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Issuing open invitation to National Park Service’s 100th birthday celebration

Posted on 28 April 2016 by admin

Be it known that each of the 410 units of our national park system are doing their utmost to encourage all Americans and foreign visitors as well, to come visit these treasures which are protected by the women and men of the National Park Service, the 100-year-old branch of the  Department of Interior.
It was in 1916 that the National Park Service was established by President Woodrow Wilson, resulting in the formation of  a group of professionally  trained park protectors and educators  known as Park Rangers.
By 1918, the  Park Rangers had completely replaced units of the U.S. Army Calvary who were being sent to help our allies fight the war in Europe.
While today’s National Park Rangers may be more educated and specialized than their forbearers, their primary responsibility is still the protection of the park and its visitors.
Each park unit has its unique history and set of attractions. While perhaps planning for a family vacation, you might consider a side trip to a NPS unit nearby, a full-fledged camping trip in a campground, or — for more advanced challenges — a backcountry hike or canoe trip.
For the more physically challenged, many parks have shorter, wheelchair accessible trails. Larger parks may offer programs for various age groups as well as for families.
If you are not into the “great outdoors,” there are numerous other NPS Sites you can find which are outstanding, one-of-a kind, and often historic, located all over the USA.
One of the finest examples of American Colonial religious architecture is Touro Synagogue National Historic Site located in Newport, Rhode Island.
Touro was established in 1763 by the  Sephardic Spanish and Portuguese community and continues to function as a Jewish synagogue to this day.
Now the home of Congregation Jeshuat Israel, Touro’s status as a National Historic Site provides both federal protection and technical assistance for the preservation of the building.
Want to learn more about our national parks?  Just Google nps.gov or visit your public library to begin what can be a wonderful adventure for you and your loved ones at the National Park Services  100th birthday celebration.

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