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Tycher Community Read set for Oct. 28

Tycher Community Read set for Oct. 28

Posted on 16 October 2019 by admin

Photo: Galen Evans
“‘In Another Time’ is my idea of what the rise of the Nazis looked like in that moment – how many didn’t know what was happening and what day-to-day lives were like,” said author Jillian Cantor. The author will be featured Oct. 28 at the Tycher Library Community Read, part of the 2019/2020 Aaron Family JCC Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Dallas Jewish BookFest.

This year’s book, ‘In Another Time,’ engaging and thrilling

By Deb Silverthorn
Time machines may not be real, and time not always linear, but it’s the gaps in between Jillian Cantor’s “In Another Time” that offer a spinning story. Beginning at 7 p.m., Monday, Oct. 28, at the Aaron Family JCC’s Zale Auditorium, Cantor will introduce her book at the Tycher Library Community Read, part of the 2019/2020 Aaron Family JCC’s Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Dallas Jewish BookFest.
“‘In Another Time’ is my idea of what the rise of the Nazis looked like in that moment — how many didn’t know what was happening and what day-to-day lives were like,” said Cantor, author of “Margot,” “The Hours Count” and “The Lost Letter.” This 2019 publication is a transporting love story, unfolding through decades and across continents, in alternating viewpoints.
In 1931 Germany, bookshop owner Max Beissinger meets Hanna Ginsberg, a budding concert violinist. As their love affair unfolds, the climate drastically changes as Hitler comes to power. Following Max in the years leading to WWII, and Hanna the decade after, “In Another Time” is a story of love and loss, passion and music and a family secret that may provide survival.
“I have loved Cantor’s work. She creates well-crafted page-turners and I’m looking forward to this,” said Linda Blasnik, a Tycher librarian for 10 years. “She creates a fantasy element, that is really thrilling.”
The author, who credits her fourth grade teacher for weekly assignments that introduced her to writing, enjoys Skyping and in-person discussions.
“I enjoy writing what I like reading,” said Cantor, a Philadelphia native, now living in Arizona with her family. “Music has always been a part of my life. Hanna’s character came to me while I was at the symphony during 2016’s election season. I listened, and thought, ‘no matter what happens, we’ll have beautiful music.’”
Rabbi Mordechai Harris, executive director of the Center for Jewish Education (CJE) & Rabbi in Residence at the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, will open the program co-sponsored by the CJE with support of the Jewish Book Council which is free and open to the public.
“This book is poignant and has such poetic flair. It’s beautiful. We’re happy to have Jillian here in person,” said CJE Coordinator of Projects and Administration, Karen Schlosberg. “The book is meaningful and her personal notes, of why she wrote it — that we can never forget our history — resonates.”
The Tycher Library, on the JCC’s third floor, houses 7,000-plus books, periodicals and more than 700 DVDs. In 1981, brothers Fred and Martin Tycher, of blessed memory, dedicated the library honoring their parents. The Tycher Library now pays tribute to the whole family’s dream to inspire Jewish learning through literature.
Texas Jewish Post contributor Harriet Gross helped launch the Community Read in 2006 after being inspired by citywide programs in Chicago and here in Richardson. Thirteen years later, the event is a go-to.
“The idea of a community reading and discussing one book was stimulating, to spark participation by asking groups to do something together with the book,” said Gross, who first shared it with then-librarian Joan Gremont. “Our first was ‘The Book Thief.’ Then, and ever since, we’ve shared good discussions and meaningful events and as the great ‘they’ say, the rest is history.”
Dallas’ Andrea Peskind Katz, reviewer of GreatThoughts.com and behind the Great Thoughts Great Readers Facebook book salon, with nearly 5000 readers and authors, is thanked by Cantor in her book’s acknowledgements. Katz says, “this is Jillian’s best, she’s a great speaker and ‘In Another Time’ is an on-target choice for the Community Read.”
The Tycher Community Read, and its Spring Read “Gateway to the Moon,” March 5, join this year’s BookFest schedule that includes themes of cooking, historical fiction, business entrepreneurship and fantasy.
For details, or to RSVP for “In Another Time” (by Oct. 23), visit jewishdallas.org/fallread. For overall BookFest details visit jccdallas.org/special-events/bookfest.

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JNF hosts Nimrod Ron exhibition

JNF hosts Nimrod Ron exhibition

Posted on 11 October 2019 by admin

Nearly 200 art enthusiast and Israel supporters gathered at the Laura Rathe Fine Art Gallery on Sept. 26 to see a special exhibition of the work of Israeli artist and entrepreneur Nimrod Ron. The event was conceptualized by Dallas philanthropist Elaine Pearlman, who, along with her husband Trevor, is a close and personal friend of Nimrod’s.
Nimrod served four years in the elite Shaldag unit of the Israel Defense Forces. He earned a JD and an MBA from Hebrew University. At the age of 29, he is already a successful high-tech entrepreneur and was named as one of Forbes Magazine’s “30 under 30.” His amazing talent earned him the honor of having his work displayed in the Dallas Museum of Biblical Art, alongside works from Andy Warhol.
“Thank you so much to Elaine and Trevor for making my dreams come true and making tonight a reality,” said Nimrod. “I decided to partner tonight with Jewish National Fund because I have seen firsthand the work that they are doing to continue Herzl’s dream in Israel. Everything they do is integral to a vision of building and connecting to the land of Israel.”
One of the works of art that was displayed and sold at the event was inspired by the relationship Nimrod developed with JNF, called Zionism 2.0, of Theodor Herzl painting a tree according to JNF’s vision. While the roots are darker in order to represent the initial struggle of the Jewish people, the rich color pallet represents the diversity and richness of Israeli culture, and its evolution into a vibrant nation. This piece, along with the others on display, sold at the event and 10% of all sales were donated to Jewish National Fund.

