasure to work with her. I admire the energy she brought and her absolutely incredible pursuit of education.”
Scotch recalled that during a recent State of the University speech, UTD President Richard C. Benson spoke of the breadth of this graduating class, spanning the ages from teenage to Fein.
Her family being the most important part of her life, it wasn’t lost on her that a recent midterm exam was on lifecycles. Clearly, she was alone in turning in a project with photos expressing family births, deaths, weddings and more.
“Lots of people say they’d like to go back to school — and they should,” said Fein, who lives on her own, proud of her independence. When she’s not studying or hugging her children, Fein has enjoyed making dolls and jewelry.
“I’ve enjoyed the reading and I’ve learned a lot. This has been very rewarding and it feels great to have completed a goal I’ve had for so long. Never leave anything unfinished.”
TJP contributor Deb Silverthorn’s son Blake is married to Janet Fein’s granddaughter Whitney.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

JCRC helps persuade state school board decision

JCRC helps persuade state school board decision

Posted on 05 December 2018 by admin

Photo: JCRC
Texas social studies teachers learn about the Arab-Israeli conflict at the Texas Council of Social Studies Conference in October.

Guidelines adopted by the Texas State Board of Education in November to teach about the Arab-Israeli conflict and the geopolitical history of the Middle East were a huge win for the Jewish Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas and the Jewish community as a whole.
Since June of this year, Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC) staff has been working with the San Francisco-based Institute of Curriculum Services (ICS) to monitor the state school board as it updated the social studies portion of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) standards. TEKS determines the content of textbooks produced for Texas school districts, which are purchased and utilized by 34 other states. Therefore, this has an enormous impact on what students across the country learn about Israel and the Middle East.
The JCRC and ICS have worked collaboratively since 2009. The Public Education Initiative was launched as a grant-funded joint program of the JCRC and ICS with the goal of impacting the Texas textbook adoption process, known as Proclamation 2015. The initiative successfully worked with members of the education board and the educational community to ensure accuracy about Jews, Judaism and Israel in Texas educational standards, textbooks and classroom materials.
During the state review process, more than 1,400 edits to the new Texas social studies textbooks were adopted by the State Board of Education, representing 88 percent of total recommended edits. This means that 2.1 million students in Texas received more accurate information about these topics.
ICS, in partnership with the JCRC, exhibited and presented at the 2018 Texas Council for the Social Studies Conference in mid-October in Houston. Hundreds of social studies educators statewide attended the conference. ICS presented in three separate sessions at the conference, engaging over 50 educators on topics like Teaching the Arab-Israeli Conflict with Primary Sources, Environmental Challenges and Cooperation in the Middle East, and Teaching Religion in the Classroom.
Feedback from educators who attended ICS breakout sessions at the conference was extremely positive, JCRC officials said. Following the Teaching Religion in the Classroom session, one teacher shared that she loved the open discussions that were held about the case studies that were provided. The teachers who attended the Environmental Cooperation session appreciated the collaborative activities that they can use with their students. In addition, one of the attendees shared that the Teaching the Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process session was one of the best presentations at the entire conference.
Prompted by the positive feedback received at the conference, several social studies coordinators inquired about offering professional development within their districts, and the JCRC is working with ICS to try to bring a two-day summer institute to the Dallas-Fort Worth area in 2019. The institute is an in-depth opportunity for teachers to learn about teaching the Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process. Participants are selected by application, and receive a $300 honorarium for attending.
As the public affairs division of the Federation, the JCRC’s mission is to build understanding and generate support for Israel and public policy and social issues that are important to the Dallas metro area Jewish community. To learn more about the work of the Dallas JCRC, visit www.jewishdallas.org/JCRC.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Remembering President George H.W. Bush

Remembering President George H.W. Bush

Posted on 05 December 2018 by admin

Photos: Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images
President George Bush poses for photographers following his Oval Office address to the nation, Sept. 27, 1991.

