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‘Celebration of Survival’ exhibit lands in Dallas

Posted on 16 November 2017 by admin

Event runs through October 2018

By James Russell
Special to the TJP

In her latest exhibition to the National Center for Jewish Art inside the Museum of Biblical Art, Houston artist Barbara Hines does not deviate from her well-known colorful landscapes and portraits as seen in Mysteries, Signs and Wonders: The Art of Barbara Hines, the center’s inaugural exhibition in 2014.
Hines takes a complete risk with mixed results. The exhibition, A Celebration of Survival, is an interactive, educational exhibition featuring original paintings, photographs and mixed media loosely centered on 18 acrylic portraits of the Righteous of the Nations, the Gentiles who risked their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust.
The exhibition, which opened Friday, Nov. 2, and runs through October 2018, comes from the Holocaust Museum Houston. It was more than a year in the making; Hines’ goal was to integrate interactive and educational components with more traditional elements of an art exhibition.
“The museum curators told me a third of the audience was between 8 and 18. I wanted to make it interactive to get young people involved and make it three dimensions, interactional, with sculpture and not just painting. I didn’t want it to just be intellectual. I wanted to use technology and more than just use images,” Hines said.
The Museum of Biblical Art’s considerably larger space allowed her to expand some features, including the entrance into the exhibition. Guests enter into a dark, dimly lit hallway of overlapping life-sized silkscreen photographs of children imprisoned in concentration camps. Mirrors are also on both walls, forcing you to see the children at the front and back.
“You can’t be isolated. These are real people,” said Scott Peck, an art historian and curator of the Museum of Biblical Art.
“The whole gallery is an immersive experience she has designed. She wanted to focus on children. Even though I’m an adult, it softens me up,” said Peck.
“I wanted to create an ambience of walking among the ghosts, the memories of the children, with the dim lights and mirrors catching oneself and the children and intermingling with them. The idea was to set a mood, not just walk in and view paintings,” Hines said.
The exhibition is personal, too.
Hines’ father was a Holocaust survivor who escaped Germany with his family to Australia. She was raised Christian and had no knowledge of her Jewish faith until her father revealed his past before she moved to Germany for a teaching gig.
“He suffered so much as a result of his Jewish heritage that he wanted a fresh start,” Hines said.
She did not begin seriously studying and ultimately converting to Judaism until around 2002, after discovering her mother was also Jewish.
Her father’s revelation was so important, in fact, she includes a portrait of him in the exhibition alongside two heroes of the Holocaust: the famed late writer Elie Wiesel and Father Patrick Desbois, a French Catholic priest who identifies and memorializes the mass graves of Jews during the Holocaust.
The exhibition also features other interactive artwork by Hines, including a Mitzvah Tree. The tree and portraits appear across from a video about Holocaust deniers and anti-Semites questioning the validity of the mass genocide.
Even if her upcoming shows are decidedly different — including a set of Icelandic landscapes and her first performance art piece, Joseph on the Red Carpet — reminding people about the heroes of the Holocaust remains more than a temporary interest. She hopes the show will tour elsewhere to keep its message alive.
After walking through the show, the question remains, what is that message?
“I wanted to make it something positive and not just focus on the negative side of it. This way young people would be attracted and learn from things about their collective history and learn to accept others who behave and look differently. That way we could all move forward in being accepting of our differences and celebrating our oneness as human beings,” Hines said.

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JNF meet-and-greet focuses on changing organization’s image

JNF meet-and-greet focuses on changing organization’s image

Posted on 16 November 2017 by admin

(From left) Carly Bierman, Chantal Itzhakov, Ilene Bierman. Deborah Gaspar, JNF Reception Co-chair Fonda Arbetter and Marcel Solman

(From left) Carly Bierman, Chantal Itzhakov, Ilene Bierman. Deborah Gaspar, JNF Reception Co-chair Fonda Arbetter and Marcel Solman