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Gabe Kapler’s firing by Phillies the latest blow for Jewish baseball players and managers at start of new year

Gabe Kapler’s firing by Phillies the latest blow for Jewish baseball players and managers at start of new year

Posted on 11 October 2019 by Sharon Wisch-Ray

By Marc Brodsky

(JTA) — 5780 has gotten off to, shall we say, a rocky start for Jewish baseball players and managers.
Two major league managers have lost their jobs in the Jewish New Year. Brad Ausmus, once the manager of Israel’s national team, is out after just one season leading the Los Angeles Angeles. On Thursday, Gabe Kapler was let go by the underperforming Philadelphia Phillies after two seasons. (At least they waited until after Yom Kippur.)
Players in the postseason fared no better.
Max Fried of the Atlanta Braves and Joc Pederson of the Los Angeles Dodgers chose to suit up on Yom Kippur (guess the latter learned nothing from Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax) and both lost their playoff series in deciding Game 5’s.
Fried came on in relief Wednesday amid a first-inning barrage by the St. Louis Cardinals but could not stem the tide as the National League’s Central Division champion scored 10 runs on the way to a 13-1 victory.
In a game that started about an hour and a half before the Jewish Day of Atonement ended, Pederson smacked a first-inning double and scored on a Max Muncy home run in the first inning against the Washington Nationals. The N.L.’s Western Division winners led 3-0 in the seventh, but the Nats rallied to tie it in the eighth inning and won 7-3 on a Howie Kendrick grand slam in the 10th.
The Cardinals and Nationals will meet in the N.L. Championship Series for the right to move on to the World Series.

Alex Bregman #2 of the Houston Astros still has a shot at this year’s World Series as he and the Astros take on the New York Yankees in the ALCS which begins Saturday Night in Houtson. Here Bregman throws the ball during the fourth inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers in game seven of the 2017 World Series at Dodger Stadium on November 1, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)


Alex Bregman still has a shot to get there with his Houston Astros. The star third baseman played on Yom Kippur eve, but the American League’s Western Division club lost to the host Tampa Bay Rays, who evened the best-of-5 series at 2-2.
Their deciding game is Thursday night — when there is no Jewish holiday.

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Mikie Blumenthal will perform in Mozart’s ‘Magic Flute’ starting Oct. 18

Mikie Blumenthal will perform in Mozart’s ‘Magic Flute’ starting Oct. 18

Posted on 10 October 2019 by admin

Photo: Courtesy The Dallas Opera
“Mozart wrote harmonically complicated parts and Mikie’s success is a testament to his passion for the art,” The Dallas Opera’s David Lomeli said of 13-year-old Mikie Blumenthal here, in last year’s TDO production of “La Bohème.”

Levine 7th grader will sing, fly high in Dallas Opera opener

By Deb Silverthorn
“Opera is cool, it is!,” says Michael “Mikie” Blumenthal and he knows. The 13-year-old takes to the stage of “The Magic Flute,” opening The Dallas Opera’s upcoming season. Between Oct. 18 and Nov. 3, at the Winspear Opera House, Blumenthal will become one of three genies – his greatest power? His voice and personality.
“Voices coming together with the orchestra, costumes and the set – amazing,” said Mikie, a seventh grader at Levine Academy who appeared in The Dallas Opera’s 2019 “La Bohème.” “Opera is just inspiring.”
“The Magic Flute” is a fantastical story with diverse instrumentation. In the tale of courage, faith and the power of music, young Tamino undergoes much to save the beautiful Pamina, the Queen of the Night’s daughter. Genies and villains, bunnies, bats, boars and a magic flute are part of this high-flying adventure with Mikie flying 35-feet above the stage.
“Mozart wrote harmonically complicated parts and Mikie’s success is a testament to his passion for the art,” said the Dallas Opera’s Director of Artistic Administration David Lomeli. “To be so young, and singing alongside some of opera’s superstars, is rare but he is deserving.
Mikie, born in Brussels, Belgium, first heard opera on the family’s car radio at the age of 5. While mimicing the singer, his talent shone through leaving his father shocked.
“I asked him to sing more, then again. His voice was not of a child,” said his father Benjamin. “We’re devoted to Mikie’s music but also to his childhood,” said Benjamin, noting Mikie plays soccer, basketball and finds plenty of time to be with his friends.
The respect for music and Judaica may well be embedded, Mikie’s parents are musicians and his paternal grandfather, and great-grandfather, rabbis. Mikie who began professional training in 2017, is a student of Brian Schexnayder and Nili Riemer, coincidentally a Levine Academy parent.
“I love opera and keeping Shabbos,” said Mikie, who celebrated his bar mitzvah in Jerusalem this summer. For him, 5 p.m. Shabbat dinners, staying close to and walking to the theater are easy accommodations. “It’s about community and family, and fortunately being observant and being a singer can happen.”
Mikie, who with his family moved to Dallas when he was seven, has sung on the stage of Levine Academy’s events and also at a Bnai Zion event, a Congregation Nishmat Am gala, the JCC Bagel Run and the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas’ annual meeting. Operatic expressions of “Hatikvah” and “Star-Spangled Banner,” won’t soon be forgotten.
“Mikie has an extraordinary and tremendous talent and he’s bringing so much joy to our community,” said Levine Academy’s Head of School Tom Elieff. “He remains strong in his academics, he’s a beloved friend, good athlete and proud Jew. He makes us all at Levine very proud.”
“Mozart was a wonderful composer but if we think of him as a songwriter, it’s really the same, maybe more people would be interested,” said Mikie, who has studied German to prepare for his upcoming role.
With an already strong fan base, including many of his classmates who were introduced to the art by him, Mikie is ready to take the stage at the Winspear.
“I hope people who love opera will come,” he said, “but what I really hope is people who wouldn’t think to give it a chance will come because I’m sure we can change their minds.”
For tickets and information visit tinyurl.com/Mikie-Blumenthal-Magic-Flute. Levine Academy families should email benjaminblumenthal74@gmail.com