By Ron Kampeas

WASHINGTON (JTA) — George H.W. Bush, who died last Friday, was a one-term president whose public grappling with Jewish leaders made headlines while his private interventions helped bring tens of thousands of Jews out of danger.
Bush, 94, died at his home in Houston, his family said, less than a year after the passing of his beloved wife of 73 years, Barbara.
His failed 1992 re-election bid marked a low point in relations between Republicans and the Jewish community. Bush scored just 11 percent of the Jewish vote in that contest, one-third of what he garnered four years earlier in his 1988 victory over Michael Dukakis.
The Bush presidency was marked by tensions both with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir and the American Jewish leadership.
In 1991, Bush lashed out at pro-Israel activists who had flooded Congress in response to the president’s reluctance to approve loan guarantees requested by Israel to help absorb hundreds of thousands of Jews from the just-collapsed Soviet Union.
Bush called himself “one lonely guy” battling “1,000 lobbyists on the Hill.” Jewish leaders resented the insinuation that the pro-Israel community was possessed of a power sinister enough to unsettle the leader of the free world as borderline anti-Semitic.
The “one lonely guy” comment haunted Bush thereafter, with even Republican Jews apt to use the first Bush presidency as a signifier of how far they had traveled in attracting Jewish support.
Yet, that was hardly the whole story. Less remembered was how, as Ronald Reagan’s vice president, Bush quietly helped engineer some of the pivotal moments in the effort to bring Jews out of the former Soviet Union, Ethiopia and Syria.
“When you add up the Jews he saved, he will be a great tzaddik,” Abraham Foxman, the Anti-Defamation League’s former national director, said in 2013, using the Hebrew word for “righteous man.”
Bush was deeply involved in foreign policy as vice president, and Jewish leaders said he helped orchestrate the dramatic Seder hosted by Secretary of State George Schultz at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow in 1987.
He also ignored advice from much of his national security team in 1991 — the very period when he was in the throes of his most difficult arguments with Jewish leaders — and approved American overtures to the Mengistu regime in Ethiopia that resulted in Operation Solomon, which brought 15,000 Jews to Israel. Among other things, Bush secured a “golden parachute” for Mengistu Haile Mariam, the dictator who was already plotting his escape to luxurious exile in Zimbabwe.
Bush also was instrumental in persuading Hafez Assad, the Syrian dictator, to allow young Jewish women to leave Syria for New York so they could be matched with men in the Syrian Jewish community.
Some of these actions were secret at the time, and Bush was averse to claiming responsibility even in subsequent years.
“He was a man who was old school,” said Marshall Breger, who was the liaison to the Jewish community under Reagan and Bush. “With him, you had the sense of him being private about his feelings and sensitive to the notion that he might be seen as vain and saccharine towards other with overstatements.”
Breger recalled traveling in the backseat of a car with Bush to dedicate the new quarters of the National Museum of American Jewish Military History in 1984. Part of the dedication included the affixing of a mezuzah, and Breger attempted to hand Bush a yarmulke. Bush wouldn’t take it.
Breger pointed out that he had secured a camouflage yarmulke for the occasion, but that seemed to make matters worse.
“I said, ‘You’ll need to wear one of these.’ And he said, ‘They’ll think I’m pandering.’ It was very much against his code to pander,” said Breger, now a law professor at Catholic University.
“I said, ‘First of all, they’ll think you’re appropriate, and second of all, they’d love you to pander,’” Breger recalled.
Bush reluctantly donned the yarmulke, but Breger noticed he had removed it before the ceremony concluded.
Bush’s intense privacy came across as stiffness and allowed his rivals to portray him as patrician and distant. Two moments in the 1992 election helped alienate the public from the president, whose masterful handling of the first Persian Gulf War helped bury post-Vietnam War ambivalence about the military.
His apparent surprise at supermarket scanner technology suggested that he was unfamiliar with the mundane chores of average Americans. Though the story was debunked — Bush was familiar with the device, but was amazed at a new generation scanner on display at a grocery convention in Florida — the image stuck.
At a town hall meeting in Exeter, New Hampshire, during the primaries, looking at notes, Bush read out aloud, “Message: I care,” not realizing it was advice from one of his aides. The phrase became an emblem of his awkward inability to connect.
Public service was a natural draw for George Herbert Walker Bush, whose father, Prescott Bush, was a U.S. senator from Connecticut. In later years he would recall how natural it seemed to enlist in the Navy after graduating from the elite Andover Academy in 1942. He became a bomber pilot and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross after the Japanese shot down his plane in 1944.
A year later he married Barbara Pierce and, like his forebears, attended Yale University. Seeking to make his own way in life, he declined his father’s offer of a job at an investment banking firm and headed to Texas, where he plunged into the oil business. First, he sold supplies, and within years he was an oilman.
But Bush couldn’t resist the call of public service, and by the end of the 1950s he was active in the state Republican Party. In 1966, he was elected to Congress — a signal achievement at that time for a Republican from Texas.
In Washington, he soon forged friendly ties with national Jewish groups. Appointed ambassador to the United Nations by Richard Nixon in 1972, he made headlines when he canceled an appearance on “The Dick Cavett Show” after Jewish leaders asked him not to lend legitimacy to another Cavett guest the same evening. The guest was Meir Kahane of the Jewish Defense League, whose radical and at times violent advocacy had alienated the Jewish establishment.
Bush wrote Cavett at the time that he had checked with “certain responsible, highly respected leaders of national Jewish organizations” who convinced him that “any move by me that would have even the slightest appearance of giving recognition or credence to Kahane would damage the serious productive and legal efforts that they and thousands of their fellow Jews have been making to alleviate the suffering of their brothers.”
At the United Nations, Bush made Soviet Jewry one of his signature issues, and the Jewish community organized a tribute dinner for him in 1973 after he left his post.
His concern for Israel and its relationship with the United States was evident again in 1976, when he was director of the CIA. Bush was furious that CIA officials had estimated in a semi-public forum that Israel had 10-20 nuclear weapons ready for use. Since the 1960s, the joint U.S.-Israel protocol had been neither to confirm nor deny Israel’s alleged possession of nuclear weapons.
In a statement that year to JTA, Bush would not address the apparent revelation, but added: “To the degree that any classified information might have been mentioned, I accept full responsibility. I am determined it will not happen again.”
Bush ran a contentious primary against Reagan in 1980, then accepted his offer as running mate. He assumed critical foreign policy roles under Reagan, but the two men never grew close. Reagan barely stumped for Bush in 1988.
Still, the departing president did his successor a favor in early 1989, giving the go-ahead for low-level U.S.-Palestine Liberation Organization relations. Bush would have faced a political firestorm had he initiated such ties, but he needed them to pave the way to one of his grand ambitions: corralling the Middle East cats into a new world order of peace, led by what was fast becoming the world’s only superpower.
Bush’s patrician lèse-majesté irked Israeli officials, especially Prime Minister Shamir, whose rough youth as the child of parents murdered by their Polish neighbors, and then as a prestate terrorist, could not have contrasted more with Bush’s upbringing.
In “A World Transformed,” the recounting of his presidency that Bush wrote with his national security adviser, Brent Scowcroft, Bush commended Shamir for making the unpopular decision not to strike Iraq during the 1991 Gulf War despite the raining of missiles on Israeli cities.
Just pages later, Bush wondered why Shamir was unenthusiastic about joining the Madrid peace conference that the United States had convened after the war. Bush wrote that he expected a degree of gratitude from Israel for protecting it during the Gulf War — apparently not realizing that it was precisely this unwanted protection that stirred resentment among Israelis fiercely committed to protecting themselves.
The diplomatic clashes did not abate. In June 1990, Bush’s most trusted adviser, James Baker, appearing before the U.S. House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee, asked for a little “good faith” from Shamir.
“When you’re serious about peace, call us,” Baker said, addressing a virtual Shamir, and gave the number for the White House switchboard.
In March 1992, Ed Koch, the former New York City mayor, wrote that Baker had dismissed concern about Jewish anger, saying “F*** the Jews, they don’t vote for us.” Baker adamantly denied it.
Fred Zeidman, a Houston-area businessman and Republican fundraiser who is friendly with the Bush family and with Baker, said the remark has long been misunderstood. Baker was aiming his ire at another Cabinet member, Zeidman said, and intended it as a joke.
By mid-1992, with his presidential campaign underway, Bush seemed irreparably wounded in the eyes of the Jewish community. The strong primary performance by Pat Buchanan, a culture warrior known for meandering occasionally into Jew-baiting, didn’t help. Nor did Buchanan’s apocalyptic keynote speech at the convention that summer.
Jewish leaders have said that in encounters with Bush since his presidency, they endeavored to make clear to him how dear to the community he is. Malcolm Hoenlein, the executive vice president of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, recalled meeting with Bush not long after his “one lonely guy” remark.
Bush had tears in his eyes, Hoenlein said, and insisted he never intended offense.
“I led my whole life differently,” Bush told the delegation.
Bush rarely interacted with Jewish leaders after his presidency, and he never knew the adulation his son would earn in some Jewish quarters for his devotion to Israel.
His son, former President George W. Bush, seemed in some ways to directly contradict his father’s policies. One of the elder Bush’s first acts was to set in motion the process that would eventually welcome PLO leader Yasser Arafat into the American sphere. The younger Bush decided from the outset of his presidency to isolate Arafat, whom he reviled as an unrepentant terrorist.
Foxman said Jewish history would judge Bush kindly.
“I believe he will go down in Jewish history as the president who was engaged in more initiatives to save more Jews in countries where they were being persecuted,” he said.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Brunch will fete Shalom Softball League’s 44 years