By Aaron Greenberg
Special to the TJP

DALLAS — What’s your image of the Jewish National Fund? For most Jews, it’s the iconic blue box and raising money to plant trees in Israel.
“Most people think you put money in a tin can for trees, but it is so much more,” said Fonda Arbetter, a JNF supporter who helped host an informational gathering at the home of Fredell and Allan Shulkin on Nov. 2, the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration.
Founded in 1901, JNF played a key role in building the infrastructure and purchasing the land that would become Israel. Yet its North Texas presence has fallen off over the years, leaving mostly memories of blue boxes.
JNF’s local, regional and national leadership is trying to update its image, spread the message of the organization’s current goals and generate excitement and support in the Metroplex.
Current and potential supporters got a chance to meet with and hear from some of those leaders, as well as the Jerusalem Post’s Gil Hoffman. JNF Chief Development Officer Rick Krasnick and Southwest Senior Campaign Executive Chuck Caughey spoke, and Southwest Executive Director Reagan E. Weil was also on hand.
“It is evident this community wants JNF to be active here,” Krasnick said afterward. “At last night’s event, the age of the people spanned from early 40s to 80, and our message of JNF being a big tent for the Jewish people resonated with them.”
Hoffman, the featured speaker, is the chief political correspondent for the Post. While he talked more broadly about Israel and his experiences, he touched on some of the key problems JNF is working to address.
“JNF is Israel beyond the conflict, what’s beautiful about Israel, and that’s why I like speaking for it,” he said. “It highlights the consensus we can be proud of.”
He told a story about how his son wanted to see the country’s biggest playground. It’s an indoor playground — because of rocket fire across the Gaza border — built by JNF in Sderot.
And that’s the part of the country people need to focus on, he said.
“The key to Israel’s future is settling the Negev,” Hoffman said. “If we don’t settle the Negev, we’re in trouble.
“People think that Israel is successful now, but they don’t realize the gap between the haves and have-nots is one of the widest in the world. Those have-nots require immediate assistance.”
The cost of living in the center — the economic hub of the land — is rising fast. Real estate prices in Tel Aviv have surpassed Manhattan, Krasnick said.
As a result, JNF has focused on the Negev and Galilee. Krasnick said this is a chance for younger Jews, who might think the work of building Israel is done, to get involved.
“We have raised more than $461 million from 400,000 donors in just the last four years,” Krasnick said. “Those dollars are supporting our vision to build the Negev and Galilee so all of Israel’s citizens can have the best quality of life for the next 70 years.
“We must create the conditions to support 500,000 Israelis moving to the Negev and 300,000 Israelis to the Galilee. This is the only solution to help the economic climate where the average Israeli, who is tethered to the expensive center, can find a better quality of life to support their families.”
Krasnick mentioned projects like the building of health care facilities and homes for farmers along agricultural corridors, such as the border with Jordan. Many young people have left these communities that provide most of the nation’s exports, but now they are interested in coming back. JNF has increased the housing stock by 30 percent.
JNF’s seven areas of work include community building, water solutions, disabilities and special needs, research and development, education and advocacy, forestry and green innovations, and heritage site preservations.
Arbetter said she saw these in action throughout the land. Although she had gone to Israel three times before, she saw the relationship between the nation and JNF in a new way.
“Jay (her husband) and I took a private tour two years ago, but we saw things with JNF we never could with a private guide. You have to do both to get a good overview,” she said.
“We got to see actual projects that JNF was in charge of. If you are with JNF, Israelis treat you like royalty.”
Arbetter became involved after meeting Alyse Golden Berkley, president of the board for the Los Angeles area, at a wedding.
“She told me what she and her family did in Israel, and I thought that was very cool,” Arbetter said.
When she went on a JNF mission to Israel this year, there were Jews from across the U.S., but she was the only one from Texas. She’s hoping to help spread the message enough so that things change.
Arbetter said Dallas is very involved with AIPAC, Jewish Family Service and the Federation, and she’d like to see the local community embrace JNF the same way.
“What I experienced in Israel, I wanted to share with my friends and acquaintances in Dallas,” she said.
Caughey has been working over the past year to build up interest in the region. He said he sees an opportunity, and cited the organization’s complete focus on Israel, and how 86 cents on every dollar goes directly to the cause.
About 100 people attended, and had a chance to hear about JNF’s work from Arbetter, in addition to the professional speakers.
Krasnick said the format, where people hear speakers and mingle, has given JNF a chance to really tell its story.
He also mentioned that there are programs for high school and college students who want to get involved, as well as those for young professionals.
“JNF is here for the long haul, and we have a long-term vision to connect our friends in the Dallas area to Israel as lifelong partners of the land and people of Israel through Jewish National Fund,” he said.

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JFS provides food for homebound citizens

JFS provides food for homebound citizens

Posted on 16 November 2017 by admin

By Deb Silverthorn
Special to the TJP

Three meals a day seems like the norm for most, but — for those who are homebound — not so much.
That’s where Jewish Family Service’s Kosher Home Delivered Meals program comes in. For more than 40 years, the program has made meals happen for those who can’t make them happen for themselves.
“This program is absolutely the lifeline to staying home and independent and that’s something we wish for everyone,” said JFS’ Director of Older Adult Services Debi Weiner. “Hunger is something no one should know and our meals are among a wide spectrum of services to help older adults remain independent in their communities for as long as they can function safely and effectively.”
Healthy meals include an entrée of beef, chicken or fish; a vegetable; bread; dessert; and calcium-fortified orange juice. Meals are prepared by the staff in the kosher kitchen at the Aaron Family JCC; volunteers circle every aspect of the program.

Lynne Baron has made deliveries with her husband Marty for JFS’ Kosher Home Delivered Meals program most Fridays over the last 10 years. “The people we deliver to are so appreciative and thankful,” she said, “and we know we’re making a difference every time we go out.”

Lynne Baron has made deliveries with her husband Marty for JFS’ Kosher Home Delivered Meals program most Fridays over the last 10 years. “The people we deliver to are so appreciative and thankful,” she said, “and we know we’re making a difference every time we go out.”