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AJC Dallas to honor attorney Hilda C. Galvan

AJC Dallas to honor attorney Hilda C. Galvan

Posted on 10 October 2019 by admin

AJC Dallas will honor Hilda C. Galvan, partner-in-charge of the Dallas office of Jones Day, with its 2019 Human Relations Award. The event will take place Nov. 12 at the Statler Hotel, 1914 Commerce St.
The prestigious AJC award is presented to leading members of the business and civic community who have made a significant contribution to the betterment of life on local and national levels. It is awarded in recognition of their dedication to the welfare of the community at large and their devotion to the enrichment of the quality of life for people everywhere, and the generosity of their spirit.
“Hilda is an icon in the business community. More importantly, her leadership in our community is a clear reflection of AJCs core values. AJC is proud to have the opportunity to shine a spotlight on her accomplishments,” reported AJC Dallas Director Joel Schwitzer.
Named one of “The Most Powerful Business Leaders” in Dallas-Fort Worth” by D CEO in 2016-2018 and as the 2019 Lawyer of the Year: Litigation-Patent by The Best Lawyers in America, Galvan is a nationally recognized trial lawyer who focuses on complex intellectual property litigation. IAM magazine referred to her as a “powerhouse litigator” with “extensive experience in big-ticket patent litigation.” Chambers praised Galvan for her ability to “bring experience and strategy” to her clients.
Through her leadership with a wide range of organizations, Galvan has demonstrated her ongoing commitment to living the values embodied by the AJC award. Her long list of civic leadership includes serving as the first Latina president of the Dallas Regional Chamber, trustee for the University of Texas School of Law Foundation, and board member of Parkland Foundation, Texas Women’s Foundation, SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering, the Dallas Hispanic Law Foundation, AVANCE and Circle Ten Scouts among others.
More than 400 people, corporate community members and AJC supporters, are expected to attend. An opening reception will begin at 6:15 p.m. followed by dinner and the program. Tickets are available for purchase at www.ajc/dallas/humanrelations. org. Those unable to attend may make a contribution to AJC in Galvan’s honor.
Past Dallas recipients of the AJC Human Relations Award include General (Ret.) Hugh G. Robinson (1990), Charles T. Terrell (1991), Harriet E. Miers (1992), John L. Adams (1993), Caren and Vin Prothro (1994), Robert K. Hoffman (1995), Mayor Ron Kirk and Matrice Ellis-Kirk (1996), Liz Minyard and Gretchen Minyard Williams (1997), Chuck Norris (1998), Erle Nye (1999), Raymond D. Nasher (2000), Dee and Charles Wyly (2001), Gerald A. Sampson (2002), Liener Temerlin (2003), Ambassador Kathryn and Craig Hall (2006), Representative Rafael Anchia (2009), Philip J. Romano (2012), Bobby Lyle (2013) and Joe Goyne (2018)AJC is the leading global Jewish advocacy organization and has worked for more than 113 years on a variety of issues, including combating bigotry, antisemitism and extremism; advancing pluralism; and safeguarding the rights and freedoms of all people. A fiercely nonpartisan organization, AJC is an important coalition builder engaging the Jewish and other communities to advance shared values and common concerns.
Please contact Dallas@ajc.org for more information.

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Texas Jewish death row inmate wins stay of execution

Texas Jewish death row inmate wins stay of execution

Posted on 10 October 2019 by admin

Randy Halprin

Sentencing judge accused of being anti-Semitic


Wire and Staff Report
A Jewish death row inmate in Texas who says his judge was anti-Semitic was granted a stay of execution by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals.
The stay order was issued Friday, Oct. 4.
Randy Halprin, 41, had been set to be executed Oct. 10. He was part of the “Texas 7” group of prisoners who escaped from the John B. Connally Unit near Kenedy in 2000 and were convicted and sentenced to death for the murder of a police officer who responded to a robbery they committed at an Oshman’s Sporting Goods store on Christmas Eve. Four of them have already been executed.
In May, Halprin said in an appeal that the judge who sentenced him in 2003, Vickers Cunningham, referred to him using anti-Semitic slurs, including “f*n’ Jew” and “gn ke.”
The Dallas Morning News reported last year that Cunningham, who is white, rewarded his children with a trust if they married someone who is white, Christian and of the opposite sex.
The court denied Halprin’s appeal last month.
On Thursday, Halprin appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
Meanwhile, a Dallas County trial court will determine if the claims against Cunningham warrant a new trial for Halprin.
At the time of his escape, Halprin was serving a 30-year prison term for beating and injuring a child. He does not deny being at the scene when police officer Aubrey Hawkins was murdered in December 2000, but says he did not fire his gun.
Members from the Jewish community and other faith groups have pressed for a new trial for Halprin, 41, who appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court Friday.
Dallas attorneys Stuart Blaugrand and Marc Stanley filed a 13-page brief with the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals last month. The brief was signed by AJC, more than 100 Texas Jewish lawyers, the Union for Reform Judaism, the Central Conference of American Rabbis and Men of Reform Judaism.
The AJC Dallas Office was instrumental in securing the signatures from the Jewish attorneys across the state.
“I was so proud of the 108 Texas Jewish lawyers who — along with the American Jewish Committee, the Union for Reform Judaism, the Central Conference of American Rabbis, and Men of Reform Judaism — stood up against this injustice. The caliber of this group helped raise the urgency and visibility of Halprin’s appeal,” said Stanley.
“This case demonstrates the importance of AJC’s work in confronting anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry in order to safeguard our freedoms and ensure equal justice for all,” said Blaugrand, who is also a Dallas AJC board member. “I feel privileged to have joined with so many distinguished colleagues in helping Randy Halprin secure a hearing to prove judicial bias resulted in the denial of his due process rights because a trial conducted before a racist judge who boasts of his bigotry is no trial at all. If Vickers Cunningham is a racist as alleged, Randy must receive a new trial presided over by an impartial judge.”
Before Friday’s ruling, Marc Rylander, director of communications for Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, told JNS, “It is our policy never to comment on litigation strategy in an ongoing matter, particularly a criminal case. Our office has filed publicly available documents with the relevant courts detailing at length why the sentence the jury imposed in this case was lawful and appropriate, so we will let those filings speak for themselves.”