Brunch will fete Shalom Softball League’s 44 years

Posted on 29 November 2018 by admin

Photo: John Hauf
The Temple Shalom Softball League spring champions, the Astros, comprise: (front row from left) Danny Marti, Scott Elfenbein, Freddy Barreaz, David Ruiz and Jason Chapman; (top row) Jorge Quintero, Mark Elfenbein, Robert Santiago, George Reed, Brian Smallwood, Scott Sulzer and captain John Hauf. (Craig Einhorn is not pictured.)

By Deb Silverthorn

The Temple Shalom Brotherhood Softball League has rounded the bases for another season, and its team members, friends, families, fans and the community will celebrate its 44th season from 9:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9, at Temple Shalom.
The Shalom League Softball awards banquet, featuring guest speaker Dale Hansen, the WFAA sports anchor, will celebrate the league’s spring and fall Season division winners, championship teams, most valuable players, rookies of the year, fan of the year, and recipient of the Mr. Shalom Brotherhood award.
“The Shalom League has been a huge part of my life, for more than half my life and that’s a long time,” said Bob Weinfeld, 92, one of the league’s founders who has captained his beloved Pittsburgh Pirates for all 44 years. The league, with 387 players participating for five years or more, grew out of a crew of teams gathering for pickup games over the six years previous. “I’ve kept years’ worth of logs, a real history, and now another year, literally, is in the books.” The Shalom League, open to all adult males, began in 1975 with six teams on two fields at Churchill Park. Heritage Yards in North Plano has been the league’s home field for the past 20 years. This year, 240 players on 20 teams made up the spring 2018 roster, and 168 players on 14 teams played this fall.
Honors will be given to the 2018 spring division winners, the Emeralds led by Sean Greeley, and spring champions, the Astros, captained by John Hauf; and the fall division winners, the Thunder, captained by John Miller, and the Rockhounds, led by Tyler Samsel, and fall champions, the Lake Monsters, captained by Scott Lawrence.
The 2018 rookie of the year and spring finals MVP Jorge Quintero, spring batting champion Max Henry and spring Gold Glove winners Brian Ortega and Darius Wu will be recognized. Wu will also receive honors as fall batting champion and home run champion for both the spring and fall seasons.
The recipient of the 16th Annual Phyllis Unell Scholarship — with this year’s scholarship money reaching $8,000 — 2018 inductees to the league’s Hall of Fame, captain’s MVP and Commissioner’s Awards also will be announced.
“For more than 20 years the league has been a huge part of my life and the friendships made, and the experiences shared, make everyone family,” said Wayne Casper, eight years the league’s commissioner, volunteering almost fulltime hours to coordinate 40 games each Sunday in the spring and 28 during the fall. “There are a lot of talented players, and lots with ‘less’ talent. But out on the fields, it’s nothing but camaraderie and goodness.”