“As the holidays approach, the visits and the smiles that go with the meals are so important to our recipients and it really makes all the difference in the world to them,” said DeeDee Lane, who coordinates the program in action. It currently serves 35 active recipients, matching volunteers’ available schedules to the need each day. “We’ve had volunteers that are parent/child teams with little ones helping to carry the load, literally. We have teens and adults and grandparents. Vacation schedules get tougher because people go away but we’d love anyone who wants to help — one-time, sometimes or regularly. This program really does rely on the people who help us get the food out.”
Meals are delivered Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays (in advance if a holiday lands on one of those days so there is no interruption in service) to anyone who qualifies under the grant and while all meals are kosher, recipients do not have to be Jewish to participate. Meals are delivered to recipients within JFS’ service area bordered between Mockingbird Lane and McCallum and Greenville, also in most of the City of Richardson (within Dallas County) and the Silver Gardens Senior Apartments (formerly the Echad Apartments). The western boundary is Webb Chapel.
For 18 years, the Dallas Area Agency on Aging has provided grants to sustain the program. In recent years, it has been supported by the Texas Department of Agriculture and Dallas County as well.. Up to seven meals a week are available, the need determined at an assessment by a JFS counselor. For those not meeting the economic constraints, delivered meals are available at $5.75 each. Recipients may be on the schedule long-term or temporarily, or perhaps while recovering from an illness or injury.
“For many, delivering meals is the first introduction to JFS and the relationships are often long lasting,” said Weiner, speaking from experience. She was a driver for the program before becoming a JFS professional. “Our helpers are all ages and from all areas of the community and we thrive because of their commitment.”
Volunteers confirm the number of meals they have matches the number of recipients on their route and set off to perform their mitzvah. For many, the delivery person is the only contact some recipients have. Client confidentiality is primary, but the relationships built between many volunteers and their recipients are treasured.
For 17-year-old Evan Allen, volunteering has been a life-altering experience. “Everyone deserves respect even if they’ve fallen on hard times or are dealing with medical constraints,” said the Plano ISD Academy High School senior, who has volunteered for many of JFS’ programs over the last seven years. “The ancient texts I read from the Torah during my bar mitzvah, although I couldn’t appreciate at the time, describe human beings as created b’tzelem Elokim, in the image of God. Connecting to the recipients has made those words much more personal, and given me a responsibility to serve.”

JFS MEALS volunteers & staff

Volunteers Nora Silverfield and Sam Friedman and JFS’ Kosher Home Delivered Meals Coordinator DeeDee Lane prep some of the more than 175 meals shared each week by JFS’ Kosher Home Delivered Meals program. Photo: JFS

While Allen volunteers as his schedule allows, Lynne and Marty Baron have made deliveries a standing date each Friday for the last 10 years. “JFS is phenomenal and we’ve been a part of many of its programs but delivering meals is something we love to do together. The people we deliver to are so appreciative and thankful and we know we’re making a difference every time we go out,” Lynne said.
“We’ve lost many whom we delivered to through the years and that’s very sad, of course,” said Lynne, “but we have one client we’ve served most of our tenure. Her husband sadly passed, they’d been married more than 60 years, but we still see her, check on her and deliver to her. She’s always glad to see us — of course that’s mutual.”
Feeding those who are hungry; nourishing their bodies and spirit — it’s what JFS does every day, in every way.
To volunteer for JFS’ Home Delivered Meals program, contact Jamie Denison at 972-994-0502 or email jdenison@jfsdallas.org. To arrange an assessment, as a prospective recipient, call JFS at 972-437-9950, for an initial intake appointment.

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Motivation second nature for award winner

Motivation second nature for award winner

Posted on 16 November 2017 by admin

Greenspan earns Tobian community service accolade

By Aaron Greenberg
Special to the TJP

DALLAS — When he arrived in town 28 years ago, Alan N. Greenspan set out in the most methodical way to become a part of the local Jewish community.
“I somehow got a hold of the Texas Jewish Post. They had an issue that listed every Jewish organization in Dallas, and gave a phone number and a contact person,” Greenspan said. “These were the days when you couldn’t email people, so I called every organization on the list and asked them to put me on their mailing list.”
He attended everything he could, and eventually became president of the local chapter of the American Jewish Committee, chair of the Jewish Community Relations Council, and a regular contributor to AIPAC and other groups.