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Local StandWithUs High School Interns named

Local StandWithUs High School Interns named

Posted on 10 October 2019 by admin

Photo: Courtesy StandWithUs
Four Dallas area teens are serving as StandWithUs High School interns. They are pictured here from left with StandWithUs Southwest High School Area Coordinator Katie Chavez at the five-day conference held in LA, Aug. 4-8. From left, back row, Ethan Liebnick, Alisabella Ackermann, No’am Gilat-Elbaz; front row, from left, Tamar Yahalom and Chavez.

Submitted Story
Four Dallas-area teens were selected from dozens of applications to be the StandWithUs High School Interns for 2019-20. Ethan Liebnick, Plano West Senior High School; Alisabella Ackermann and No’am Gilat-Elbaz from Akiba Yavneh Academy of Dallas and Tamar Yahalom from Richardson High School.
The TJP recently published (TJP Sept. 12) Liebnick’s explanation of elections in Israel. “The topic [elections] was the first group chat we had with Kate Chavez, SWU’s southwest high school coordinator right after the conference,” Liebnick said. “Educating about this complex system fulfills one of my goals as an Intern to write about aspects of Israel people may be unfamiliar with.”
Liebnick is referring to the “StandWithUs High School Internship Conference” held in Los Angeles Aug. 4-8. It brought together the 98 Interns from 95 high schools throughout North America.
The five-day conference focused on Israel education, leadership and professional development skills. Interns learned how to organize programs and create relationships with different groups. Israel’s history and current events were reviewed. There was a session on the conflict from both sides and another on how to distinguish when legitimate criticism of Israel crosses the line into anti-Semitism, among many others.
Created in 2012, the StandWithUs High School Internship is the only yearlong program of its kind in high schools. It prepares students for the difficult climate they may face at universities regarding anti-Israel and anti-Semitic actions. Interns create Israel clubs in their schools, bring in speakers, write op-eds and educate their peers and the community about Israel and anti-Semitism. In January, North Texas’ five interns will attend StandWithUs’ annual “Israel in Focus” International Conference in Los Angeles.
The interns shared their reasons for applying to the StandWithUs High School Internship.
Liebnick joined to “facilitate positive and progressive discussion on Israel beyond the usual discord, and focus on finding what this nation means to all of us, individually. The conference taught me how to approach these conversations with facts and address claims against Israel peacefully, in a way that turns a potential argument into a constructive talk. Utilizing these skills, I plan to create unique events to give perspective on the Israel story.”
Gilat-Elbaz applied for other reasons.
“I heard a lot about Israel from both sides that I knew was wrong – those who claim Israel is absolutely perfect whatever it does to those who call it a nation of inhumane child-killers. I felt surrounded by extremists,” No’am Gilat-Elbaz shares. “I wanted the tools to educate and explain Israel’s story to those around me.”
He explained that he was initially apprehensive.
“I was a bit concerned about the education I would receive at the conference, but was presented with very well-balanced programming. The perfect mix of emotional stories, two-sided education, and cultivation of professional skills exceeded all my expectations. I am excited to offer programming to my community that show different sides of Israel, to learn more from my internship peers and educate the people around me.”
Alisabella Ackermann is a passionate advocate for truth.
She joined because “as an Israeli, a Jew and an advocate for truth, I felt it was my responsibility to educate myself and others about Israel and it’s role in the international community. The conference exposed me to various perspectives about the conflict. I learned how to combat anti-Semitic and anti-Israel language in a constructive, open-minded manner. I am excited to attend the January conference and proudly represent the work that I’ve done.”
Ackermann and Gilat-Elbaz already have created two programs at Akiba Yavneh Academy — one clarified the Israeli election process and, another is a monthly “coffee and conversation” on topical issues.
Richardson High School student Tamar Yahalom concurred with her peers and added, “Israel has always been very important in my life, and recently, I’ve seen the growing need for Israel education. I think it is more important than ever for young people to learn the facts and know Israel’s story.”
At the conference, she learned the importance of active listening especially when there is a difference of opinion.
“A wide range of opinions exist regarding Israel — even in the pro-Israel community — that differ from my own. At the conference, I learned that those feelings must be respected and acknowledged to have a meaningful debate. I look forward to educating my peers and sharing my love for Israel! I’m especially excited to show people a side of Israel that is fun, relatable and memorable.”
Kate Chavez, StandWithUs Southwest High School coordinator, said the Dallas interns have already made an impact in a short time.
“The Dallas interns are leaders in the Internship and prove this by taking the initiative to approach their places of worship, youth groups and high schools to promote Israel education. As I watch them lead conversations, empower their peers and commit themselves to education, I can attest to their ability to be real change-makers in the Dallas community,” she said
Submitted by StandWithUs Southwest High School Coordinator Kate Chavez