Photo: Scott Lawrence
The Temple Shalom Softball League fall champions, the Lake Monsters, comprise: (front row from left) Kendal Anthony, Roosevelt Gonzalez, Tommy Baer, Adwild Perez and Jeff Radanof; (top row) Captain Scott Lawrence, Matt Brumley, Zack Kazda, John Burke, Tony Lowery, Kevin Knox and Craig Einhorn. (Brian Ortega is not pictured.)

Hansen, the 10 p.m. weeknight sports anchor and host of the Sunday night Dale Hansen’s Sports Special on Channel 8, has been with WFAA for 35 years. Beginning his career as a radio disc jockey and operations manager, then sports reporter at KMTV in Omaha, Nebraska, it was there, as part of a softball league, that Hansen met his future wife.
“Sports is a metaphor for life and all I believe and try to be is based on the lessons of the field,” said Hansen, who has enjoyed playing football, baseball, basketball, volleyball and bowling, golf his mainstay, since he was 12. “I’m honored to be asked to be a part of this event and I appreciate the invitation. I promise it’ll be fun, it’ll be exciting — it might even be a bit controversial, but it’ll be a great way to spend part of a Sunday.”
At the awards brunch, filmmaker Randy Kamen, a former Shalom League catcher and right-fielder, will share parts of his “Temple Shalom Softball” documentary, now covering the Fretz Park years of 1982-1992 and featuring Jay Lifshen, who died earlier this year.
“Jay, who was one of the winningest captains, a fierce competitor, and a friend to all who knew him, is such a central figure to the Fretz Park years of the league,” said Kamen. The filmmaker has completed production on the documentary’s “The First Inning,” spanning 1975-1977, and “The Second Inning,” covering 1978-1981, and continues to raise funds to complete the project. “A Temple Shalom Hall-of-Famer and die-hard Yankees fan, Jay is one of the legendary figures forever remembered for his play on the field and his brotherhood off the field.”
The spring draft begins each February (applications for spring 2019 now posted at shalomleague.org) and games run from March through August. A quick turnaround finds the fall draft in August with games played through November.
“The friends from all walks of life, the fellowship, and the brotherhood are something I don’t think can be found anywhere else,” said Weinfeld. Casper echoed the sentiments. “There’s a lot of ‘special’ out there, but the Shalom League — it’s its own kind of special. We hope the community will come see what we’re all about, maybe sign on, but for sure have a great day.”
Breakfast is free for spring and fall season players and all Shalom Brotherhood members in good standing, and $5 for all others. For more information or to RSVP, call Weinfeld at 972-814-6214 or email robert.weinfeld@tx.rr.com. To donate to the Temple Shalom Softball documentary series, email shalom.softball.documentary@gmail.com.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Anshai Torah honors Rajunovs at Diamonds & Dice

Anshai Torah honors Rajunovs at Diamonds & Dice

Posted on 29 November 2018 by admin

Photo: Courtesy Rajunov Family
Debbie and Manuel Rajunov, center, with their children Josh and Abby, will be honored at Congregation Anshai Torah’s Diamonds and Dice event on Dec. 8.

