Archive | News

Maccabiah Games results

Posted on 20 July 2017 by admin

Staff report

The 2017 Maccabiah Games ran July 4-16. Here is a list of results and updates since last week’s issue:

Open (College-young adult)

  • Chayse Bauer (soccer), of Frisco, and the women’s team fell to Israel, 2-1, in the final, but won every other game.
  • Hayley Isenberg (basketball), of Dallas, scored 2 points in a 72-36 win over Australia, 2 points in a 77-63 semifinal win over Russia and helped defeat Israel, 71-61, to win gold.
  • Samuel Rabb (rugby), of Dallas, is a member of the rugby delegation. The Sevens squad claimed fifth place with a 35-0 win over France, while the Fifteens team won gold with wins over Australia, Israel, Argentina and South Africa, with the latter coming in the finals.
  • Sarah Weisberg (gymnastics), of Plano, is the daughter of Jonathan and Grace Weisberg. The gymnasts  competed in beam, floor, uneven bars, vaults and all-around events.

Juniors (Youth)

  • Omer Dannenberg-Lerner (gymnastics), of Plano, won gold in beam with 12.100 score  — .400 above silver. She tied for bronze in floor exercise with Lihi Raz of Israel at 11.650. She and Haymann (see below) earned silver in the team competition.
  • Kaya Haymann (gymnastics), of Dallas, also competed in the beam, floor, vaults and uneven bars. She and Dannenberg-Lerner (see above) earned silver in the team competition.
  • Ashley Isenberg (basketball), of Dallas, scored 2 points in 63-31 pool-play win over Canada, list to Israel, 97-41. The team defeated Australia, 66-49, but came up short against Israel in the final, 83-43.
  • Griffin Levine (basketball), of Dallas, scored 8 points in pool-play, 94-55 win over Canada and added another 15 in 121-26 win over Mexico. He also scored four points in a 118-35 win over Australia. Levine scored 12 points and the team defeated Israel, 92-80, to win gold.
  • Hannah Mandel (soccer), of Frisco, helped defeat Australia, 11-0, in pool play. The team defeated Canada, 4-0, in the semifinal and beat Israel, 2-0, to win gold.

Masters (Adults)

  • Linda Leftin (tennis), of Dallas, began competition after deadline July 12, but no individual results have been posted.
  • Michael Rubenstein (basketball), of Houston, is the son-in-law of Janine and Charles Pulman of Dallas. He scored 2 points in 73-57 win over Australia and 7 points in 68-67 loss to Russia. He reached double digits with 11 points in a 98-56 win over Chile. He scored 3 points in a 94-81 loss to Israel, but scored 8 points to claim bronze with a 79-68 win over Argentina.

    In addition, Brianne Lawton, of Denton, is an athletic trainer for Team USA.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Rabbis with Texas ties on ‘blacklist’

Rabbis with Texas ties on ‘blacklist’

Posted on 17 July 2017 by admin

Israel’s Chief Rabbinate doesn’t trust list to vouch for engaged couples’ Jewishness

By Rick Press
Special to TJP

In 2017, the notion of a “blacklist” — particularly one involving rabbis — seems almost unthinkable.
And that may explain the howls of complaint surrounding last week’s revelation that Israel’s Chief Rabbinate had compiled a list of 160 rabbis — 66 from the United States and at least one from Texas — who, essentially, would not be trusted to vouch for the Jewishness of immigrants wishing to get married in Israel.

Ken Roseman

Ken Roseman

Itim, the immigrant advocacy group that filed a freedom of information request to acquire the names, dubbed it a “blacklist,” and the group’s leader, Rabbi Seth Farber, said it reflects the ultra-Orthodox Rabbinate’s distrust of Jewish communities beyond Israel’s borders.
“It’s telling 160 Jewish communities around the world ….your rabbi is not a rabbi,” Farber told the Associated Press. “The baseline assumption is that no one can be trusted.”
Kobi Alter, a spokesman for the Chief Rabbinate, was in full damage-control mode Wednesday, insisting that the list was not an attempt to delegitimize the rabbis but rather was a reflection of requests that were rejected in 2016 because of  missing documents or technicalities.
“Every case has a different explanation,” he told NPR.
Reactions from rabbis who made the list were mixed: some were perplexed, some defiant, others outraged.
Rabbi Kenneth D. Roseman, rabbi emeritus at Beth Israel Congregation in Corpus Christi, said he was unsure why he made the list but he viewed his inclusion with “a wry smile” and “contempt for the corruption in the Haredi,” the ultra-Orthodox sector of Israeli society that controls the rabbinate.
“The publication of this list will only alienate even more diaspora Jews who want to support Israel,” said Roseman, who served as senior rabbi at Temple Shalom in Dallas for 17 years before moving to Corpus Christi. “Too often, they go through traditional motions, but ignore the essential ethical values of Judaism.”
Roseman was in prominent company. Rabbi Adam Scheier of Montreal, who is close with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, was on the list. So was Daniel Krauss of Kehilath Yeshurun Synagogue in New York, where U.S. President Donald Trump’s daughter, Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, were congregants. (Another former Texas rabbi, Alberto Zeilicovich, was also on the list. The Argentine-born leader of Congregation Beth Shalom in Fair Lawn, New Jersey, was formerly rabbi at Congregation Ahavath Sholom in Fort Worth.) Also, on the list was Houston’s beloved Rabbi Joseph Radinsky of United Orthodox Synagogue.
“I have received a number of congratulatory letters from colleagues, many asking how they could have the ‘honor’ of being on the list,” said Roseman in an email. “When I announced my listing to the congregation (Friday) night, there was applause and approbation.”
A group of 13 California rabbis even sent a letter to the Rabbinate asking that their names be added to the list, as a show of solidarity.