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Gunman kills 2 in attack near German synagogue and at kebab shop

Gunman kills 2 in attack near German synagogue and at kebab shop

Posted on 10 October 2019 by Sharon Wisch-Ray

A bus with the inscription “evacuation” is escorted by police in Halle, Germany, where a gunman killed two people before being taken into custody by police, Oct. 9, 2019. (Sebastian Willnow/dpa-Zentralbild/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images)

By Ron Kampeas, Toby Axelrod

(JTA) — Two people were killed by a gunman who opened fire near a synagogue during Yom Kippur services and at a kebab shop in Halle, a town in eastern Germany Wednesday.
The masked gunman reportedly was repelled by the synagogue’s doors, which were secured shut during the services Wednesday on the most solemn day of the Jewish year. There were 51 worshippers in the synagogue during the attack, including 10 American youths, according to The New York Times.
The gunman, who was reported to be a far rightist and livestreamed the attack, then shot a woman dead near the entrance to the adjacent Jewish cemetery and subsequently killed a man at a kebab shop.
Two people who sustained gunshot wounds went into surgery at Halle’s university hospital, a hospital spokesman told the BBC.
The gunman, who has been arrested, posted his 35-minute video on the gaming platform Twitch before it was removed. He was dressed in combat gear with a helmet.
SITE, a private intelligence group based in the United States, said on Twitter that the shooter in the video said in English that the “root of all problems are Jews.” CNN quoted a German security official as saying that the ideology driving the attack was from the far right.
“My name is Anon and I think the holocaust never happened … feminism is the cause of declining birth rates in the West which acts as a scapegoat for mass immigration, and the root of all these problems are Jews,” he said in the livestream.
He has been identified by authorities as Stephan B., a 27-year-old German from the nearby state of Saxony-Anhalt, according to The Telegraph. He fled in a car and later tried to hijack a taxi before being arrested.
Security was increased at synagogues throughout Germany in the wake of the attack.
“The perpetrator shot multiple times at the door and threw a couple of Molotov cocktails, fireworks or grenades at it. But the door stayed closed, God has protected us,” Max Privorotzki, the head of the Jewish community in Halle, told Spiegel online.
The head of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, Josef Schuster, said the news of the attack and killings has “deeply distressed and frightened our community.”
“The perpetrator tried to enter the synagogue, and the neighboring Jewish cemetery was also attacked, so that an anti-Semitic motive is presumed,” he said. “The brutality of the attack goes beyond anything that has happened in recent years and is a profound shock to all Jews in Germany.”
He added that it was “scandalous that the synagogue in Halle was not protected by the police on a holiday like Yom Kippur.”
Rebecca Blady, a visiting rabbi in Berlin for Base, a Hillel program in Germany, with her husband, Jeremy Borovitz, had been invited with other guests from Berlin to spend Yom Kippur in Halle. After the holiday she posted on Facebook about the attack.
“It’s the end of Yom Kippur in Halle, Germany. We’ve made it out with our lives, in health, and amazing spirits — with gratitude to G-d — as today there was a large scale terrorist attack in Halle, and the terrorist began his day right outside the walls of the synagogue we were praying in,” she wrote.
She also wrote: “For whatever reason, the man with the gun was stalled or prohibited from entering the synagogue. G-d counted us all there today, one by one, as deserving of life.”
Following the shooting, the worshippers at the synagogue were taken to a local hospital to be checked for shock and trauma, Blady said, and they prayed the concluding Neilah service and blew the shofar there.
German and international leaders condemned the attack.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel expressed her condolences and “solidarity for all Jews on the holy day of Yom Kippur,” according to the BBC.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said in a statement that “The terrorist attack against the Jewish community in Halle, Germany, on Yom Kippur, the holiest day of our people, is additional testimony that anti-Semitism in Europe is increasing.”
“On behalf of the people of Israel, I send condolences to the families of the victims and wishes for a quick recovery to the injured,” he said. “I call on the German authorities to continue taking determined action against anti-Semitism.”
Israel’s president, Reuven Rivlin, also issued a statement on Wednesday night.
“We are stunned and pained by the terrible anti-Semitic murders in Germany today, during the holiest and most important day of the year for all Jews around the world. I call on the leaders of Germany and the free world to bring the full force of law against anti-Semitism and its results,” he wrote.
World Jewish Congress President Ronald Lauder said in a statement: “It is appalling that on this day — the holiest in the Jewish calendar — when Jews are sitting in synagogues all around the world immersed in prayer, yet another attack against Jews has been perpetrated. We also need immediately to launch a unified front against neo-Nazi and other extremist groups, which threaten our well-being. The fact that, 75 years after the Holocaust, such groups are gaining influence in Germany speaks volumes.”
This story will be updated.

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2019-2020 JCC BookFest begins Oct. 24

2019-2020 JCC BookFest begins Oct. 24

Posted on 02 October 2019 by admin

Photo: Deb Silverthorn
The 2019/2020 Aaron Family JCC’s Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Dallas Jewish BookFest schedule includes “Park Avenue Summer” and “Wartime Sisters” (10/24), “In Another Time” (10/28), “Unorthodox Match” (11/6), “Sababa: Fresh Sunny Flavors from My Israeli Kitchen” (11/19), “Time to Get Tough: How Cookies, Coffee, and a Crash Led to Success in Business and Life” (12/9), “A Rosenberg By Any Other Name” (1/9), “The 30-Day Money Cleanse” (2/6), “America’s Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today” (2/11), “Gateway to the Moon” (3/5), “Rescue Board: The Untold Story of America’s Efforts to Save the Jews of Europe” (3/12), “Savage News (3/17),” “The Guest Book” (4/2), “Witness: Lessons From Elie Wiesel’s Classroom” (5/23), “Extracted: Unmasking Rampant Antisemitism in America’s Higher Education” (5/11). Visit jccdallas.org/special-events/bookfest for times and locations.