Congregation Anshai Torah will play to a full house at its 2018 Diamonds & Dice casino night, honoring Debbie and Manuel Rajunov. The community is invited to an evening of games and fun, music and merriment, of heavy hors d’oeuvres and an open bar from 8 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8.
“Debbie and Manuel are two of the most enthusiastic supporters of our shul,” Rabbi Stefan Weinberg said. “They’re always ready to say yes — demonstrating their dedication to Anshai Torah on a daily basis. We are honored to express our gratitude to them for their leadership.”
Co-chairs Jennifer Hersh, Kimberly Mabel and Eric Olschwanger are joined by Jackie Austein, Beth Berk, Cynthia Brooks, Debbie Cohn, Gretchen Edwards, Shawn Frank, Amy Gross, Marcy Kahn, Matt Kurtzman, Shana Staub, Harvey Swento, Brad Welcher and Kim Velevis in creating the spirited night of Vegas chic. A silent auction will feature jewelry, sporting and entertainment event tickets, pampering opportunities, gifts and more.
“This is a night to celebrate, honor and raise funds to support all that makes Anshai Torah the place people call home,” Rabbi Michael Kushnick said. “The Rajunovs, among the pillars of our congregation, are there at every turn ensuring our success. They are dedicated, present, and they care about every facet of Anshai Torah.”
The Rajunovs, Anshai Torah members for 15 years, help coordinate and lead programs and events, and offer support regularly and devotedly.
Debbie is the daughter of Sabra parents Gideon and Ilana Kishony, and the sister of David, Karen and Ron. A New York native who was raised in Schaumburg, Illinois, Debbie attended religious school and was a member of the youth group at her family’s Beth Tikvah Congregation.
A graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture, Debbie is a member of Anshai Torah’s board of directors and co-chair of its Religious School Committee.
Manuel, the son of Ana and Fermin and brother of David and Vicky, was born in Mexico City and spent his formative years living on the Tijuana/San Diego border area. His commitment to Jewish life and Israel began early as he attended religious school four days a week and was a member and leader of the local chapter of Maccabi, a Zionist organization. He has been to Israel 16 times in the past six years for business, personal reasons and on educational missions.
Manuel is an attorney with Greenberg Traurig, LLP, the only international law firm to have an established office in Israel. His practice focuses on tax consulting and transactional advice to foreign investors doing business in Mexico and advising Mexican investors on their investments overseas. His special emphasis is on real estate, corporate and securities, as well as mergers and acquisitions.
“It’s important that we educate our community about Israel, and I’m proud Anshai Torah makes that a priority, not only by hosting world-renowned scholars, but also by leading a large delegation to AIPAC’s annual Policy Conference,” said Manuel, a leader in CAT’s Israel education and advocacy programming.
Chair of Dallas’ AIPAC chapter and a member of AIPAC’s National Council and vice chair of its New Leadership Network, Manuel says, “Israel is a true light unto the nations, and we must do all we can to protect her. In partnership with Anshai, protecting Israel has become one my main missions in life.”
The couple, who met while she was based in Chicago and he was working there temporarily, married in 1999. A job opportunity moved Manuel to the Metroplex, and it became home. As they began their family, it was important to the couple to find a congregation: a Jewish connection and a community with which to surround themselves. In Anshai Torah, they found all of that and more.
“From the time our children started preschool, this has been our second home and we care so much about everything that goes on here,” Debbie said. “When I create a list of friends in my mind, so many we can count are from Anshai. With all of them, our family has ‘grown up’ along with Anshai.”
The two have set the example as strongly identified and committed Jews for their children, Abby and Josh, who as teenagers are now involved in Anshai Torah’s DeReKH Hebrew High and youth programs.
“Our responsibility is to be involved in every aspect of our kids’ lives and to make a better community for them,” Debbie said. “Through Anshai, and its teachers, rabbis and everyone who cares about the synagogue we’re providing a spiritual, religious and personally connective space for them to become strong Jews and strong people. In doing that, we continue to grow, too.”
Providing their family with positive Jewish experiences is foremost, echoed Manuel, saying “Anshai Torah is about active engagement by its clergy, active involvement by its members, and the warmth and welcoming sense that is felt,” reminiscent of his own childhood shul — “a haimesh home.”
For tickets ($75 each) or sponsorships to Diamonds and Dice, call 972-473-7718, email receptionist@anshaitorah.org or visit anshaitorah.org.

—Submitted by
Deb Silverthorn
on behalf of Anshai Torah.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Community Read leads to ‘Promised Land’

Community Read leads to ‘Promised Land’

Posted on 29 November 2018 by admin

Photo: Courtesy Martin Fletcher
Martin Fletcher will speak about his book “Promised Land” at 7 p.m. Dec. 6 at the Tycher Library Community Read, part of the JCC BookFest, at the Aaron Family JCC.

By Deb Silverthorn

Martin Fletcher’s discussion of his novel “Promised Land” guarantees a special evening at the Tycher Library Community Read, beginning at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6, at the library, on the second floor of the Aaron Family JCC.
The event, part of the 2018/2019 Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Dallas Jewish BookFest, is co-sponsored by the Center for Jewish Education (CJE) of the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, with the support of the Jewish Book Council.
“Martin Fletcher’s writing style is incredible, and with ‘Promised Land,’ he has given us a very new look at a Holocaust story — this is anything but typical,” said Karen Schlosberg, CJE coordinator of projects and administration. “(He is) a charismatic journalist and author with a great reputation. We were thrilled to secure him for our Tycher Library Community Read.”
The annual Community Read is a free lecture, designed to encourage readers, book club participants and individuals to share a book. This is the library’s 12th annual event.
“Promised Land,” the first of a trilogy Fletcher is creating, covers the first 20 years of Israel’s development and ends with the occupation of the West Bank and Gaza in 1967. It is the story of Arie, a business magnate, and Peter, a Mossad agent. They are two Jewish brothers born in Germany, separated during the war, with the rest of their family murdered at the hands of the Nazis.
The story begins when 14-year-old Peter is sent west to America to escape the growing horror of Nazi Germany while younger brother Arie and their family are sent east, to the Nazi death camps. Only Arie returns. The brothers reunite in the new Jewish state, where they both fall in love with Tamara, a Jewish refugee from Cairo. Over two decades, their intrigues and jealousies threaten to tear their new lives apart.
Arie becomes a businessman and one of the richest men in Israel. Peter becomes a top Mossad agent heading some of Israel’s most vital espionage operations. “One brother builds Israel,” Fletcher said, “and the other protects it.”
“Martin Fletcher is a treasure, and we couldn’t be more excited about this event. He was here the first year I started at the J, presenting his Breaking News, and I’m thrilled to welcome him back,” said Rachelle Weiss Crane, JCC’s director of Israel engagement and Jewish living, who worked on the event with lay BookFest Chair Liz Liener. “He is an incredible researcher and author who we know offers a good, trusted story. He’s been so generous with his time and he has a special place in my heart. Our guests will not be disappointed.”
Fletcher, who also wrote “Walking Israel,” “The List,” “Jacob’s Oath,” and “The War Reporter,” spent 32 years at NBC as a foreign correspondent based in London, Brussels, Israel, Rhodesia, South Africa, Paris and Frankfurt — 26 of those years covering the Middle East, 15 as news bureau chief in Tel Aviv. He has received many honors, including the National Jewish Book Award, a Columbia University DuPont Award, several Overseas Press Club and five Emmy awards.
“This trilogy is really a ‘Dallas’ meets ‘Exodus’ story, following the generations of a family and the building of a country,” Fletcher said. “I started out writing a nonfiction book about the history of the State of Israel, but I realized I wanted to tell the story of the land, not the history. As a journalist, even though this is fiction, it is still important for me to get it right — to have a storyline that accurately reflects the reality.”
While this series is completely fictional, Fletcher said he received help from those whose lives mimicked the stories he tells, from businessmen who raised the dollars to help Herzliya grow in the early 1950s to former Mossad agents who provided authenticity and background.
“Tom Brokaw wrote of ‘The Greatest Generation’ and I wanted to tell of Israel’s greatest generation,” Fletcher said. “The surviving 20-year-olds of 1948 are now gone or in their 90s. I wanted fact to become fiction, but with lots of facts. How this incredible country was built from scratch by a generation amid anti-Semitism and Nazism; from the camps these displaced people made their way to Israel, and fought three wars. As a journalist, my focus is always on who did what, when and where, but not always what it’s like to be those people, to be there.”
Calling Israel, Mexico and New York home, Fletcher is often on the road. He and his artist wife, Hagar, a Sabra and former sergeant of the IDF whom he met while she was hitchhiking, are the parents of sons Daniel, Guy and Jonathan, and grandparents of Gali.
“Martin Fletcher balances the contributions of Ashkenazi Jews, Jews from the West, Sephardic Jews and Jews from the Arab lands to Israel’s success. The story poignantly grapples with the tragedy and scars of the Holocaust by telling the story of two brothers who reflect the challenges facing the fledgling state,” said Tycher Librarian Judy Borejdo. “‘Promised Land’ brings to life the first 20 years of Israel’s existence, which were a historic challenge for the Jewish people.”
As Fletcher says, “Promised Land” is “a love story set to a historical backdrop — the story of a nation, through the story of its people.”
For more information or to RSVP (requested by Dec. 3), email kschlosberg@jewishdallas.org, call 214-239-7131 or visit jewishdallas.org/communityread.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Blueprint for modern Judaism