Rabbi Alberto Zeilicovich of Congregation Ahavath Shalom in Fort Worth photographed July 1, 2008. (Photo/ Richard W. Rodriguez)

Rabbi Alberto Zeilicovich of Congregation Ahavath Shalom in Fort Worth photographed July 1, 2008. (Photo/ Richard W. Rodriguez)

Rabbi Brian Zimmerman of Beth El Congregation in Fort Worth was not on the “blacklist,” but he believes the fallout surrounding it should be a cautionary tale.
“We’ve always known that our decisions would be challenged by a very small group in Israel. But ultimately this is about power. It’s not about religion,” said Zimmerman. “This is why you should separate synagogue and state.”
The Chief Rabbinate has sole jurisdiction over many aspects of Jewish life in Israel, including marriage, divorce and burials. And the ultra-Orthodox group has rejected thousands of requests from international rabbis in recent years.
Israeli Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi David Lau said in a letter of apology that “the list’s intention was not to invalidate rabbis, God forbid, but rather to invalidate letters that raised doubts and questions.”
But Roseman and many others weren’t buying that explanation.
He said, if asked, he wouldn’t hesitate to write another letter on behalf of a congregant.
“I’ll tell the truth,” he said, “and if some Haredi in Israel doesn’t like the way I dot my “I” or cross my “t,” that’s too bad.
“The Chief Rabbinate may want to hold the line in opposition to the modern world,” he added, “but that strikes me as effective as if a peewee football team were to play the Dallas Cowboys. They will eventually disappear from power; their days are numbered. as they should be.”

Zeilicovich had an opinion on the matter as well.
“It’s clearly a dividing policy, and it’s very, very sad that the State of Israel is telling a huge part of the Jewish people you are not recognized here,” said Zeilicovich. “I have more religious rights in a non-Jewish country, like the United States, than in my own Jewish country.”
Zeilicovich returned from Israel on Monday and he said tensions were running high iafter the blacklist was released. Conservative and Reform Jews were making their voices heard.
“There was a huge outrage. The fact that rabbis are being discriminated against by the Rabbinate, it is very concerning. And it’s not just the rabbis it’s the Conservative movement. They disenfranchise Jews,” he said. “And who are they, who gave them the power to do that? They’ve got political power. This is a political problem, not a religious problem.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Va. mayor to talk career, Congressional shooting

Va. mayor to talk career, Congressional shooting

Posted on 13 July 2017 by admin

Allison Silberberg and her parents Barbara and Al, at the future mayor of Alexandria, Virgina’s graduation from American University. “I absolutely hear my parents belief in me,” said Mayor Silberberg. “They set the example for a life of doing good.”

Allison Silberberg and her parents Barbara and Al, at the future mayor of Alexandria, Virgina’s graduation from American University. “I absolutely hear my parents belief in me,” said Mayor Silberberg. “They set the example for a life of doing good.”

Dallas native Silberberg guiding DC-suburb Alexandria

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, recently made a comment that defines the translation of l’dor v’dor — from generation to generation.
“Only together can we preserve what our ancestors left to us,” she said. “We are all the temporary stewards of this national treasure called Alexandria.”
Silberberg will share her story at 3 p.m. Thursday, July 20, at The Legacy at Willow Bend.

“Life is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world,” said Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, who will speak at The Legacy at Willow Bend July 20.

“Life is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world,” said Dallas native Allison Silberberg, the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, who will speak at The Legacy at Willow Bend July 20.

Silberberg’s city quickly gained the national spotlight after June 14, when a gunman shot Republican lawmakers at Eugene Simpson Stadium Park. Capitol Police Special Agent David Bailey, Congressional Aide Zachary Barth, Capitol Police Special Crystal Griner, Tyson Foods lobbyist Matt Mika and Representative Steve Scalise, the House Majority Whip, all were injured during the attack. The gunman, James Hodgkinson, died in a shootout with police.
“This has been a shocking time but Alexandria responded with action,” Silberberg said. “We continue to pray for the wounded. To our first responders, who saved the lives of many, there aren’t enough thanks, and to our strong residents, who came out for days offering cool drinks, baked goods and their hearts. You can’t manufacture ‘community,’ and Alexandria has it overflowing.”
Silberberg, a Hillcrest High School graduate with a B.A. from American University and a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of California, Los Angeles, is the daughter of the late Al and Barbara and sister of Dana and Susan. She grew up at Temple Emanu-El and was a second-generation member of BBYO’s Jennie Zesmer chapter.