By Deb Silverthorn
Bookmarks are being placed in and out of the page turners of the 2019-2020 Aaron Family JCC’s Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Dallas Jewish BookFest. Opening October 24 and running through May 11, 15 authors will present some of this year’s best storytelling and non-fiction publications. Unless otherwise noted, all events begin at 7 p.m. and are hosted at the Aaron Family JCC.
“I am honored to chair this year’s BookFest and excited about the breadth of authors lined up for this year and I hope we’ll have record breaking audiences. There is something for everyone including subjects of cooking and historical fiction to business entrepreneurship and fantasy,” said JCC BookFest Chair Marcy Helfand. “It is wonderful that our JCC offers our community the opportunity to hear from these authors whose presentations include anecdotes about their writing process, question and answer sessions, and more.”
BookFest events are partnered with Congregation Anshai Torah, Congregation Shearith Israel SISterhood, the Dallas Jewish Historical Society, Interabang Books, the Jewish Book Council, the Women’s Philanthropy Division of the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, Temple Emanu-El Women of Reform Judaism, the Tycher Library of the Center for Jewish Education of the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas and Whole Foods Market.
Aaron Family JCC Director of Israel Engagement and Jewish Living Rachelle Weiss Crane and Jewish, Cultural, and Outreach Coordinator Adina Weinberg heard the pitches of nearly 250 authors at a presentation of the Jewish Book Council in New York. The two returned to Dallas, narrowing the list, and with Helfand and a dedicated committee, determined the final 15.
“Every year I think we have the best lineup – and I absolutely am sure of it again this year. We are introduced to the books and authors with a two-minute pitch and somehow, we have again narrowed down to a list of really special books,” said Weiss Crane. “We are thrilled to welcome Marcy as our chair, following in the strong and incredible footsteps of Liz Liener, and we look forward to continuing to earn the reputation our JCC has built as a BookFest.
The Opener: Oct. 24
A double header opens BookFest on Oct. 24 with Lynda Loigman and her “Wartime Sisters,” and Renee Rosen and her “Park Avenue Summer.” Dallas’ Andrea Peskind Katz, reviewer of GreatThoughts.com and behind the Great Thoughts Great Readers Facebook book salon with nearly 5,000 readers and authors, will lead a conversation, addressing the roles of Jewish women during and just after WWII, with the authors.
“Wartime Sisters” is the tale of two estranged sisters, one living in relative ease on the Armory campus as an officer’s wife, the other a war widow, and each with their own secret, who are reunited in the early days of WWII.
“Park Avenue Summer” is set in 1965 and told from the perspective of Alice Weiss, assistant to Cosmopolitan magazine’s Helen Gurley Brown. The novel, toasted as “Mad Men” meets “The Devil Wears Prada,” offers a window into Brown’s tumultuous efforts to reshape the magazine.
The Tycher Community Read: Oct. 28
The Tycher Community Read, on Oct. 28, presents author Jillian Cantor and her “In Another Time.” Cantor’s book is a historical novel that spans Germany, England and the United States following a young couple torn apart by circumstance leading up to World War II and the family secret that may prove to be the means for survival. Told in alternating viewpoints, Max Beissinger in the years leading up to WWII, and Hanna Ginsberg in the ten years after is about love and survival, passion and music, across time and continents.

Shearith Israel SISterhood Event: Nov. 6
Naomi Ragen returns to BookFest on Nov. 6 at Congregation Shearith Israel with her “Unorthodox Match.” The novel of faith shares the story of Yaakov, a father, a Talmud scholar, and a widower who struggles both financially and spiritually and Lola, a woman from the secular world who has suffered terrible tragedy and hardship in her life who turns to God and the Orthodox community in Brooklyn.