Blueprint for modern Judaism

Posted on 29 November 2018 by admin

Photo: Courtesy Tal Keinan
Author Tal Keinan and Congregation Anshai Torah Rabbi Stefan Weinberg will lead a conversation about Keinan’s “God is in the Crowd” at 7 p.m. Dec. 10 at the JCC as part of the JCC’s BookFest.

By Deb Silverthorn

Congregation Anshai Torah Rabbi Stefan Weinberg and author Tal Keinan will discuss Keinan’s “God is in The Crowd” at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10, at the Aaron Family JCC as part of the 2018/2019 Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Dallas Jewish BookFest.
Israel Bonds is presenting the event.
“Tal has written a book filled with passion, and his personal history has introduced him to a wide variety of Jewish settings and Jewish values. Together, these experiences have compelled him to seek an answer to the many challenges facing Judaism,” Weinberg said. “Realizing that assimilation is destroying the Jewish community, he attempts to rescue the Jewish people, and Tal’s book reflects his bold thinking as well as his passion for Judaism’s continuity.
“Combining his private school experience in New England with his stint as a pilot in the IDF, Tal tells a compelling story that invites the reader to listen,” Weinberg continued. “This is a special opportunity to listen to a new voice advocating for action, someone who is unwilling to let our Jewish vitality slip away, someone who is willing to fight for the future of the Jewish people.”
“God Is in the Crowd” is a blueprint for Judaism in the 21st century, presented through the lens of the author’s personal story, analyzing the threat to Jewish continuity, according to publicity statements.
“Tal Keinan’s book is very well-written, innovative and a fresh look at solutions for some of the challenges the Jewish people face today,” said JCC BookFest Chair Liz Liener, working for the sixth year with Rachelle Weiss Crane, JCC’s director of Israel engagement and Jewish living.
As the Jewish people have become concentrated in America and Israel, Keinan writes of the loss of a subtle code of governance that endowed Judaism with dynamism and relevance in the age of Diaspora.
This code, Keinan explains, is derived from Francis Galton’s “wisdom of crowds,” in which a group’s collective intelligence, memory and spirituality can be dramatically different from, and often stronger than, that of any individual members. He argues that without this code, this ancient people — and the civilization that it spawned — will soon be extinct. Keinan puts forward a plan to rewrite the Jewish code, proposing a new model for Judaism and for community in general.
“Over the past 20 years, I have searched for a satisfying definition of the value of Judaism. I have discovered a complex moral map, which has preserved an ancient wisdom while incorporating the amendments and refinements of successive generations through an exquisitely subtle code,” said Keinan. “‘God Is in the Crowd’ is my diagnosis of the break in the Jewish code and a prescription for rewriting it. Although the book has been described in literary terms, it is not art. It is a battle plan. I hope to draw a critical mass of thinkers, a group I describe as ‘the Crowd,’ into a process that drafts a Jewish future with the goal not just of surviving, but of creating sustainable purpose and meaning in Judaism.”
Keinan, an entrepreneur and social activist, has a master’s degree in business administration from Harvard Business School and is a graduate of Israel’s Air Force Academy. He is co-founder of Clarity Capital, and chairman of Koret Israel Economic Development Funds, Israel’s largest nonprofit lender to small and micro businesses. He serves on the boards of directors of the Steinhardt Foundation for Jewish Life and the HESEG Foundation, which provides academic scholarships for qualified applicants and former lone soldiers. He is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum and chairman of the YPO (Young Presidents Organization) Intercontinental Chapter.
Keinan was born and raised in a secular family in Florida; his interest in Judaism was ignited by a Christian minister at his New England prep school, leading him down the unlikely path to enlistment in the Israel Air Force.
“We need to acknowledge that Israel is a means, not an end. It is not a regular country but a vital asset for the entire Jewish people. It is the physical refuge, the intellectual convening point and the spiritual center of Judaism,” Keinan said. “Israeli Jews often forget this. It is easier to conceive of themselves within the category of country, a geographic entity representing the people who live within its physical borders. That is part of what Israel is, but it is not the whole story. I argue that it is not even the interesting part of the story.”
Keinan continues that American Jews also forget. “We are lucky to live in times of security and prosperity, in a society that embraces us as full members. It is easy to forget that this is an exception to the rule of Jewish history, that, even today, there are Jews who are less lucky,” he said. “Both communities are losing sight of the legacy that has been left in our custody, a legacy with great value, not only to the Jews but to the world, but I think we can bridge the gap and reclaim that legacy.”
“Tal is charming, brilliant, and engaging and I’m excited to have helped coordinate his visit to our BookFest,” said Event Chair Lizzy Greif. “He’s incredibly accomplished and meaningful and I believe that everyone who attends will learn something, grow, and appreciate what he has to share.”
Tickets are $10 each until 3 p.m. Dec. 10 and $15 after. Books ($28) will be available for purchase at the event.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Yavneh: 25 years of Jewish education — and more