Greenspan

Greenspan

On Monday, Nov. 27, Greenspan will be honored with the Milton I. Tobian Community Relations Award from AJC Dallas at the Westin Dallas Park Central. The award honors those who work to improve human relations, reflect their heritage and dedicate themselves to the community.
Greenspan downplayed the idea that he deserved the award, but is thrilled to help promote AJC.
“I’m grateful for the opportunity to help fundraise for the organization that has been so important to me and my life,” he said.
Gary Eisenstat, a former AJC president and co-chair of the dinner, wasn’t part of the selection committee, but said he figured Greenspan was selected for his continual work rather than any specific accomplishment.
“You see him pop up all the time in various settings, whether at synagogue or JCRC or AJC,” Eisenstat said. “You just see his name pop up all the time because he’s a doer and a giver. I think it’s the overall picture. It’s the consistency of his activities and his dedication throughout the years. He’s not just a flash in the pan.”
The award has been granted to individuals, couples or groups 40 times from 1970 to 2016.
“We don’t give an award just to give an award,” said Joel Schwitzer, AJC Dallas’ regional director. “We want to make sure that if we present that we’re recognizing someone whose values and actions reflect AJC’s values. It’s his whole body of work and his ongoing engagement with AJC.”
The event begins with a reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner and the program at 7. The Westin is located at 12720 Merit Drive. Registration closes Nov. 20, and RSVPs can be filled out at AJC.org/tobian. The co-chairs are Eisenstat and Brian Lidji. President Margot Carter will present Greenspan with the award.
Schwitzer said Greenspan is “someone very passionate about his role as a Jewish leader who carefully selects what to be involved in to make sure that position reflects his values, and we’re thrilled he chose AJC.”
Eisenstat said AJC has become known as the “Jewish department of state” in recent years for its expanded international work. It advances the cause of Israel and combats anti-Semitism in a number of ways.
One key is coalition building, an area in which Greenspan has made a name for himself.
Greenspan came to Dallas in 1989 to work for the law firm of Jackson Walker, LLP, where he stayed for 20 years before becoming first general counsel for Glazer’s Distributors. In 2016, Glazer’s merged with Southern Wine & Spirits to become Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits, the largest wholesaler in North America. He is now the general counsel for Southern Glazer’s.
Along the way he has been involved with many groups, and AJC holds a special place in his heart.
“I really liked the approach of AJC because it was consistent with my outlook on the world,” Greenspan said, citing the work on human rights and outreach.
“One of the things I’m very proud of is being the first person in Dallas to participate in a yearlong program with AJC called the Sholom D. Comay Fellowship,” he said.
The program allows young people to participate in the organization’s highest levels. He also was involved with the Hilda Katz Blaustein Leadership Institute, which allowed him to meet other chapters’ leaders and future leaders.
Through AJC, he worked with Muslim day schools in the area to improve the portrayal of Jews and Israel in textbooks. While chair of the Jewish Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, he oversaw an initiative to study Texas public school books out of similar concerns.
“What I’ve tried to do is to build bridges within the community and with other communities, and I think that’s the hallmark of the American Jewish Committee as well,” Greenspan said.
He has spent a good amount of time working with Latino, Christian and Muslim groups, among others.
“I think regardless of a person’s political views or priorities, we can always find common ground,” Greenspan said.
He has been married to Terri Train Greenspan for 25 years, and they have three children, Adam, Sara and Jennifer. Greenspan credits his wife for giving him a chance to blossom as a leader in the Jewish community. He also said the companies he’s worked for have been incredibly supportive.
Greenspan cited Richard Albert, who was AJC president before him, as being one of his mentors.
“The unique thing about my friendship with Richard is that when I became president of AJC, they used the phrase l’dor v’dor, from generation to generation,” he said. “Richard was 80 when he turned over the reins to me, and I was 40.”
He also mentioned Larry Ginsburg, who has been an AJC president, JCRC chair and president of Temple Emanu-El — and also a Milton Tobian honoree.
Of course, other leaders have plenty of things to say about Greenspan.
“Alan’s a very thoughtful person,” Eisenstat said. “He’s not going to be the guy who will stand up and wave his arms around and be ‘look at me, look at me.’ He talks by doing.”

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Dallas attorney stands up to BDS on Al Jazeera