(left to right) Dana, Susan, and Allison Silberbergs’ futures were in bloom long before their futures were known. Today, Allison is the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia.

(left to right) Dana, Susan, and Allison Silberbergs’ futures were in bloom long before their futures were known. Today, Allison is the mayor of Alexandria, Virginia.

Silberberg says her love for service was taught by her parents, rabbis and a caring community that she calls very special and it’s her parents’ encouraging voices that she feels in her heart. Her mother’s volunteering at her schools, working on political campaigns, including those of Adlene Harrison and Ann Richards, and her appointment to the Texas State Library and Archives Commission set the bar. Barbara Silberberg also shared her example through active membership in both National Council of Jewish Women and the family’s synagogue. Temple Emanu-El’s Rabbi Kimberly Herzog Cohen says Silberberg lives the heart of her heritage.
“Mayor Silberberg exemplifies that value of service we seek to cultivate as Jews, here at Temple and beyond,” said Rabbi Herzog Cohen. “We’re inspired by and grateful for the ways she pursues tzedakah, charity that helps those in need, and tzedek, justice, at the heart of systemic change.”
Silberberg’s career began as a writer and photographer — which could easily be the focus of a chapter in her book, Visionaries in Our Midst: Ordinary People Who Are Changing Our World. The Society for Women’s Health Research commissioned Silberberg to co-author a book and she created a bound legacy in her commissioned memoir And Life Will Be a Beautiful Dream: A Book about Peggy and Alvin Brown. Her writing appeared on PBS.org in conjunction with Ken Burns’ and Lynn Novick’s The War and David Grubin’s The Jewish Americans. Her talents broad, she’s written for politicians and an episode of Mama’s Family.
Silberberg’s career includes an internship with Senator Edward Kennedy; her role as chief editor and chief research assistant for Senator Lloyd M. Bentsen; being the founding leader of Lights, Camera, Action! — a nonprofit to mentor youth as well as grant making to nonprofits; serving on the World Bank’s community outreach grants committee; and serving on the City of Alexandria’s Economic Opportunities Commission, also as its chair.
While leading a monthly community service group called the Film Biz Happy Hour, which she founded to make contacts, have fun and make a difference all at once, more than $50,000 was raised for nonprofits. When she asked to run for office, it was an idea whose time had come. After being Alexandria’s vice-mayor, she was elected to lead Nov. 3, 2015. This April, she was a panelist at the U.S. Conference of Mayors, regarding vacant and abandoned properties and issues of aging.
“It’s about rolling up your sleeves and getting work done, and it’s the work that matters,” said Silberberg. “It’s an honor to see what’s possible, and to be a part of making the possible happen.”
For Bob Weinfeld, who has interviewed more than 50 guests at The Legacy, hosting Silberberg is an honor.
“It’s absolutely a genuine honor to interview Madame Mayor,” said Weinfeld, who will spend the day of Silberberg’s visit celebrating his 91st birthday. “She’s lived a fascinating life and it seems to be more so every day. Our community should be, and we are, so proud of her.”
Weinfeld’s daughter Brenda Bliss, one of many hometown friends with whom she’s close, echoes her father’s esteem of Silberberg.
“Allison is loyal, honest, objective and a good listener. She’s open to ideas while strong in her convictions and committed to the causes that matter to her,” said Bliss, whose friendship with Silberberg spans teenage tennis court matches and BBYO experiences, as well as the years they both attended graduate school in Southern California.

(left to right) Sally Waxler Oscherwitz, Caryn Statman Kboudi and Allison Silberberg, now Mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, when the threesome were BBYO best friends.

(left to right) Sally Waxler Oscherwitz, Caryn Statman Kboudi and Allison Silberberg, now Mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, when the threesome were BBYO best friends.

“Allison has been interested in politics for as long as I’ve known her and she is successful because she wants to fix things and make them better. She’s always wanted to problem solve,” said Bliss. “She’s always been a great friend and I’m so proud of all that she has accomplished.”
For Silberberg, what she’s accomplished, and what she continues to pursue, all of which her friends, family and supporters are proud of, is giving her heart, talent, expertise and dedication each day, serving in a life that she says “is all a mitzvah project, a chance to live the tenet of tikun olam, repairing the world.”
For more information about the July 20 program at The Legacy at Willow Bend, or to RSVP, email robert.weinfeld@tx.rr.com.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

20th Maccabiah Games results

Posted on 13 July 2017 by admin

Staff report

The 2017 Maccabiah Games began July 4 and run through July 16. Here is a list of results and an upcoming schedule as of press deadline Tuesday night:

Open (College-young adult skill level)

  • Chayse Bauer (soccer), of Frisco, and the women’s team shut out Brazil and Great Britain by a combined 11-0 margin. Team USA played Australia on Wednesday and is in good position to win gold in the playoffs, which begin July 13.
  • Hayley Isenberg (basketball), of Dallas, who is featured in the attached story, scored four points in a 68-62 loss to Israel after a dominant 101-71 win over Russia. The team played Australia on Wednesday before playoffs, which begin July 14.
  • Samuel Rabb (rugby), of Dallas, is a member of the rugby delegation. The Sevens squad claimed fifth place with a 35-0 win over France, while the Fifteens team defeated Australia, 29-11, and faced Israel on Wednesday. Playoffs begin July 13.
  • Sarah Weisberg (gymnastics), of Plano, is the daughter of Jonathan and Grace Weisberg. The gymnasts  competed in beam, floor, uneven bars, vaults and all-around events. Her quest for a medal continues through July 13.