Yavneh: 25 years of Jewish education — and more

Posted on 27 November 2018 by admin

Photo: Courtesy Yavneh Academy
The Class of 2008

By Amy Sorter

Alex Radunsky decided to attend Yavneh Academy of Dallas for one reason: Most of his Akiba Academy of Dallas friends were going there. Radunsky would graduate in 1998, Yavneh’s first graduating class, though at the time, he was unaware of whether, or if, the school would survive.
“At the time, we didn’t have a clear sense of trajectory of the school as an institution,” said Radunsky, who is pursuing a Ph.D. in Global Health at Harvard University. “Those first two years, things were a little haphazard, but I didn’t mind it at all. I enjoyed it. It was fun and empowering to help set the tone of the institution.”
Twenty-five years after its launch in a small building on the campus of the Aaron Family Jewish Community Center, Yavneh has grown into a well-respected, highly acclaimed preparatory Dallas-area Jewish high school.
The school’s focus is that of modern Orthodox study, combined with stringent secular education. Yet, Yavneh’s overall goal is to “appeal to the entire Jewish community, regardless of observance or denomination,” said David Radunsky, Alex’s father and a member of one of Yavneh’s founding families.
Added Rabbi Howard Wolk, who led Congregation Shaare Tefilla at Yavneh’s founding and is now community chaplain for Jewish Family Service of Dallas: “Yavneh allowed Jewish kids to continue their Jewish education, and for them to be with other Jewish kids.” Wolk, one of Yavneh’s founders and among its first teachers, sent his three sons to Yavneh.

Keeping Jews in DFW

While Deena Zucker was attending seventh grade at Akiba during the early 1990s, parents Michael and Karen Zucker faced a difficult decision. The family would have to send their eldest child out of town for a Jewish high-school education. This dilemma prompted the Zuckers to join other families interested in forming a local Jewish high school.
“I didn’t want to send her out of town,” Michael Zucker said. “I didn’t want my child being raised by someone else.” Deena and her siblings Sara and Arye ended up attending and graduating from Yavneh. Meanwhile, the Zuckers’ youngest, Nachi, will graduate in 2019.
The Radunsky family faced a similar issue, though at the opposite end of the familial lifecycle. The three Radunsky children attended Akiba, with the older two ending up at a secular private school. However, Alex, the youngest, had “become taken with Orthodoxy,” David Radunsky said. “Our family had, by accident, turned into one of those in which we had to decide to send our kid away to school.”
Yavneh allowed both families, and others, to keep the children home, while keeping other Jewish families anchored to the region. Wolk commented that one of the school’s main benefactors, Oscar Rosenberg, had a strong sense that, without a Jewish high school, families not wanting to send their children out of town would leave. “Yavneh helped us hold on to important families in the community,” he said.
Furthermore, many Yavneh graduates return and become active in the Dallas Jewish community. Said Wolk: “The ones I know are all active in their congregations and community; many have served on the Yavneh board. The community continues to reap the benefits.”

Photo: Sharon Wisch-Ray
From the TJP file: Ecstatic to break ground on the Schultz-Rosenberg Campus on May 9, 2004 were, from left, the late Marcus Rosenberg, Ann Rosenberg, Howard Schultz and the late Leslie Schultz.