Posted on 16 November 2017 by admin

By Sharon Wisch-Ray
sharon@tjpnews.com

Dallas attorney Charles Pulman, Israel advocate and founder of Why Israel Matters, completed a panel of four on Al Jazeera on Tuesday to debate Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions.
Joining Pulman on the pro-Israel, anti-BDS side was Mark Levenson, chairman of the New Jersey-Israel Commission. The pro-BDS side was represented by Dima Khalidi, director of Palestine Legal and Josh Ruebner, policy director of the U.S. Campaign for Palestinian Rights.
This was a first for Pulman, a longtime Israel advocate who has spoken in many settings. He was contacted Thursday by Al Jazeera after they read an online story about Pulman’s appearance in St. Louis earlier this month, posted by the St. Louis Jewish Light.
Pulman and Levenson submitted a fact-driven approach to the anti-BDS case.
“The BDS movement’s goal is to delegitimize Israel and to eradicate the one Jewish state in the entire world,” Levenson said.
Dima Khalidi asserted that BDS is a growing, grassroots human rights movement that frightens Israel.
“This is a nonviolent way of making collective change,” she said.
Khalidi likened the BDS movement to other civil rights movements of the past such as the anti-apartheid movement of the ’80s and the Montgomery bus boycott.
Levenson and Pulman were quick to disagree, pointing out that there are numerous human rights violations in other countries, including Turkey, Iran, and Sudan; however, the BDS movement focuses only on Israel.
“Palestinians in Israel have levels of educational attainment, literacy, medical care and per capita income that really exceed those of every other Arab country,” Levenson said.
Pulman added, “Why don’t we go back and talk about what the real aim of BDS is. If you look at what the BDS campaign has published and its three aims, the first one is to end what it calls the colonization of all Arab lands. It doesn’t say the West Bank. It doesn’t say Gaza. It doesn’t say the Golan Heights. All Arab lands, because the Palestinian leadership considers all of Israel to be Arab lands.
“If you really drill down into what the BDS campaign is about, It’s about ending Israel as a Jewish state. And about denying the Jewish people their own sovereignty.”
Pulman explained that he has heard the founder of SJP (Students for Justice in Palestine) speak in Dallas and he said that he’s not in favor of two states. He’s only in favor of one state.
“What BDS unfortunately doesn’t seek is to improve the lives of the Palestinians and to seek peace between the Israelis and Palestinians so there can be lasting peace and justice and equality for both people in that region of the world.”
Show host Femi Oke shifted the conversation to recent legislative discussions surrounding BDS.
The American Civil Liberties Union has alleged that anti- BDS legislation seeks to oppress people’s right to free speech. It is challenging anti-BDS legislation on First Amendment grounds.
Ruebner called anti-BDS legislation “the most draconian legislation on any issue ever introduced in Congress.”
Ruebner said the anti-BDS legislation is “in response to the list the U.N. will be putting out next month of Israeli companies doing business in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and global corporations that are complicit in support of those settlements.”
Levenson explained that the legislation is “prohibiting economic conduct; there is no prohibition on free speech. Any business can hate Israel, any business can hate whomever they want. What they can’t do is, they can’t discriminate in the conduct of their business.”
Pulman explained that the federal bill that’s pending is an extension of the Export Administration Act of 1979.
“The Anti-Israel Boycott Act will extend the existing law to boycotts called for by international organizations including the U.N. and the European Union. That’s all it does,” Pulman said. “It isn’t a new law, it’s an extension of an existing law because of the anti-Semitic enabling resolutions that are being passed by the U.N. condemning Israel for everything under the sun.”
Ruebner believes that the fact that there are Jewish people who live in Israel is immaterial.
“BDS is nothing more than a global response to oppression,” he said.
As the show wrapped up, Pulman clarified Texas’ recent legislation.
“Texas (legislation) says that if you engage in discriminatory business conduct with regard to Israel, then the State of Texas is not obligated to do business with you … Texas legislation does not ban BDS, doesn’t ban hate speech and doesn’t ban boycotts. People are free to engage in that. In fact, Palestine Legal’s website even acknowledges that they can continue to boycott. All it (the law) says is the State of Texas has no obligation to support a business that is engaging in blatant discriminatory, anti-Semitic acts toward an ally of the United States that is consistent with Federal law.”
After the show, Pulman told the TJP that he was glad that Al Jazeera brought the topic to light. He believes that the show’s co-hosts Oke and Malika Bilal were mostly fair.
“I enjoyed it,” he said.

 

 

*****

 

View video online: http://stream.aljazeera.com/story/201711140214-0025544

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Jews around world offer condolences after Texas shooting

Posted on 09 November 2017 by admin

JTA

JERUSALEM — Israeli leaders sent messages of support to the United States in the wake of a Texas church shooting that left at least 26 people dead.
“Horrified by the savagery in Texas,” Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said in a statement that his office also tweeted. “Our hearts are with the victims, their families and the American people.”
President Reuven Rivlin, on an official visit to Spain, also tweeted his concern.
“Terrible news coming out of #Texas. Our thoughts and prayers are with all the victims and their families,” he wrote.
Several local Jewish congregations responded, including Shearith Israel.
“The act of mass murder in a house of God is a particularly heinous and unspeakable crime,” the synagogue’s press release stated. “We pray that the families who mourn the loss of loved ones will find comfort and consolation. We pray that God will send healing to all those who have been injured.”
The Rabbinical Council of America responded, as well.
“The murder of every human being, each created in the divine image, is the ultimate tragedy,” said Rabbi Elazar Muskin, president of the RCA. “This tragedy is compounded by the violation and desecration of a house of worship.”
A gunman opened fire Sunday morning at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, southeast of San Antonio. The congregation had just begun its service.
The gunman has been identified as Devin Kelley, 26, from New Braunfels. Kelley reportedly served in the Air Force, but was court-martialed in 2012 for assaulting his wife and child, and received a dishonorable discharge in 2014 for “bad conduct.” The Air Force admitted it failed to pass along that ruling to the FBI. Those documents would have prevented him from purchasing any firearm, including at least one used in the attack.
Kelley was found dead in his car some miles from the church after a car chase. At least 20 others were wounded.