Juniors (Youth)

  • Omer Dannenberg-Lerner (gymnastics), of Plano, won gold in beam with 12.100 score  — .400 above silver. She tied for bronze in floor exercise with Lihi Raz of Israel at 11.650. Gymnastics continues through July 13. She and Haymann (see below) earned silver in the team competition.
  • Kaya Haymann (gymnastics), of Dallas, also competed in the beam, floor, vaults and uneven bars, and will continue to compete through July 13. She and Dannenberg-Lerner (see above) earned silver in the team competition.
  • Ashley Isenberg (basketball), of Dallas, scored 2 points in 63-31 pool-play win over Canada. The team faces Australia on Tuesday and Israel on Wednesday. Playoffs begin July 13.
  • Griffin Levine (basketball), of Dallas, scored 8 points in pool-play, 94-55 win over Canada and added another 15 in 121-26 win over Mexico. He also scored four points in a 118-35 win over Australia. He begins the playoffs July 13.
  • Hannah Mandel (soccer), of Frisco, helped defeat Australia, 11-0, in pool play. The team faced Brazil on Tuesday, but no results were available. She begins playoffs July 13.

Masters (Adults)

  • Linda Leftin (tennis), of Dallas, began competition after deadline July 12.
  • Michael Rubenstein (basketball), of Houston, is the son-in-law of Janine and Charles Pulman of Dallas. He scored 2 points in 73-57 win over Australia and 7 points in 68-67 loss to Russia. He reached double digits with 11 points in a 98-56 win over Chile on Tuesday. He faced Israel on Wednesday, and will face Argentina on Thursday. The playoffs will all be completed July 16.

    In addition, Brianne Lawton, of Denton, is an athletic trainer for Team USA.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Weinsteins’ business in perennial bloom

Weinsteins’ business in perennial bloom

Posted on 13 July 2017 by admin

Petals & Stems celebrates 45 years of flower service

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

For Dotty and Lew Weinstein — and their son Brad — their business has smelled sweeter with every prepared bouquet during the past 45 years.
“The business of Petals & Stems is about special moments — we’ve been a part of thousands of memories. What an incredible business this is,” said Lew, the Weinstein patriarch who opened the doors to Petals & Stems in June 1972.

Submitted photo (From left) Lew, Dotty, and Brad Weinstein have a blooming business in Petals & Stems florist, celebrating 45 years this summer. For most of those years, the family has run their business from the same Montfort Drive storefront.

Submitted photo
(From left) Lew, Dotty, and Brad Weinstein have a blooming business in Petals & Stems florist, celebrating 45 years this summer. For most of those years, the family has run their business from the same Montfort Drive storefront.

With a strong business sense and experience, but a business partner who wilted and left him sole owner, a budding legacy was created.
Always in the same Montfort Drive shopping center, resettling a few doors away at one point, Petals & Stems has a history, and client list, that is lasting. They’ve delivered customer service and stunning floral artistry for generations of families — from baby celebrations to bar mitzvahs and boutonnieres, from weddings to funeral arrangements. Each customer, each posy: precious.
“On countless occasions Petals & Stems made my tables look and smell so beautiful,” said Carol Gene Cohen, whose family has been listed in the Weinsteins’ Rolodex for years. “They did the flowers for four bar mitzvahs, two weddings and more celebrations and dinners. Every arrangement has been stunning.”
Dotty and Lew are the parents of Brad (spouse Keri), Jeff (Ava), and Lori (Grant), and grandparents of Ansley, Ari, Brice, Gabe and Jill. The family’s best vacations, to Colorado, Lake Tahoe, and this year to San Francisco, are for tables of 13.
In 1997, Brad joined his parents, and for the last two decades the generations have worked hand in hand. With more than 20 employees, and a business that continues to blossom, Lew takes care of the bills, receivables, and payroll while Brad handles the day-to-day operations.
“I grew up riding with deliveries, never thinking the store would be my future, but I’ve loved working with my parents. They’re great people, great business owners, and great examples of working hard and providing exceptional care to their customers,” said Brad, noting the family business also included his grandfather Arthur, who was an important part of the team for many years. “Believe me, your florist knows everything — and we love being there for our clients’ every-things.”
When the store opened, the Weinsteins couldn’t get flowers from Europe; now, many are in the store 36 hours after they’ve been cut. From Israel, one of the top 10 floral exporters, the Weinsteins order the popular Gerbera Daisy.
Petals & Stems has weathered grocers, 800 numbers and the internet — all offering flower sales — finding new clientele by providing an online catalogue and partnering with the Teleflora network. Their Rolodex has morphed into email contacts, sharing specials and contests — during this anniversary month they gave away 45 bouquets.
“Service and family always come first,” said Dotty, a former teacher, recalling her children would be in the truck while the couple would clean up after celebrations. “Lew gave birth to the store and has devoted so much to the service part of the business. Local Jewish caterers took us under their wings and wanted to give him the business.”
The Weinsteins’ professional design team has decorated Metroplex homes, hotels and headquarters. During a 1995 Jewish Federation trip to Israel, with 400 Dallasites, Lew and Dotty couldn’t get over how many people recounted the occasions that Petals & Stems had serviced.
Keeping calendars for their clients, reminding them of birthdays and anniversaries, is a touch to success. Carol Gene Cohen made notes of calls she’s received before she had a chance to order. Brad says clients take care of them as well, with cookies and other treats showing up for the floral team on Valentine’s Day and other occasions. Dotty recalls many husbands who’ve called with “thanks for keeping me out of trouble,” also remembering Southwest Airlines bringing lunch to the store. “Imagine the customer buying us lunch,” she said.
Wanting to give back to the ever-grateful community, for almost 15 years the Weinsteins have donated 10 percent of $30 minimum sales, for deliveries, phone orders, simchas, and arrangements picked up at the shop to synagogues purchasers designate. They also hold floral decorating contests with prizes donated to charities chosen by winners.
“Brad keeps bringing new inspiration, vitality and spark to the business,” said Lew, proud that some in the next generation are stepping in to help out too. “He’s tripled our business and, like all of our kids, made us proud. To know that Petals & Stems is where it is, because our family has worked together, is very special to us.”
Never losing the personal Weinstein touch, either Brad or Lew, or both, are always at the store, located at 13319 Montfort Drive. To place an order, call 972-233-9037 or visit petalsandstems.com.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Guys Night Out involves plenty of reading