Israeli Cookbook At Whole Foods: Nov. 19
On Nov. 19, at Whole Foods (Preston/Forest) cookbook author Adeena Sussman brings her “Sababa: Fresh Sunny Flavors from My Israeli Kitchen” to Dallas (location to be announced). “Sababa” is a celebration of Israeli cooking, showcasing Sussman’s highly personal take on the Israeli kitchen and its diverse, delicious, and vibrant culture. “Sababa’s: 120 recipes, including Honey Harissa Chicken Thighs, Stuffed Grape Leaves with Quince and Barberries and Zucchini, Dill and Feta Shakshuka provide a full complement of salads, main courses, and desserts.
Business Insights at Anshai Torah: Dec. 9
Michael J. Coles arrives on Dec. 9 with his “Time to Get Tough: How Cookies, Coffee, and a Crash Led to Success in Business and Life.” This event at Congregation Anshai Torah, Rabbi Stefan Weinberg will lead the discussion with Coles, co-founder of the Great American Cookie Company and former CEO of Caribou Coffee. In his book, the author reflects on his life, sharing a wealth of knowledge and tips gathered over the years as a community and business leader, recounting his failures and successes.
Learn about Jewish name changing: Jan. 9
“A Rosenberg By Any Other Name” and its author Kirsten Fermaglich come to the J on Jan. 9, with a history of the practice of Jewish name changing in the twentieth century. Fermaglich’s book demonstrates how historical debates about immigration, anti-Semitism and race, class mobility, gender and family, the boundaries of the Jewish community, and the power of government are reshaped when name changing becomes part of the conversation.
Clean up your finances: Feb. 6
On Feb. 6, a program exclusive to young professionals, author Ashley Feinstein Gerstley will present “The 30-Day Money Cleanse.” Feinstein Gerstley’s system advises how to eliminate all money stressors, know where your money is going, break panic-inducing bad money habits, learn basics of how and where to invest and how to make a plan to not only live with but enjoy.
“The number of young Jewish professionals in Dallas is growing and so are the networking, social and religious opportunities in the Metroplex,” said the J’s Weinberg. “The J is happy to present events, including our November 11 Jewish Film Festival screening of Chewdaism, exclusively for this population. “The 30-Day Money Cleanse” explores shifting perspectives for us all to get what we want out of our financial situations.”
History of American Jewish Women at Temple Emanu-El: Feb. 11
On Feb. 11, at Temple Emanu-El, the Dallas Jewish Historical Society and the Temple Emanu-El Women of Reform Judaism will present author Pamela Nadell and her “America’s Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today.” Nadell brings together stories from the colonial era’s matriarch Grace Nathan and her great-granddaughter poet Emma Lazarus to union organizer Bessie Hillman and the great justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The book profiles activists, workers, wives, and mothers whose names linger on among their communities and families which left deep footprints in the history of the nation they call home.
Tycher Spring Read: March 5
On March 5, the Tycher Library’s Spring Read arrives in the form of “Gateway to the Moon,” Mary Morris’ story of Luis de Torres, a Spanish Jew and interpreter of Christopher Columbus. Over the centuries, de Torres’ descendants travel from Spain and Portugal to Mexico, finally settling in the hills of New Mexico and, 500 years later, it is Miguel Torres, a young amateur astronomer, who finds himself trying to understand the mystery that surrounds him and the town he grew up in.
Learn about The War Refugee Board: March 12
On March 12, Dr. Rebecca Erbelding brings “Rescue Board: The Untold Story of America’s Efforts to Save the Jews of Europe.” For more than a decade, a harsh Congressional immigration policy kept most Jewish refugees out of America, even as Hitler and the Nazis closed in. In 1944, Franklin D. Roosevelt created the War Refugee Board putting a young Treasury lawyer named John Pehle in charge. Holocaust historian Erbelding pieces together years of research and newly uncovered archival materials to tell the dramatic story of America’s little-known efforts to save the Jews of Europe.
A gritty novel on politics and the #MeToo Movement: March 17
Jessica Yellin comes to the J on March 17 with her “Savage News.” The heart of the story navigates ratings wars, workplace sexual harassment and an international political crisis in order to prove herself. The political climate, the world of social media and the #MeToo movement all weave their way as journalist Natalie Savage figures out that having it all doesn’t mean giving up everything she stands for.
An intergenerational page turner: April 2
Author Sarah Blake brings her “The Guest Book” to Dallas on April 2. Moving through three generations and back and forth in time, the story of a family and a country that buries its past in quiet, until the present calls forth a reckoning, Blake’s “The Guest Book” asks how we remember and what we choose to forget. It shows the untold secrets we inherit and pass on, unknowingly echoing our parents and grandparents.
In depth look at Elie Wiesel: April 23
On April 23, author and Rabbi Ariel Burger will be in conversation about his Witness: Lessons From Elie Wiesel’s Classroom with Executive Director, Center for Jewish Education and Rabbi in Residence, Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, Rabbi Mordechai Harris. In his book, Burger, who met Wiesel at age 15 and then became his student and teaching assistant, shares Wiesel’s remarkable exchanges in and out of the classroom, chronicling intimate conversations on matters of intellect, spirituality, and faith, while Burger navigated his own journey from boyhood to rabbi and teacher.
Anti-Semitism and higher education: May 11
This year’s BookFest closes on May 11 with Dr. Perry Brickman’s “Extracted: Unmasking Rampant Antisemitism in America’s Higher Education.” In 2006, Brickman and his wife Shirley attended a history of Jewish life exhibit at Emory University, viewing documents that strongly suggested that Brickman and others had been failed out of Emory’s dental school because they were Jewish. The couple embarked on an uncharted path to uncover the truth, exposing the human element of the rampant anti-Semitism that affected the dental profession in twentieth-century America, the personal tragedies, faces, and individual stories of shame and humiliation. Brickman identified, interviewed and recorded the victims, ultimately presenting his documentary to Emory officials who apologized.
Tickets are $10/advance and $15/door except for October 28’s “In Another Time,” February 6’s “The 30-Day Money Cleanse” and March 5’s “Gateway to the Moon.” To confirm location details, or for more details or to order tickets, call 214-739-2737 or visit jccdallas.org/special-events/bookfest Young professionals interested in the Young Professionals’ event should email aweinberg@jccdallas.org.

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Texas colleges provide rich programming for High Holidays

Texas colleges provide rich programming for High Holidays

Posted on 02 October 2019 by admin

Photo: Submitted by Melissa Duchin
Students enjoy Erev Rosh Hashanah dinner with UTD Hillel Sept. 30.

Staff Report
Texas universities are no exception when it comes to providing a home away from home for their Jewish students.
Here’s an overview of what some Texas Hillels and Chabads are doing for their Jewish students over the chagim.