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IDF soldiers speak to Dallas-area students

IDF soldiers speak to Dallas-area students

Posted on 09 November 2017 by admin

Submitted report

StandWithUs (SWU) ninth “Israeli Soldiers Tour” brought Israel Defense Forces (IDF) reservists Kayla and Itamar to Dallas on Oct. 27 through 29, where they shared their experiences with hundreds of students and community members.
They spoke at Yavneh Academy, BBYO, UT Dallas, Congregation Beth Torah and Temple Emanu-El. StandWithUs Texas board members Ken Glaser and Anita Weinstein and the Southwest Jewish Congress, along with Temple Shalom Brotherhood and Temple Shalom’s Israel Connection Council, sponsored a talk at Temple Shalom, attended by board members Janine and Charles Pulman.
Noga Even and Eli Minsky, the StandWithUs high school interns, brought them to Yavneh Academy. Eli’s grandfather Frank Risch is a board member and his brother Aaron was the SWU high school intern in 2014-15. They were accompanied by Jesse Stock, SWU Texas associate director.
Six teams of two traverse the U.S. as part of SWU’s “Israeli Soldiers Tour” (IST). These reservists relate their personal experiences upholding the strict IDF moral code while fighting an enemy that hides behind its civilians. Their stories have never been heard before.

Submitted photo (From left) Susie Salfield Avnery, Itamar, StandWithUs Regional Director Jesse Stock and Charles Pulman pose for a photo during the ninth Israeli Soldiers Tour.

Submitted photo
(From left) Susie Salfield Avnery, StandWithUs Regional Director Jesse Stock, Itamar and Charles Pulman pose for a photo during the ninth Israeli Soldiers Tour.

They also discuss their backgrounds and life in Israel, and answer questions. Kayla and Itamar put a “human face” on the IDF uniform. Last names are withheld for security reasons.
IST was initiated by reservists who were incensed at the lies promulgated about the IDF and wanted to set the record straight. Kayla and Itamar concur that they are grateful to have the opportunity to share their stories and expressed how important the love and support they receive is for their morale.
Kayla 22, lived in the United States until the end of high school. She participated in multiple Jewish youth organizations, which allowed her to visit Israel for the first time when she was 15.
After graduation, Kayla volunteered with the IDF as a lone soldier. She served in a coed combat unit that specializes in search and rescue. She was stationed in the Gaza Envelope and throughout the West Bank. She served in 2014, during Israel’s war against Hamas’ terror tunnels in Gaza. She shudders at having only four seconds to take cover from the barrage of Hamas rockets, never knowing when-if a terrorist will emerge from under them and the stress of living for weeks in bomb shelters, feeling helpless.
Kayla now studies government and counterterrorism at IDC in Herzliya, Israel.
Itamar 25, is from Pardess Hana-Karkur, in Northern Israel. He now lives at Kibbutz Magal and studies education and political science at Oranim College.
Itamar served in the intelligence forces of the IDF in a classified unit dealing with the complicated encounters between soldiers and Palestinian civilians.
He survived two attacks. When he was 10 years old, a car bomb made by Islamic jihadists from the West Bank was detonated near a bus near his home. It murdered 14 and injured 50, including children. The second was on a date at a restaurant in Caesarea. Two rocket attacks forced them to duck for cover, helpless under the threat.
Despite dealing with an enemy that does not care about putting its civilians in harm’s way, Itamar and Kayla long for a better future. The car bomb inspired Itamar’s community to build a school for both Arab and Jewish students. Kayla explains that even during the Operation, Israel continued transporting supplies to Gaza residents and took care of the wounded.
In Israel, Jews and Arabs live in the same cities and regions. Both reservists educate that in a democracy such as Israel, different cultures can be preserved and encouraged to thrive. Both hope that they will be met with a partner on the other side that will prepare its people for peace and not terrorism so that the conflict can finally end.

 

 

SWU names area interns

Submitted report

Noga Even and Eli Minsky from Yavneh Academy and Alexandria Lewis from Bishop Lynch High School are the 2017-18 StandWithUs (SWU) high school interns.
Created in 2012, this is the only yearlong program of its kind in North America. One goal is to prepare students for challenges they may face regarding anti-Israel movements in college and in their communities. During the academic year, interns create Israel clubs in their schools, bring speakers, write op-eds, plan programs, and educate their peers and the community about Israel.
They attend training conferences in August and January, and by the end of the school year are equipped with the tools and education necessary to stand up for Israel when they take their first steps onto campus.SidebarJesse and The Dallas HS Interns
Eliav Terk is the SWU Emerson Fellow from UT Austin. Founded in 2001, the Fellowship selects and trains student leaders from universities across North America to educate their peers about Israel and combat anti-Israel rhetoric.
Tatiana Uklist, who was the 2015-16 StandWithUs (SWU) Emerson Fellow from University of Houston, is now SWU Texas high school liaison. Jen Weintraub, who was an Emerson Fellow at Manhattanville College, then SWU campus liaison in NY, was promoted to Southeast campus coordinator.
Noga and Eli participated in the drive to help Houston victims of the hurricane. They also brought SWU’s “Israeli Soldiers Tour” to their school. Kayla and Itamar addressed the entire school assembly. Alexandria interviewed with Christian news site OneNewNow on the necessity of educating about Israel, especially at her school, where students have spread misinformation about the Jewish state. Eliav also brought the reservists to UT Hillel and to AEPi.