Guys Night Out involves plenty of reading

Posted on 06 July 2017 by admin

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

The Guys Night Out Book of the Month Club is celebrating its 15th anniversary this summer.
This summer’s programs will be on July 18, featuring Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet, and Aug. 15 (The Presidents Club: Inside the World’s Most Exclusive Fraternity). Both begin at 7 p.m. at the Aaron Family JCC, 7900 Northaven Road.
“We Jews are the people of the book and so it only makes sense that we be that — readers of books and people who discuss and learn from them and from each other,” said Bob Weinfeld, on why having a book club matters to him. It’s amazing that although Weinfeld never seems to sit long enough to read a sentence, let alone a novel, the Guys Night Out is truly one of his passions and something he always looks forward to.

Photo: Jean Weinfeld  Dr. Baer Ackerman, left, and Bob Weinfeld, are readying the July 18 edition of the Guys Night Out Book of the Month Club. Beginning at 7 p.m. July 18, Ackerman will lead the discussion about Jeffrey Rosen’s Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet.

Photo: Jean Weinfeld
Dr. Baer Ackerman, left, and Bob Weinfeld, are readying the July 18 edition of the Guys Night Out Book of the Month Club. Beginning at 7 p.m. July 18, Ackerman will lead the discussion about Jeffrey Rosen’s Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet.

While Weinfeld and his wife Jean were on vacation in Colorado, with Dallas friends Fred, of blessed memory, and Marlene Fisher, the wives were talking about a book club. Bob heard the idea and gave it a go. He recruited Fred, Jerry Levin and Ken Parker, and the foursome founded the group.
“The J is the central address for programs like this and it’s what we’re all about,” said Artie Allen, the J’s chief executive officer. “Bob is a living legend, the epitome of the fountain of youth, and (members of) this group — like him — are all a tribute to living life better than well. Reading certainly helps with the wellness of the mind. We wish the group many more anniversaries and we look forward to hosting the current and new members for many years.”
When the group first cracked a binding, it was Laura Hillenbrand’s Seabiscuit, and together they’ve read and reviewed 170 books, most of which are under 350 pages, and about 80 percent of which are nonfiction. This summer’s titles will be reviewed by book club members: in July, by Dr. Baer Ackerman, and at the August anniversary celebration, by Bob Behrendt.
Jeffrey Rosen’s Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet was published last summer to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the justice’s confirmation to the Supreme Court. The book explores Brandeis’ views and actions on the Constitution, corporate and federal power, technology, privacy, free speech, Zionism, and more. The Presidents Club: Inside the World’s Most Exclusive Fraternity, by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy, shares the history of the private relationships among the last 13 presidents — the partnerships, private deals, rescue missions, and rivalries of those select men who served as commander-in-chief.BOOK CLUB founders
The group, which began with eight men and which has grown to many times that, has more than 20 regulars who have participated almost since the beginning, and others who’ve joined over the years.
Despite its Guys Night Out title, the club is an open book, with women invited to attend many of the programs. While the Sept. 19 title is still to be announced, the rest of the 2017 calendar includes events on Oct. 17, with a discussion about Michael Bar-Zohar’s Mossad: The Greatest Missions of Israeli Secret Service; on Nov. 21, Homo-Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari; and the Dec. 19 meeting, featuring Larry Pivnick’s The Kilgore Curse and Supreme Corruption.
“The books are of great genre variety. Everyone has their own opinion and while one person might love it, the guy next to him might have given it a pass — but what’s always consistent is that we enjoy each other’s company and comments on the books,” said Weinfeld, who also founded the book club at The Legacy at Willow Bend as well as that facility’s library, now with thousands of rotating books. “Sometimes you learn something, or will change your mind about a book, just from listening to the rest of the gang. It’s a great group that comes together and we hope more want to join us — after all, the success of the Guys Night Out is an ‘open book.’ ”
Guys Night Out events are open to the public and free of charge, with each review and discussion preceded by a meet and greet with refreshments. For more information, email Bob Weinfeld at robert.weinfeld@tx.rr.com.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Lacrosse stars invited to try out for Team Israel