Texas A& M
Chabad
At Chabad of A&M more than 150 Jewish Aggies participated in programming. Aggie Chabad Director Rabbi Yossi Lazaroff said, “Being away from home can be rough, away from family and your favorite holiday treats makes it tougher. This is an age where many are so ‘connected’ on social media yet spending time alone in their dorm rooms.
“Holidays at Chabad are all about the feeling of family. That means you will be greeted with a smile, a hug and a spot for you at the table. That means we will be making sure that if your vegan, gluten-free or allergen needs are met. We take ‘Home away from Home’ slogan seriously.”
With Rosh Hashanah in the rearview mirror, Aggie Chabad will shift its focus toward Yom Kippur and Sukkot. In addition to traditional services, Chabad will host ‘why pray’ workshop alternative with a focus on some of the Yom Kippur key prayers to lend depth and meaning to the service for those uninspired and or unfamiliar with services. There will also be pre-fast and post-fast meals.
For Sukkot, Chabad will host lunch daily in the campus Sukkah for students convenience, right near the Memorial Student Center in the heart of campus.
Hillel
Risa Bierman, executive director at Hillel at Texas A&M also has extensive programs planned.
“Having around 300-500 Jews on campus it is so important for Hillel to be accessible and available for the students, she said. They have access 24/7 to our building to come in and study, hang out and just schmooze with their friends. Hillel strives to provide programming that helps the students be successful in college and beyond. We enrich the students Jewish identity in many ways. The students lead services every Friday and during some holidays. We offer cooking in the Kitchen classes every other Wednesday and resume and interviewing skills whenever a student needs help. Rabbi Jonathan Siger, provides Jewish learning classes to inform and challenge our students. All in all our aim is to engage with every Jewish student at Texas A&M and make them feel welcome and a part of the community. Hillel held services on erev and both days of Rosh Hashanah.
For Yom Kippur, they will have a pre-fast dinner Tuesday and services Wednesday at 10 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Sukkot events begin Oct. 14. “We will be having dessert and dinner in the sukkah. Wednesday night a no-bake and take in the sukkah. Friday night we will eat Shabbat dinner in the sukkah.”
Aggie Hillel will update events through social media.


SMU
Hillel director Rabbi Heidi Coretz tells the TJP, “ Because we are a small campus in the middle of a vibrant Jewish community, our students actually attend services at the local synagogues, mostly Temple Emanu-El and Shearith Israel. For Sukkot, Hillel at SMU comes to my house for “Sushi in the Sukkah” which is always always a highlight of our year.”
Sushi in the Sukkah is co-sponsored by SMU Jewish Studies and is at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 16.
SMU’s Millennial group, WE, will have a WE Sukkot Shabbat in Rabbi Coretz’s sukkah at 7 p.m., Friday, Oct. 18. WE is for the 21 and older crowd.
Students will head back to the local synagogues for Simchat Torah.


University of Texas at Austin
Chabad
University of Texas Chabad has events just about every night of the week, and the chagim are no exception. For Yom Kippur, Chabad will hold Kol Nidre services at 7 p..m., Tuesday, Oct. 8. On Wednesday morning services are at 10 a.m., with Mincha/Neilah beginning at 5:30 p.m. followed by a break-the-fast at 7:45 p.m. On Erev Sukkot, Sunday, Oc.t 13, Chabad will host Sushi in the Sukkah.
Dallas native and UT alum Ethan Prescott explained the importance of UT Chabad.
“While at The University of Texas, I always had a place for Shabbat, holidays or just to talk. Rabbi Zev and Ariela always are willing to go the extra mile for their students,” he said.
“This connection and care for the students doesn’t end upon graduation. Zev and Ariela continue to connect with alumni through local programming.
Shortly after Yom Tov ended, Tuesday, Rabbi Zev Johnson told the TJP, “We just finished up one of the most epic of all time Rosh Hashanah’s here at UT.
“We hosted close to 400 students at UT chabad and over 500 students heard the shofar all around campus. Including at AE
Phi, ZBT, Sammy, AEPI and Zeta.
“So many students expressed how happy they were to come celebrate and feel part of our family, whether it was in house or bumping into them at their houses or even in the streets. Moments like these gives me real hope for a very bright Jewish future.”

Hillel
Maiya Chard-Yaron, executive director of Texas Hillel, tells the TJP that they see about 1,000 students, faculty and staff during the High Holidays.
Each year they serve more than 500 meals including a huge Break-the-Fast.
“We offer a lot of options for students – different types of services, kosher meals, and alternative programs like a social justice discussion. While many students join us for the entirety of the holidays, we also have a lot of students who join us for programs and services while still going to classes in between.”
Chard-Yaron explains that it’s important for Hillel to “meet” students at whatever level of observance they are at.
“We are here to support students in celebrating and marking the holidays in whatever way is comfortable for them. We strive to create a welcoming atmosphere for all those who join us on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, whether they are daily/weekly Hillel-goers, or this is their first time here,” Chard-Yaron said.


Hillel of North Texas
Melissa Duchin, director of Hillels of North Texas which encompasses UTD and UNT, explained that Hillel connects students with local synagogues for services and hosts programs for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur break-the-fast.
On Friday, Sept. 27, Hillel hosted 90 students, alumni, family and friends over UNT Family Weekend for Shabbat services led by students followed by dinner.
Monday, Sept. 30 Hillel hosted 35 students and alumni at University of Texas, Dallas for Rosh Hashanah. “We ate pomegranate seeds, dipped apples in honey, and heard the sound of the shofar from our very talented students,” said Duchin.
Tuesday, Oct. 1 University of North Texas students led an Ask Big Questions discussion on Rosh Hashanah “What will you do better this year?”
Most of Hillels of North Texas events are posted on Facebook at http://facebook.com/hillelutdallas/ and https://www.facebook.com/unthillel/.

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