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Shark Tank star headlines Yes! Event

Posted on 09 November 2017 by admin

Real-estate mogul, self-made millionaire Corcoran guest speaker at Legacy Senior Communities annual event

Submitted report

The Legacy Senior Communities hosted its Yes! Event fundraiser and welcomed reality television star, real estate mogul and self-made millionaire Barbara Corcoran as the guest speaker. Corcoran became one of the most successful entrepreneurs in the country after borrowing $1,000, quitting her job as a waitress and starting a tiny real estate company in New York City. That company grew into a $6 billion dollar real estate business. Today, best known as one of the “Sharks” on ABC’s hit TV show Shark Tank, Corcoran uses her finance and business acumen to invest in start-up companies and guide them to success.
Proceeds from this year’s event benefit The Legacy Senior Communities Financial Assistance Fund, which will provide charitable support to future residents of The Legacy Midtown Park to help supplement the cost of their care and enrich their quality of life. In addition, the fund assists seniors using personal assistance services (which include help with bathing, grooming, dressing, transportation, recovering from illness and transitioning from a hospital stay back home) through The Legacy at Home. The Legacy Senior Communities has provided care to seniors and their families in the Greater Dallas area for more than 60 years. The event committee consisted of Co-chairs Carol Aaron, Dawn Aaron, Sandy Donsky, Linda Garner, Zona Pidgeon, Jody Stein and Karla Steinberg.
“We are a mission-driven organization dedicated to making sure Jewish seniors in Dallas have the care they need and the lifestyle they deserve,” said Melissa Orth, president and CEO of The Legacy Senior Communities. “We are excited about serving seniors in the future at The Legacy Midtown Park, our rental continuing care retirement community under development in Dallas. The generosity of our donors will help us provide charitable care to future residents of our vibrant and state-of-the-art community.”
Marc R. Stanley, chair of the board of trustees of The Legacy Senior Communities, added, “We are committed to developing incredible communities where seniors lead full and dynamic lives and to provide the highest quality of care and services through The Legacy at Home, our Medicare-certified home health agency,” said “We rely on our donors to help us accomplish our mission, and I want to personally thank everyone who has supported us and continues to support us each day.”
This year’s Carmen Miller Michael Award award was presented to Adlene Harrison, the first Jewish and first female mayor of Dallas. It was the third time, The Legacy Senior Communities has presented the award which pays tribute to Carmen Miller Michael, who was dedicated to improving the quality of life for people dealing with the issues of aging, mental health and cognitive challenges. The award was created to pay tribute to a member of the Greater Dallas community who displays the special qualities that Carmen Miller Michael possessed: a pioneering spirit and an unshakeable sense of justice and compassion. Harrison was chosen because she is a fiercely independent individual whose perseverance and dedication to others continues to inspire those around her. Harrison has been an integral component of The Legacy Senior Communities since she became a part of the Friends of Golden Acres auxiliary board, which was responsible for raising money and providing special programs during the 1960s.
“We were thrilled to honor Adlene at our event, and she is a true example of a pioneering spirit,” said Andrea Statman, director of development for The Legacy Senior Communities. “Our organization is focused on positively impacting the lives of seniors, and we are grateful for the longstanding generosity shown by individuals, foundations and businesses in our community. The fundraising efforts from this year’s event will help us extend our services to even more seniors, and we are committed to providing excellence to those we assist.”

 

Legacy sponsors:

Developer $15,000: Carol & Steve Aaron
Broker $10,000: Dawn & Todd Aaron/Tracy & Clay Aaron/Nicole Blue/Angela Aaron Horowitz/Erica & Craig Robins; D2 Architecture; Leo & Rhea Fay Fruhman Foundation; Mr. & Mrs. Harlan Korenvaes; Marsh & McLennan Agency – Kevin and Mahra Pailet/Dan and Stephanie Prescott/Stuart and Myra Prescott/Travis and Mitzi Sartain; Karla & Larry Steinberg; Gilian Baron/Susie Carp/Marion Glazer/Cathy Glick/Lisa Goldberg/Beth Konig/Lisa Lieberman/Elaine Pearlman/Lisa Rudner/Lisa Zale
Agent $5,000: Sandy & Howard Donsky; Linda & David Garner; IMA | Waldman; Beverly & Cary Rossel; Marilyn Rothstein; Wendy and Marc Stanley; David Weinreb; Bonnie & Jeffrey Whitman
Buyer $2,500: Dean Maddelena/StudioSix5; Irma Grossman/Lois Wolf; Raelaine & Paul Radnitz; Kahn Mechanical Contractors; Phyllis & Joe Somer; Sharon Levin; Barbara Stein; Texas Jewish Post; Susan & Steven Wilkofsky
Underwriter $1,000: Lisa Albert/ Tricia Gold, M.B. & Edna Zale Foundation; Jim Beaman/Southwest Bank Mortgage; Frankie & Jerry Michaelson; Janet Beck; Carol & Stuart Morse; BERNBAUM/MAGADINI Architects; Melissa Orth; Candy Brown; Ruthie & Jay Pack; Francis & Julius Coleman; Laurie & Todd Platt; Fran & David Eisenberg; Helaine & Gerald Ray; Michael & Linda Ellentuck; Helen & Frank Risch; Marilyn Fiedelman: Ruthy & Steven Rosenberg; Julie Ray Fields; The Rubin Family Foundation/Julie & Jay Liberman; Dena Klein Frankfurt; Mr. and Mrs. Howard Schultz; Friedman & Feiger, LLP, Laurie Ginsberg/Stephanie Ross, Debbie & Eric Green; Rita Sue & Alan Gold; HBR Technologies/ The Romick Families; Ynette & Jim Hogue, Judy Perl Worldwide Travel; Mindi & Michael Kahn; Carol & Mark Kreditor; Ruth Levy; Liz & Robert Liener; Rhonda & Fraser Marcus; Bobbi Massman/Roz Goldstein; Helene Shalom; Ruthie and Alan Shor; Renee Stanley; Star Companies/The Pidgeon Family; Rhona Streit; The Belaire Group; Iris & Dennis Topletz; Maddy & Mark Unterberg; VITAS Healthcare; Janice Sweet Weinberg; Andrea Weinstein; Gerardo & Helga Weinstein; Donna Arp Weitzman/Dot Haymann; Ethel Zale