Lacrosse stars invited to try out for Team Israel

Posted on 06 July 2017 by admin

By Sean Shapiro
Special to the TJP

Graham Marcus thought he was getting spammed.
When he checked his email and there was invite to try out for the Israeli national lacrosse team, the Plano native was skeptical.
“I didn’t know anything about it; I really thought it was a fake email,” he said. “But I looked into it and it turned out to be legit. And now I’m really excited about it.”
A recently graduated senior from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, Marcus still isn’t sure how they got his name or how he ended up on the list of players invited to try out for Team Israel this summer.

Daniel Kravit played in nine games last season for Roanoke College. He scored three goals and assisted on two more.

Daniel Kravit played in nine games last season for Roanoke College. He scored three goals and assisted on two more.

“I have a theory, but don’t know exactly how they found out,” he said. “Someone must have done the hard work to find all the best players with Jewish heritage.”
He’ll be among a group of athletes that head to Israel on July 15, along with fellow Dallas native Daniel Kravit, and will be there until Aug. 11 trying to make the team for the 2018 World Lacrosse Championship in Israel.
Israel first competed in the 2014 World Lacrosse Championship, held in Denver, and finished seventh in the 38-team tournament.

Graham Marcus, shown at his senior day celebration at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, played 47 games and started 41 for the Warriors. According to the Hendrix College athletics website, Marcus — a defensive specialist — scored one goal, assisted on eight shots and ranked seventh in school history with 40 forced turnovers.

Graham Marcus, shown at his senior day celebration at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, played 47 games and started 41 for the Warriors. According to the Hendrix College athletics website, Marcus — a defensive specialist — scored one goal, assisted on eight shots and ranked seventh in school history with 40 forced turnovers.

“It’s a growing sport and I’ve never been to Israel,” Kravet said. “It’s exciting to see where lacrosse can take me. Never thought I’d be considered to play for the World Championships.”
Both Marcus and Kravit are eligible to try out for the teams as Americans with Jewish heritage. There will be a three-day formal tryout and then the players have been placed on teams in the Israeli Premier Lacrosse League, where there will be further evaluation. During that same time the teams will also be putting on youth clinics and getting involved in the community through various community service projects.
During that time, Israeli lacrosse officials will try to put together the best group of players, and there is hope the events surrounding the 2018 World Lacrosse Championship, including this tryout session, will help grow the game.
“Everywhere I’ve played lacrosse it’s been growing,” Marcus said. “Whether it was in high school or in college, and now this. It’s a great sport, and to be able to help promote it and introduce more people to the sport in awesome.”
Marcus and Kravit both grew up playing lacrosse in Plano. Their families were close and they eventually played on the same team in high school (Marcus is one year older). Both played college lacrosse, with Marcus finishing up a four-year career as the captain at Hendrix College, while Kravit will be a senior next season at Roanoke College in Virginia.
“I know Graham well, we would play together and our families are close,” Kravit said. “We were a year apart on youth teams, but in high school it was great to play together. Now it’s really cool to be able to try out for Team Israel with him.”
Marcus is a long-stick middie, a defensive specialist of sorts often charged with guarding the other team’s top player. Kravit is listed as a middie for the tryout, but has also played attack and is a more offensive-minded player on the field.
While the ultimate goal is to make the team, both Kravit and Graham said they plan on soaking up the whole experience in Israel.
“It’s going to be great,” Marcus said. “How often do you get to travel the world and play a sport you love?”
“It’s something I’m sure I’ll never forget,” Kravit said.
Both players also said they hope their experience can help grow the sport in Texas. Lacrosse is one of the fastest growing sports in the United States, and Marcus said letting younger players know about the opportunities — including playing in college and heading to Israel — show how the sport can open so many doors.
“On top of that it’s just fun,” Graham said. “In my mind it’s the best sport in the world.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Helping people find healthy harmony

Helping people find healthy harmony

Posted on 06 July 2017 by admin

Suzy Harmon has written Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, providing the busy person’s guide to harmonious health. Photo: Deb Silverthorn

Suzy Harmon has written Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, providing the busy person’s guide to harmonious health.
Photo: Deb Silverthorn