Judaism…and beyond

Though a Jewish curriculum is a highlight, Yavneh also focuses on a rigorous secular program. David Radunsky pointed out that the goal of the school, overall, was to provide an outstanding preparatory school for college and life.
“It’s an opportunity to have an excellent, small private-school experience, which focuses on education and strong student-teacher relationships,” said David Portnoy, Yavneh’s head of school. “College admissions deans have told us they find Jewish high-school graduates very well prepared to take on the workload and time management of college,” Portnoy said.
Daniel Bonner, a 2008 Yavneh graduate, discussed the student-driven environment and the emphasis on self-reliance and independence. “If there was something you wanted to study, you could study it,” said Bonner, now director of Jewish and Israel philanthropy at the Paul E. Singer Foundation in New York. “No question, or opinion, was off limits. Yavneh taught us how to be curious, not anxious, about new ideas.”
Furthermore, the students found a flexibility that might not have been possible in other school settings. Alex Radunsky tells the story of Advanced Placement (AP) classes, with one of the first being a physics class. “But I said I didn’t want to take AP physics. I was more interested in AP biology,” Alex recalled. Yavneh managed to include an AP biology class for Alex and another student. “The institution put a lot of energy into making that happen,” he said.
Yet, at the beginning, Zucker, Yavneh past president, acknowledged the risks in sending his eldest daughter to a school that, in its first five years of existence, relocated at least five times, had a handful of teachers and a series of heads of school.
“Yavneh was fully accredited,” he said. “But no one had ever heard of it when Deena graduated.” Yet all the Zucker children who graduated from Yavneh ended up with outstanding grades and are pursuing meaningful careers.
“I am the proud father of three independent children,” Zucker said, noting that he expects Nachi to be equally independent. “These guys will stay together, build friendships and an extended family you can’t duplicate, outside of the college experience.”
Alex Radunsky pointed out that most of the students in his class of 1998 spent a gap year in Israel following graduation to continue their studies. As a result, “we were positioned to represent ourselves well,” he said. “Even if institutions had been skeptical of our high school, they saw us, saw our applications and what we’d accomplished.”
Bonner agreed, adding that the Jewish day school education offers more than, well, a good Jewish education.
“As you grow up and make your way in the world, it isn’t just about a degree or the title you have, but the kind of person you are,” he said. “Yavneh, by virtue of the fact it offers education rooted in Jewish values, is producing good people in a dark world that needs more of them.”

Polishing the crystal ball

Portnoy and others stress the need for the school to be a self-sustaining entity and to continue being a student-driven school with outstanding instruction. This, in turn, requires continuous funding and endowments, which is why the Pam Hochster Fine and Jeffrey R. Fine Yavneh Academy Scholarship Endowment Fund (see sidebar), as well as other donations and endowments, are so important. Such resources help the school continue recruiting and retaining excellent teachers, Portnoy said.
Still, as Yavneh celebrates its silver anniversary, it is a success. The school has its own campus. Its students graduate and attend prestigious colleges that include Harvard, Yale, Stanford and the University of Texas. On the sports side, the Yavneh boys’ soccer and basketball teams have made it to state and national finals. “We’re on the map now, both in terms of North Texas schools and national Jewish schools,” Portnoy said.
For Zucker, the school’s ability to focus on core values has been very important. “We can’t control how our children decide to practice religion after they leave our care,” he observed. “The best we can do is give them a foundation of our core values.”
Meanwhile, Alex Radunsky now understands the trajectory from Yavneh’s early classes to where the school is today. “It’s wonderful to see how the founding families and new families contributed to this wonderful enterprise,” he commented. “It makes me proud to be one of the early students at this institution.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Tarrant shuls plant daffodils, remember Holocaust victims

Tarrant shuls plant daffodils, remember Holocaust victims

Posted on 15 November 2018 by admin

Photo: Courtesy of Ahavath Sholom
Ahavath Sholom religious school students plant bulbs as part of the Daffodil Project, Nov. 11. They marked their bulbs with decorated stones.

Last year, the TJP shared the story of Grace Goldman. The then-Fort Worth Country Day Senior who brought The Daffodil Project to her school to honor the memory of her great-grandmother Blanche, who survived Auschwitz and the 1.5 million children who perished in the Holocaust.
This year, Goldman’s grandmother Rachel Goldman (Blanche’s daughter) and Debra Rosenthal helped the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County underwrite the project to include all Tarrant County congregations.
The bulbs were supplied and purchased through Am Yisrael Chai, an Atlanta-based Holocaust education and awareness organization.
On Nov. 11, the project came to fruition when Congregation Ahavath Sholom, Beth-El Congregation, Congregation Beth Israel and Congregation Beth Shalom planted the bulbs.
“We are grateful to the leadership and financial support of Rachel and Michael Goldman for making this special project possible and we are proud to have partnered with them. Thanks to their leadership, many of our community organizations are participating and this will be a wonderful ongoing teaching tool to help our children understand the horrors of the Holocaust and to remember the 1.5 million children who perished,” Federation Executive Director Bob Goldberg said.
At Congregation Beth Shalom in Arlington, 40 Sunday school children and congregants gathered to plant 500 yellow daffodil bulbs.
In Colleyville, a member of the congregation working on his Eagle Scout project coordinated the synagogue’s efforts, according to Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker.
Rabbi Andrew Bloom of Congregation Ahavath Sholom was pleased his synagogue participated.
“The Daffodil Project that Ahavath Sholom, along with a multitude of other local and national synagogues, participated in reminds me of a quote by Elie Wiesel, which states, ‘For the dead and the living, we must bear witness.’ It was in this light that we planted the daffodil bulbs, for their planting by our children and the care that will go into them binds our students in a real and concrete manner with the perpetuation of memory and continuing education of the Holocaust in a real and meaningful manner.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

View or Subscribe to the
Texas Jewish Post

Advertise Here

Photos from our Flickr stream

See all photos

Advertise Here