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Meet J’s new baby coordinator/mentor

Meet J’s new baby coordinator/mentor

Posted on 09 November 2017 by admin

Staff report

Last week the J launched its newest set of programs, J Baby. The classes include, among others, Newborn 101, Sleep Tight, Steam Babies, Music Makers, Stroller Exercise and Parent and Baby Yoga. Some gatherings will be social while others will be experiential or educational. Registration and class descriptions can be found at http://www.jccdallas.org/earlychildhoodcenter/j-baby/.
The TJP caught up with J Baby Coordinator and Mentor Teacher Dave Stanton to learn a little bit more about the innovative program. Rounding out the multidisciplinary staff are J Early Childhood Director Tara Ohayon and J Baylor Scott & White Health Wellness coordinator Brett Unell
TJP: What is J Baby?
DS: More than any educational or mindfulness tidbits (of which our speakers can dole out plenty) and more than any learning moments your child may experience in any class, our J Baby programming is designed to create a positive space that facilitates parents creating impactful moments. Whether it is through meeting other parents and shedding the feeling of isolation, or bonding with your baby in new and different ways, or having something to look forward to twice a month at our Babies and Bagels speaker series, we are becoming a little corner of Dallas where parents can be their cranky, over-caffeinated, in awe of their child, sleep-deprived, loving, coffee-stained selves.
TJP: How did you come up with the idea for J Baby?
DS: I sat down with Tara Ohayon, our Early Childhood Education director, and Brett Unell, our Baylor Scott & White Health Wellness coordinator, this summer to talk about ways to make the J a destination for more people. My focus immediately turned to finding a way to make parents of babies and toddlers feel welcome, able to connect with other parents and bond over the shared experiences of parenting. In a day and age when so many people follow careers far away from families, the built-in support network of parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and even friends don’t necessarily follow.
TJP: Tell us a little bit about yourself

Submitted photo David Stanton, his wife Dr. Stephanie Langin-Hooper and their son Myer Stanton

Submitted photo
David Stanton, his wife Dr. Stephanie Langin-Hooper and their son Myer Stanton

DS: I’ve been working with children in the field of summer camps and education for almost two decades now, with every age from infants up through high school. So there was no doubt in my mind that I was adequately prepared — as prepared as one could be — to become a new father. And as somebody who has survived the (almost) first two years of fatherhood, I can say that while my background running a lab preschool and working as a Mentor Teacher at the J was incredibly helpful, it did not necessarily make the responsibility any easier for me or my wife.
When my wife and I relocated to Dallas several years ago, we did not have much of a support network. And for the most part, that was completely fine pre-parenthood. It had been a similar experience during three years in Ohio and we were used to transitioning lives in new cities. But something was different when our son was born. There were some days that were deemed a success if we got a shower before five o’clock in the evening. Dishes piled up in the sink. I’m pretty sure there was one day I wore a shirt covered in spit up from morning digestive pyrotechnics without even realizing it. And for every incident that I can cite, I’m sure my wife could come up with dozens more.
There are so many questions that weren’t answered in baby books, or that we didn’t necessarily agree with — surely there is more than one definitive answer out there. Certainly there must have been other parents going through the same overtired, underlaundered, extra-snippy, “if you give me one more look about my fussy baby, I’m going to scream until my lungs give out” emotional revolving door that is the daily grind of parenting an infant.
J Baby helps to support parents through these trying early years.

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Community shines at J’s be. the Voice

Posted on 09 November 2017 by admin

Submitted report

This past Saturday, the Aaron Family J pulled off yet another night to remember: be. the Voice took place Nov. 4 at The Bomb Factory in Deep Ellum.  The “be.” fundraiser helps to raise money to support year-round J programs and services.
The be. the Voice event featured five group acts — the Heartbreakers, J Zen, Jew Kids on the Block, The Hot Shots and the Rockin’ Rabbis — and a surprise performance from CEO Artie Allen.
The winner of the be. the Voice of the J was the Jew Kids on the Block, benefiting the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education & Tolerance.

 

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