Harmon’s book provides clarity for ‘whys’ of health

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Dallas resident Suzy Harmon is taking a big bite out of life — a healthy bite — combining her talents and expertise as an Integrative Nutrition Health Coach and author of Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, with advice on how to live a harmonious life.
“I want to know the ‘whys’ of my clients: why do they want to lose weight, why do they want to be healthy, and why do they want to live,” said Harmon, a New York native who made Dallas home in 1996. A former accountant who traded in financial spreadsheets for cookie sheets with healthy treats, she is now making a healthy lifestyle one to enjoy.
“People want to be healthy. They just think it’s much more difficult, expensive, or time-consuming than it really is.”
The wife of Andy and mother of Bradley, Zach and Lindsay, Harmon spent more than two decades as a CPA. Looking back, she notes that she and those around her were more worried about their financial health than their personal health. When her father passed away in 2008, she gained weight, couldn’t sleep, had hair and skin issues and needed medicine to focus and sleep. An online search brought her to the Institute for Integrative Nutrition and, with a “click,” she signed on for a class and up for a life change. That move would enhance her world, that of those around her and for many she’d never met.
Harmon decided to make a difference — believing the dream of a career involving health, nutrition, and overall wellness was within her grasp. Becoming a Certified Integrative Nutrition Health Coach, Harmon created a curriculum that provides her clients guidance in the areas of positive nutrition, lifestyle, relationships, career goals, financial concern and reaching their fullest potential.
Believing and living the mantra “your greatest wealth is your health,” Harmonious Health support comes through in her book, blog, recipes, classes, grocery store tours, lunch and learn events, food demonstrations, and corporate training programs.
“I wrote the book to expand my audience and the response has been incredible,” said the first-time author. “I love the one-to-one working relationship I have with my clients but I also wanted to reach further.”
In Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, an easy read of 143 pages — chapters that are easy to pick up independently — Harmon breaks down the habits of healthy living into five categories related to home environment, eating, body care, cooking, and the mind. It isn’t about homing in on one area that brings success, but respect for caring for one’s total self.
Her website, SuzyHarmoniousHealth.com, teases taste buds with delicious recipes on her blog, guaranteed to ignite the healthy spirit. From Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Meat Sauce to Homemade All Natural Snack Bars, and Green Chile Chicken to Dessert Date Bars, Harmon provides the possibilities that make getting healthy easy, delicious, and a “want to,” rather than a “have to.”
The planning, shopping, and creating is part of the process — memory making she shared first in the kitchens of her mother and grandmother. “There’s nothing wrong with reaching for food for comfort, but there’s everything right in finding it through the act of creating the food, cooking it, and knowing what’s in it,” said Harmon. “Truly, we are fed by aroma, by a beautiful display of a meal, by the prayers that come from us in appreciation for what we have. You won’t find true comfort in a bag of chips — or in a second. My goal is to get more people to enjoy being in the kitchen, cooking real food and showing them how simple it is with a little planning.”
Her approach isn’t focused on just diet or exercise but on an overall education of wellness. “Many of us take the time to read the ingredients of the foods we buy, but how many take a look at what goes into our soaps and lotions, shampoos and other body products?” she said — noting that our skin is one of our largest organs, absorbing all that it’s exposed to.
“We need to know not just what we’re ingesting, but what we’re absorbing, through our skin into our bloodstream.”
In addition to her individual coaching sessions, Harmon has addressed high school students and seniors with the keys from her book and experience, talking to students about how to make healthy tasty choices in the dining hall and the dorm room, and reduce stress, while leaving the “freshman 15” on the table.
“I never expected to discuss many of the issues that come up during my health coaching sessions with clients, but in examining health and nutrition, many deep and personal issues surface that answer many of the questions about happy and fulfilling lives,” said Harmon.
“I’ve become passionate about how healthy living can add vibrancy to our lives. What feeds us, feeds our souls and it’s important to learn how to make the connection for success in our careers, relationships, and our purpose in life.”
For more information about Harmon’s programs or to register for classes, for recipes, or to order Hungry for Health, Starved for Time, visit SuzyHarmoniousHealth.com, email harmonioushealth@sbcglobal.net, or call 214-293-7768.

 

*****

Healthy living
Feeling great is as easy as finding the balance by:
Creating a sacred space in your home
Choosing foods that help you feel your best
Stress reduction and pampering
Cooking meals that taste great and curb cravings
Making time to unplug and relax

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (1)

Breaking ground in Midtown

Breaking ground in Midtown

Posted on 29 June 2017 by admin

_DSC1629

First phase underway for new 430-acre Dallas Midtown, which includes demolition of Valley View Mall

By James Russell
Special to the TJP

The much-anticipated Dallas Midtown development broke ground Friday, June 23, at a press event attended by its most enthusiastic backers.
The 430-acre development at the corner of Preston Road includes the site of the shuttered Valley View Mall. It has been in the making since 2009, when then-City Councilwoman Linda Koop brought together various stakeholders to create an urban village linked via existing roads, trails and a trolley system.
Koop is now a Republican state representative whose district no longer is confined solely to Dallas. She was among the enthusiastic officials at the event.
“This development will create a city within a city. With restaurants, shopping, housing and office space, Dallas Midtown will completely redefine this part of Dallas,” Koop said.
Those entertainment destinations include a 183,000-square-foot Life Time Fitness facility featuring residence, working spaces, large aquatic and workout studios. The residential component, called Life Time Living, is a new concept for the health and wellness company. When completed, the Life Time facility will be the brand’s largest in the country. The other anchor is a 10-screen Cinépolis movie theater. The chain is known for its high-quality reclining chairs, full-service bar and gourmet snacks.
Also announced were plans for more than 1,000 apartments, 400,000 square feet of retail, 500,000 square feet of office space and an 18-story luxury hotel. The hotel brand will be announced soon.
The development will ultimately surround Midtown Commons, a previously announced 20-acre park backers call the centerpiece of the development.
“Over 20 acres are being dedicated to create a place for the tens of thousands of people who will be living here as well as our broader community. The Commons will be a place to gather, play, dream, exercise, and learn,” said Jaynie Schultz, a member of the city’s planning commission. “Midtown Commons will be the place for residents north and south to easily and joyfully celebrate the blessing of living in Dallas.”

 Jaynie Schultz spoke at the Midtown groundbreaking. “If we pull together and our corporations and foundations rise to the moment, our children and grandchildren will see Midtown Commons as a second home,” she said.

Jaynie Schultz spoke at the Midtown groundbreaking. “If we pull together and our corporations and foundations rise to the moment, our children and grandchildren will see Midtown Commons as a second home,” she said.

At the groundbreaking was developer Scott Beck, CEO of Beck Ventures, who has been involved since 2012, when his company acquired the Valley View Mall site.
Like others in attendance, Beck noted the project is not just another north Dallas infill site. Dallas Midtown will compete with the city’s northern suburbs, like Frisco and Plano, which are increasingly attracting more corporate relocations.
“We will now have our answer to stop the flight from corporate America to the far outreaches of our northern and western suburbs,” Beck said during the ceremony. “For far too long, city politics have created an environment where instead of encouraging and demanding policy for strong northern and southern sectors of our city, we have enabled and allowed neighboring cities to take away valuable corporate clients from the tax base in Dallas.”
The development also benefits the southern part of the city too. Dallas Midtown is a designated tax-increment financing district, or TIF, a commonly used method for public financing community-improvement developments. The TIF funds a “desperately needed” redevelopment of Southwest Center Mall in South Dallas.
Beck previously told the TJP Midtown would bring billions of dollars of revenue to the region in the next 30 years. Of that, a significant portion will go toward redeveloping Southwest Center.
“Dallas Midtown will become a major economic driver for the city of Dallas. It will strengthen our tax base and help our city lure and retain corporate headquarters. This is an extremely desirable site and this is the perfect way to develop it,” said City Councilman Tennell Atkins, who represents Southwest Center.
The overall impact will not just be the 430-acre development. The entire region will benefit, too. That’s what makes it historic.
“Our family and the Beck Ventures family of companies are honored to be the stewards of Dallas’ most crucial transformational project this century,” Beck said in a statement.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (0)

Fort Worth kayak company’s anti-Semitic comment on Facebook sinks contract with city

Posted on 22 June 2017 by admin

By Rick Press
Special to TJP

A Fort Worth kayak company is up a creek without a paddle after posting anti-Semitic and racially inflammatory comments on its Facebook page.

“To all you broke-a** hateful know-it-all white women and Facebook trolls that think they are going to Jew us down … (You know who you are)… The (rental) price is set in stone so stop wasting your time. This is NOT Mexico.”

The Facebook post, which was an apparent response to complaints about a sizable fee increase, touched off a social media firestorm over the weekend. And on Wednesday the city of Fort Worth decided to terminate its contract with the company, which provided kayak rentals at the city-owned Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge.

“Thank you! These folks can take their bigotry and hate elsewhere,” said one of the many commenters praising the decision on the City Hall Facebook page. “Good. They are horribly unprofessional,” said another.

Lori Tenery, one of the owners of Fort Worth Kayak Adventures, apologized for the comments in an interview with NBC5. “We don’t mean any harm. We’re not racist. We’re not prejudiced in any way,” said Tenery, who runs the company with her husband and daughter. “We hope that you will find it in your hearts to forgive us.”

Tenery also told NBC5 that her husband is Jewish.

Fort Worth Kayak Adventures has since deleted its Facebook post, but a screenshot of it posted online shows the company attempted to explain why it had recently doubled its kayak rental fee at the Nature Center from $20 to $40. It cited new permits and a contract required by the Center, along with a $2 million dollar liability insurance policy on the kayaks and their Suburban used for the business.

In a statement last week, Fort Worth officials said Fort Worth Kayak Adventures did not work directly for the city but was allowed to provide rentals at the Nature Center in exchange for a percentage of revenues. On Wednesday, the city announced it was terminating its agreement with the company and provided the required 30-day written notice that its last day renting kayaks at any city-owned facility would be July 19.

Still, the controversy hasn’t completely died down. A post on a Fort Worth Kayak Adventures page late Wednesday defended the company’s owner: “The guy that had the kayaks for rent was not racist, but he did like being a smart a**, and most people don’t consider the phrase Jewed down as being racist. We only knew it as a phrase people used to explain getting stuff cheaper.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments (2)

View or Subscribe to the
Texas Jewish Post

Advertise Here

Photos from our Flickr stream

See all photos

Advertise Here